Romans Chapter Three

Overview

In “Romans Chapter One” I showed how that the Greek pistis doesn’t mean “faith” but “faithfulness” which is proven by Paul’s quote from Habakkuk, “The just shall live by faith [pistis 4102]” (1:17), “the just shall live by his faith” (Hab 2:4), “live because of his faithfulness” (NET), “live by his faithfulness” (NIV). Therefore, “the righteousness of God which is by faith [faithfulness] of Jesus Christ,” isn’t about our faith at all, but about Jesus Christ’s faithfulness, “the righteousness of God through the faithfulness of Jesus Christ” (NET).

In “Romans Chapter Two” I defined the two main distinctions within the law of Moses as the moral righteousness of the law, and the non-moral actions of the law. The non-moral actions of the law are the special ordinances God imposed upon His people by circumcision: abstinence from unclean meats, keeping the Sabbath and other holy days, observing the annual feasts, tithing to the priests, and offering animal sacrifices. Because these two main distinctions aren’t being distinguished but are being conflated as simply the moral righteousness of the law, therefore it’s being taught today that God’s righteousness isn’t by morally righteous living, but simply by believing or having faith! Therefore, all of the Scriptures about Jesus Christ’s faithfulness have been translated to sound like it’s our faith rather than His faithfulness.

Here in “Romans Chapter Three” Paul is going to explain the purpose of the law and its place in God’s overall purpose of His Son Jesus Christ. Specifically, he is going to contrast the actions of the Levitical priests in sacrificing animals with the faithfulness of God’s Son in sacrificing Himself. But this message, however, is obscured by the mistranslation of his statement, “Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation [hilastērion 2435] through faith [faithfulness] in his blood” (v. 25). The Greek hilastērion appears only one other time in the New Testament, “And over it the cherubims of glory shadowing the mercyseat [hilastērion 2435]” (Heb 9:5). It’s the mercy seat in the holiest place of the Tabernacle where the high priest would enter only once per year on Yôm [H3117] Kāpār [H3722] or Atonement Day, “But into the second went the high priest alone once every year, not without blood, which he offered for himself, and for the errors of the people” (Heb 9:7), “the high priest entereth into the holy place every year with blood of others” (Heb 9:25). The mercy seat is the necessary context by which Paul’s intended message is understood. Since we can’t make the intended connection with the annual Atonement Day performed by the high priest under the Old Covenant, we don’t have the necessary context in our thinking to understand properly.

Making matters even worse, the Greek nouns ergon for “actions” and pistis for “faithfulness” are mistranslated in this chapter as “deeds” or “works” and “faith” or “believe” respectively: “Therefore by the deeds [ergon 2041] of the law” (v. 20); “Even the righteousness of God which is by faith [pistis 4102] of Jesus Christ” (v. 22); “Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation [mercy seat] through faith [pistis 4102] in his blood” (v. 25); “that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth [pistis 4102] in Jesus” (v. 26); “By what law? of works [ergon 2041]? Nay: but by the law of faith [pistis 4102]” (v. 27); “Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith [pistis 4102] without the deeds [ergon 2041] of the law” (v. 28); “Seeing it is one God, which shall justify the circumcision by faith [pistis 4102], and uncircumcision through faith [pistis 4102]” (v. 30).

By those two errors imposed upon this passage—the missing context of the annual Atonement Day, and the mistranslation of those two key words—Paul’s message has been corrupted into a different “gospel” message entirely. His own conclusion of what he taught in this passage, “Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith [pistis 4102] without the deeds [ergon 2041] of the law” (v. 28), is being misrepresented into a divergent conclusion—that salvation is by believing rather than working. It’s now being taught falsely that the deeds or works of the law was attempting to live morally righteous under the Old Covenant law but that under the New Covenant we’re saved simply by having faith or believing. People are being deceived into misunderstanding that they just can’t live morally righteous before God and don’t need to anyway because salvation is by faith alone. Furthermore, they’re even being discouraged from living morally righteous through fear that they might be trusting in their own righteousness and therefore not saved by faith alone. This error then leads into the next chapter teaching that Abraham was supposedly a great man of faith, “For if Abraham were justified by works [ergon 2041]Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness: (4:2,3).

The truth is that Paul wasn’t teaching an antithesis between working and believing, but an antithesis between the actions of the priests and the faithfulness of Christ—the priests’ actions of shedding the blood of animals under the Old Covenant, and Jesus Christ’s faithfulness in shedding His blood under the New. The ergon or “actions” were the high priest’s actions on Atonement Day of sprinkling the blood of bulls and goats on the mercy seat, while the pistis or “faithfulness” was Jesus Christ’s faithfulness to His Father in shedding His own blood upon the true mercy seat, “Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation [mercy seat] through faith [faithfulness] in his blood” (v. 25). There’s no such issue in Scripture of faith versus works, or believing versus meriting. The true antithesis is Christ’s faithfulness to give Himself as the Sacrifice for our sins versus the actions of the high priests under the law of offering animal sacrifices for sins.

Paul’s concluding point that we’re justified by Jesus Christ’s faithfulness in sacrificing Himself without the actions of the priests sacrificing animals, “Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith [faithfulness] without the deeds [actions] of the law” (v. 28), has been changed to something else entirely—that we’re justified by faith and not by living right. In fact, as it’s being taught today, living morally righteously is an attempt at saving ourselves apart from Christ’s sacrifice for our sins on the cross. Thus, not only is morally righteous living unnecessary for salvation, it’s even detrimental! Protestants everywhere are falsely assured of salvation by simply being a believer. Consequently, the standard of moral righteousness by which they’re taught to live isn’t the standard which Jesus Christ Himself upheld for entering the Kingdom, “That except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no case enter into the kingdom of heaven” (Mat 5:20).

What advantage did the Jews have?

What advantage then hath the Jew? or what profit is there of circumcision?” (v. 1). Paul just taught at the end of the previous chapter that if the circumcised don’t keep the law, their circumcision isn’t even counted, “but if thou be a breaker of the law, thy circumcision is made uncircumcision” (2:25), but if the uncircumcised keep the law they’re counted as circumcised, “shall not his uncircumcision be counted for circumcision?” (2:26), and that true circumcision before God isn’t a cutting in the body but a condition of the heart, “neither is that circumcision, which is outward in the flesh … circumcision is that of the heart, in the spirit” (2:28,29). Since that’s true about circumcision, it could be wrongly concluded that circumcision doesn’t even profit. Why then was Abraham and his descendants given circumcision? What advantage did circumcision give to the Jewish people over all other people?

The Jews heard first

“Much every way: chiefly, because that unto them were committed the oracles of God” (v. 2). The main advantage the circumcised Jews had over everyone else was the privilege of hearing the gospel of Jesus Christ first, “For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ … to the Jew first, and also to the Greek” (1:16). The oral reading of the Scriptures, “the oracles of God,” was restricted to the circumcised in the synagogues and in the Temple. To them was committed “the oracles of God,” therefore they were given the privilege of hearing Jesus Christ’s preaching first: “And when he was come into his own country, he taught them in their synagogue” (Mat 13:54); “And when he was come into the temple, the chief priests and the elders of the people came unto him as he was teaching” (Mat 21:23); “I sat daily with you teaching in the temple” (Mat 26:55); “And they went into Capernaum; and straightway on the sabbath day he entered into the synagogue, and taught” (Mar 1:21); “And when the sabbath day was come, he began to teach in the synagogue” (Mar 6:2); “And Jesus answered and said, while he taught in the temple” (Mar 12:35); “I was daily with you in the temple teaching” (Mar 14:49); “as his custom was, he went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and stood up for to read” (Luk 4:16); “And it came to pass also on another sabbath, that he entered into the synagogue and taught” (Luk 6:6); “These things said he in the synagogue, as he taught in Capernaum” (Jhn 6:59); “And he taught daily in the temple” (Luk 19:47); “And it came to pass, that on one of those days, as he taught the people in the temple, and preached the gospel” (Luk 20:1); “And in the day time he was teaching in the temple” (Luk 21:37); “Now about the midst of the feast Jesus went up into the temple, and taught” (Jhn 7:14); “And early in the morning he came again into the temple, and all the people came unto him; and he sat down, and taught them” (Jhn 8:2); “I spake openly to the world; I ever taught in the synagogue, and in the temple” (Jhn 18:20).

The Jews were given this advantage of hearing the gospel first, not only in their own land from Jesus Christ Himself, but also in distant lands from the apostle Paul: “they came to Antioch in Pisidia, and went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and sat down. And after the reading of the law and the prophets” (Act 13:14-15); “And it came to pass in Iconium, that they went both together into the synagogue of the Jews, and so spake, that a great multitude both of the Jews and also of the Greeks believed [trusted]” (Act 14:1); “they came to Thessalonica, where was a synagogue of the Jews: And Paul, as his manner was, went in unto them, and three sabbath days reasoned with them out of the scriptures” (Act 17:1-2); “And the brethren immediately sent away Paul and Silas by night unto Berea: who coming thither went into the synagogue of the Jews” (Act 17:10); “Therefore disputed he in the synagogue with the Jews, and with the devout persons, and in the market daily with them that met with him” (Act 17:17); “And he reasoned in the synagogue every sabbath, and persuaded the Jews and the Greeks” (Act 18:4); “And he came to Ephesus, and left them there: but he himself entered into the synagogue, and reasoned with the Jews” (Act 18:19); “And he went into the synagogue, and spake boldly for the space of three months, disputing and persuading the things concerning the kingdom of God” (Act 19:8).

Circumcision along with the keeping of the Sabbath day ensured that the Jews would be the first to hear the gospel in every city because the reading of the law was in the synagogue on the Sabbath. And because the religious leaders in every city were the Jews, it would have been wrong for Paul to begin preaching and teaching the gospel to the Gentiles first. Therefore, Paul always gave the Jews first opportunity to hear with the hope of receiving then teaching it to the people themselves. But when they refused the message, they couldn’t legitimately argue against Paul turning his attention from them and reaching the people himself. This same principle is true in households. Nobody should enter a house and begin reaching a family without going to the head of that household first. If the head hears first and listens, then they will teach their own family. But if they won’t listen, then they can be bypassed to reach their family.

Speaking of my own personal experience, I wrote a paper titled “True Theology” in which I presented from the Scriptures the true view of God and His Son Jesus Christ. I presented this paper to the pastors of my Baptist church with the hope they would repent of their false Trinitarian view and worship the true God. However, when they rejected the message and the messenger, I was then free to reach anyone in that church with the message. Of course, they could certainly ban the messenger from their building but they couldn’t bar the message from their people. This was the conflict Paul experienced everywhere he preached—although he was bound, his message couldn’t be, “Wherein I suffer trouble, as an evil doer, even unto bonds; but the word of God is not bound” (2Ti 2:9).

God’s faithfulness to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob

“For what if some did not believe [apisteō 569]? shall their unbelief [apistia 570] make the faith [pistis 4102] of God without effect?” (v. 3). The Greek apisteō is the verb form of the adjective apistos which is simply the negation of the adjective pistos for “faithful,” “loyal,” or “trustworthy.” Its noun form is apistia which is “unfaithfulness.” Paul’s question is rendered more correctly as “What if some were unfaithful? Will their unfaithfulness nullify God’s faithfulness?” (NIV). His Jewish brethren would argue that Jesus of Nazareth must not be who He claimed to be since He was rejected by all the synagogues without exception. But Paul’s reply is that the Son of God doesn’t need a seal of approval from the Jews in the synagogues. His approval was from His Father by the miracles He did through Him: “the works which the Father hath given me to finish, the same works that I do, bear witness of me, that the Father hath sent me” (Jhn 5:36); “him hath God the Father sealed” (Jhn 6:27); “If I do not the works of my Father, believe [trust] me not” (Jhn 10:37).

Christ preached His gospel in their synagogues for their benefit, so they would hear first and receive Him as their Messiah sent from God. However, they were unfaithful to God in not receiving the one He sent: “And when he was come into his own country, he taught them in their synagogue … And he did not many mighty works there because of their unbelief [apistia 570]” (Mat 13:54,58); “And when the sabbath day was come, he began to teach in the synagogue … And he marvelled because of their unbelief [apistia 570]” (Mar 6:2,6); “And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up: and, as his custom was, he went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and stood up for to read … And all they in the synagogue, when they heard these things, were filled with wrath” (Luk 4:16,28).

Paul asks, “shall their unbelief [unfaithfulness] make the faith [faithfulness] of God without effect?” What does their unfaithfulness matter to God? Is their unfaithfulness in rejecting His Son going to abrogate His faithfulness to their fathers Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob? Of course not! He simply fulfilled His faithfulness to their fathers through Gentiles instead.

Let God be true

“God forbid: yea, let God be true, but every man a liar; as it is written, That thou mightest be justified in thy sayings, and mightest overcome when thou art judged” (v. 4). Because Paul’s enemies—his fellow Jewish brethren opposed to the gospel message he preached—were desperate for anything to malign him, they falsely accused him of promoting evil for a greater good, “Let us do evil, that good may come” (v. 8). That “our unrighteousness commend the righteousness of God” (v. 5), is that his message supposedly was for us to actually live in unrighteousness so that God’s righteousness would be magnified.

By “let God be true, but every man a liar,” Paul was stating that God is simply shown to be true when judging men as liars. God isn’t judging sin to get glory for Himself. Paul will say a little later “if the truth of God hath more abounded through my lie unto his glory” (v. 7), to clarify that in no way is God getting more glory by men lying even more! Rather, that God is proven to be true, “let God be true,” when exposing men as liars.

Justified in His sayings

“God forbid: yea, let God be true, but every man a liar; as it is written, That thou mightest be justified in thy sayings, and mightest overcome when thou art judged” (v. 4). Paul is now going to bolster his earlier point, “Who will render to every man according to his deeds [actions]” (2:6). It’s the actions of good or evil that God will judge without showing any respect of the person committing the actions, “Tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man that doeth evil, of the Jew first, and also of the Gentile; But glory, honour, and peace, to every man that worketh good, to the Jew first, and also to the Gentile: For there is no respect of persons with God” (2:9-11). He now quotes from David, arguably the greatest Jewish man in Israel’s history, to substantiate that God is no respecter of persons in judgment. If God was shown to be true by exposing even the greatest of all Jews as a liar, then the same follows for all other men, “every man a liar.” David committed adultery with Bathsheba, committed murder by having her husband Uriah killed in battle, then lied about it all to cover it up.

It was when David finally repented of his sin that he exclaimed, “Against thee, thee only, have I sinned, and done this evil in thy sight: that thou mightest be justified when thou speakest, and be clear when thou judgest” (Psa 51:4). Second Samuel chapter 12 records God sending the prophet Nathan to tell David a parable about a rich man that took the only lamb of a poor man, then killed that lamb to feed one of his guests. And David reacted in anger upon hearing it, “As the LORD liveth, the man that hath done this thing shall surely die” (2Sa 12:5). But, of course, he hadn’t been made privy to the fact that he was the subject of the story, “And Nathan said to David, Thou art the man” (2Sa 12:7). This parable brought out from David’s own mouth the truth he had been hiding in his heart, “Behold, thou desirest truth in the inward parts: and in the hidden part thou shalt make me to know wisdom” (Psa 51:6). In hearing a story supposedly about another man, it compelled David to judge evil actions objectively without respect of persons—without respect of the person being himself!

This goes back to what Paul stated earlier, “Which shew the work [action] of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and their thoughts the mean while accusing or else excusing one another” (2:15). The law was written in David’s heart—he knew in his heart that his actions had been evil as defined by the law. And in accusing this “other” man, he accused himself.

God’s wisdom in using Nathan’s parable to expose David’s heart, “in the hidden part thou shalt make me to know wisdom” (Psa 51:6), was demonstrative and prophetic of the parables Jesus Christ would one day use to uncover the corrupt hearts of the Jewish leaders in His day. Jesus told the chief priests, elders, and Pharisees a parable about a man who sent his two sons to work in his vineyard, “Whether of them twain did the will of his father? They say unto him, The first. Jesus saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, That the publicans and the harlots go into the kingdom of God before you.” (Mat 21:31). Out of their own mouths they judged themselves unworthy. Therefore, Christ’s saying caused them to justify God in turning to the Gentiles. He then told them another parable of a householder that planted a vineyard, “When the lord therefore of the vineyard cometh, what will he do unto those husbandmen? They say unto him, He will miserably destroy those wicked men, and will let out his vineyard unto other husbandmen, which shall render him the fruits in their seasons” (Mat 21:40-41). They judged themselves worthy of death while justifying God in giving His “vineyard” to Gentiles. Christ’s parables or sayings caused these wicked men to unwittingly justify Him, “That thou mightest be justified in thy sayings.”

David’s sin being exposed caused him to recognize that circumcision in his flesh made him no better than any other man. Nathan’s parable about the two men said nothing of their flesh, whether they were circumcised or uncircumcised, “There were two men in one city; the one rich, and the other poor” (2Sa 12:1). It was just a rich man and a poor man and their actions toward one another.

With Uriah out in battle and his wife now expecting, it would eventually be known that the baby wasn’t his. Therefore, David brought him home so that he would sleep with his wife and make it appear that it was. But Uriah’s righteous actions proved to be David’s undoing. In honor for the Ark, the Israelites, the Jews, his commander, and his fellow servants, he wouldn’t sleep with his wife while they were sleeping in the open fields, “The ark, and Israel, and Judah, abide in tents; and my lord Joab, and the servants of my lord, are encamped in the open fields; shall I then go into mine house, to eat and to drink, and to lie with my wife? as thou livest, and as thy soul liveth, I will not do this thing.” (2Sa 11:11). His actions were honorable but David’s sinful. And all the while he had been sleeping in the open fields, David had been sleeping with his wife! The next night, David stooped even lower that “he made him drunk” (2Sa 11:13), yet Uriah still wouldn’t go home to his wife. Of course, David finally resolved to just have Uriah killed in battle so it would appear the baby was his—that while he had been home for a few days that he had slept with his wife.

David’s statement “Behold, I was shapen in iniquity; and in sin did my mother conceive me” (Psa 51:5), along with Paul’s teaching later in Romans, “Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned” (5:12), are used to claim we’re conceived with some kind of sin nature inherited from Adam. David, however, wasn’t talking about an innate sin nature but simply the natural state of all men, “uncircumcision which is by nature” (2:27). He came to recognize that while in the womb, there was no difference between him and Uriah the Hittite, and that circumcision in his flesh eight days after birth made him no better. Uriah’s actions proved more righteous than David’s. But David spoke other words to describe himself in the womb, “thou hast covered me in my mother’s womb. I will praise thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully made” (Psa 139:13,14). He certainly wouldn’t have been “wonderfully made” if he had been made with a sin nature! Are we actually created sinful? God forbid!

David committed murder to cover his adultery, then lied to try and cover it all. What did it ultimately matter that he had been circumcised on the eight day while Uriah hadn’t been? It’s ironic that the actions of a Hittite—which God’s people were supposed to have destroyed when they conquered the land—proved to be more righteous than the actions of the greatest Jewish man in the land. And if David didn’t get away with lying, nobody else will either, “let God be true, but every man a liar.”

The context of Paul’s quote from David, “For he is not a Jew [praise], which is one outwardly; neither is that circumcision, which is outward in the flesh: But he is a Jew [praise], which is one inwardly; and circumcision is that of the heart, in the spirit [breath], and not in the letter; whose praise is not of men, but of God” (2:28-29). Circumcised David wasn’t “a praise” in his actions, but uncircumcised Uriah was.

Our unrighteousness

“But if our unrighteousness commend the righteousness of God, what shall we say? Is God unrighteous who taketh vengeance? (I speak as a man) God forbid: for then how shall God judge the world?” (vs. 5-6). Paul wasn’t preaching, as falsely accused, that our unrighteousness commends or glorifies God’s righteousness. That message makes no sense. It would make God righteous in allowing sin and unrighteous in judging it! How would He even judge the world of sin if that were the case?

The truth of God

“For if the truth of God hath more abounded through my lie unto his glory; why yet am I also judged as a sinner? And not rather, (as we be slanderously reported, and as some affirm that we say,) Let us do evil, that good may come? whose damnation is just.” (vs. 7-8). Because Paul’s enemies accused him of false doctrine and sin, he proceeds to take their accusation to the logical conclusion to prove its absurdity. If he truly is a liar as they say, and lying glorifies God, then he’s glorifying God through his lying and therefore shouldn’t be judged as a sinner. The very thing his enemies accused him of, taken to its logical conclusion, actually vindicates him of their accusations. If lying ultimately glorifies God, and he’s a liar, then he’s glorifying God!

That his enemies had nothing legitimately against him was supported by the judicial trials he endured. All of his imprisonments and hearings before various judges and rulers that consummated at the highest court in Rome, proved that nothing could be found against him. Therefore, since their accusations against him were groundless, then his gospel message was exonerated. Jesus Christ said, “Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake” (Mat 5:11). And Peter likewise, “Having a good conscience; that, whereas they speak evil of you, as of evildoers, they may be ashamed that falsely accuse your good conversation in Christ” (1Pe 3:16).

By “whose damnation is just,” Paul wasn’t saying that damnation is just for those slanderously reporting him of saying something he didn’t say, but for those doing what Paul was slanderously reported of saying. He was making it clear that not only he wasn’t saying such things as accused, but that damnation is just for anyone doing such things—doing evil so that some kind of greater good would come from it.

Are the Jews better than the Greeks?

“What then? are we better than they? No, in no wise: for we have before proved both Jews and Gentiles [hellēn 1672], that they are all under sin” (v. 9). Although translated here as “Gentiles,” it’s the word hellēn for the Greek people specifically. And Paul compared the Jews with the Greeks other times in his letter: “For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth [trusts]; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek [hellēn 1672]” (1:16); “Tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man that doeth evil, of the Jew first, and also of the Gentile [hellēn 1672]; But glory, honour, and peace, to every man that worketh good, to the Jew first, and also to the Gentile [hellēn 1672]” (2:9-10); “For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek [hellēn 1672]: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him” (10:12).

The Jews had many advantages over the Greeks, “What advantage then hath the Jew? or what profit is there of circumcision? Much every way” (vs. 1,2). Their primary advantage was that they were given the first opportunity to hear Christ’s gospel message of salvation, “the gospel of Christ … to the Jew first, and also to the Greek” (1:16). But did their many advantages make them better than the Greeks, “What then? are we better than they?” Paul concludes that in no way were they better because “they are all under sin.”

All under sin

“What then? are we better than they? No, in no wise: for we have before proved both Jews and Gentiles [hellēn 1672], that they are all under sin” (v. 9). That “all under sin” is what Paul also stated to the Galatians, “But the scripture hath concluded all under sin” (Gal 3:22). It’s the Scriptures—which Paul is going to quote extensively in verses 10-18—that concluded all are under sin, “If they sin against thee, (for there is no man that sinneth not,)” (1Ki 8:46; 2Ch 6:36), “For there is not a just man upon earth, that doeth good, and sinneth not” (Ecc 7:20).

God’s people knew that they all had sinned because Moses commanded various sacrifices for sins: “But the flesh of the bullock, and his skin, and his dung, shalt thou burn with fire without the camp: it is a sin offering” (Exo 29:14); “And he brought the bullock for the sin offering” (Lev 8:14); “And Moses said unto Aaron, Go unto the altar, and offer thy sin offering, and thy burnt offering, and make an atonement for thyself, and for the people” (Lev 9:7); “And Aaron shall offer his bullock of the sin offering” (Lev 16:6); “And he shall make an atonement for the holy place, because of the uncleanness of the children of Israel, and because of their transgressions in all their sins” (Lev 16:16); “And this shall be an everlasting statute unto you, to make an atonement for the children of Israel for all their sins once a year” (Lev 16:34); “And by reason hereof he ought, as for the people, so also for himself, to offer for sins” (Heb 5:3); “Who needeth not daily, as those high priests, to offer up sacrifice, first for his own sins, and then for the people’s” (Heb 7:27); “But into the second went the high priest alone once every year, not without blood, which he offered for himself, and for the errors of the people” (Heb 9:7).

However, God said nothing to His people about offering sacrifices when He brought them out from Egypt, but simply that they must obey His voice and walk in His ways, “For I spake not unto your fathers, nor commanded them in the day that I brought them out of the land of Egypt, concerning burnt offerings or sacrifices: But this thing commanded I them, saying, Obey my voice, and I will be your God, and ye shall be my people: and walk ye in all the ways that I have commanded you, that it may be well unto you” (Jer 7:22-23). But because they were sinning, He added the requirement of sacrifices, “Wherefore then serveth the law? It was added because of transgressions” (Gal 3:19). Animal sacrifices was God’s mercy upon them when they sinned, otherwise it would have been “one strike and you’re out” so to speak. He allowed those sins to be covered so that they could continue living righteously before Him without sinning.

The teaching today that we’re saved by faith is bolstered by the claim that righteousness under the law meant keeping it perfectly without ever sinning even once—one strike and you’re out! Supposedly the law was given only to prove that nobody could live righteously, therefore concluding that righteousness is by faith. And James’ statement, “For whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all” (Jas 2:10), is one of the main proof-texts for that teaching.

James, however, wasn’t nullifying the righteousness of the law but upholding it. This is apparent by his injunction for keeping it all by simply keeping just one, “If ye fulfil the royal law according to the scripture, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself, ye do well” (Jas 2:8). Fulfilling all the righteousness the law required is accomplished by keeping just one law, “Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.” (Rom 13:9-10), “For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself” (Gal 5:14). James wasn’t saying that all the law just couldn’t be kept, but was reprimanding those that weren’t keeping it all. Keeping only some of it, and even keeping nearly all of it, still falls short of God’s requirement for keeping all of it. To “keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all,” is that keeping all but one is as if keeping none at all. It wasn’t that they couldn’t do it, but that they weren’t doing it.

There is none righteous

“As it is written, There is none righteous, no, not one” (v. 10). Paul now begins quoting repeatedly from the Scriptures a long list of Israel’s sins against God. But this first quote is a little difficult to place. Most likely it’s this statement from Isaiah, “Who hath declared from the beginning, that we may know? and beforetime, that we may say, He is righteous? yea, there is none that sheweth, yea, there is none that declareth, yea, there is none that heareth your words.” (Isa 41:26).

The Scriptures make the distinction between righteousness in an absolute sense and righteousness in a relative sense. The Son of God, our Lord Jesus Christ is absolutely righteous before God because He never sinned even once: “Which of you convinceth me of sin?” (Jhn 8:46); “For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin” (2Co 5:21); “was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin” (Heb 4:15); “Who did no sin” (1Pe 2:22); “in him is no sin” (1Jo 3:5). And He is the only one absolutely righteous: “THE LORD OUR RIGHTEOUSNESS” (Jer 23:6); “Of righteousness, because I go to my Father, and ye see me no more” (Jhn 16:10); “Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption” (1Co 1:30); “that we might be made the righteousness of God in him” (2Co 5:21); “For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust” (1Pe 3:18); “Jesus Christ the righteous” (1Jo 2:1).

That “There is none righteous, no, not one” is that until the Son of God came into this world, there wasn’t even one person absolutely righteous before God because all have sinned. But there were, however, those that were righteous before God in a relative sense. In the next chapter, Paul will use Abraham as our example of being counted or considered righteous by God, “For what saith the scripture? Abraham believed [trusted] God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness” (4:3). This righteousness by which Abraham was blessed, was also true of God’s people under the Old Covenant, “And it shall be our righteousness, if we observe to do all these commandments before the LORD our God, as he hath commanded us” (Deu 6:25). None of them were absolutely righteous, but when they walked with Him and kept His commandments, God considered it or counted it righteousness before Him.

God spoke through the prophet Ezekiel, “Though these three men, Noah, Daniel, and Job, were in it, they should deliver but their own souls by their righteousness, saith the Lord GOD … Though Noah, Daniel, and Job, were in it, as I live, saith the Lord GOD, they shall deliver neither son nor daughter; they shall but deliver their own souls by their righteousness” (Eze 14:14,20). God had told Noah, “Come thou and all thy house into the ark; for thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation” (Gen 7:1). Noah wasn’t absolutely righteous, but he was “seen righteous” before God, or considered to be righteous and treated like he was. Of Job and Daniel it was said, “Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil?” (Job 1:8; 2:3); “O Daniel, a man greatly beloved” (Dan 10:11). Noah, Job, and Daniel weren’t without sin, but were seen or considered righteous by trusting and obeying God.

Jesus Christ Himself and His apostles attested to people that were considered righteous before God: “Then Joseph her husband, being a just man” (Mat 1:19); “That many prophets and righteous men have desired to see those things which ye see” (Mat 13:17); “That upon you may come all the righteous blood shed upon the earth, from the blood of righteous Abel unto the blood of Zacharias son of Barachias” (Mat 23:35); “a certain priest named Zacharias, of the course of Abia: and his wife was of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elisabeth. And they were both righteous before God, walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless” (Luk 1:5,6); “By faith [faithfulness] Abel offered unto God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain, by which he obtained witness that he was righteous” (Heb 11:4); “And delivered just Lot, vexed with the filthy conversation of the wicked: (For that righteous man dwelling among them” (2Pe 2:7-8).

Peter made this conclusion about God’s righteousness concerning all people, “But in every nation he that feareth him, and worketh righteousness, is accepted with him” (Act 10:35). To “work righteousness” isn’t being absolutely righteous without having ever sinned. Christ stated, “That except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no case enter into the kingdom of heaven” (Mat 5:20). By “your righteousness,” He meant living to the standard of righteousness He taught in that very Sermon on the Mount. His expression “your righteousness” is equivalent to that used of God’s people, “our righteousness” (Deu 6:25), and of Noah, Daniel, and Job, “their righteousness” (Eze 14:14,20).

David’s writings

“There is none that understandeth, there is none that seeketh after God. They are all gone out of the way, they are together become unprofitable; there is none that doeth good, no, not one. Their throat is an open sepulchre; with their tongues they have used deceit; the poison of asps is under their lips: Whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness: Their feet are swift to shed blood: Destruction and misery are in their ways: And the way of peace have they not known: There is no fear of God before their eyes.” (vs. 11-18).

Paul now quotes a laundry list of sins from the Scriptures to prove “both Jews and Gentiles [Greeks], that they are all under sin” (v. 9). It’s no coincidence that he quoted David earlier, “that thou mightest be justified when thou speakest, and be clear when thou judgest” (Psa 51:4), and that almost all of these quotes are also from David: “The LORD looked down from heaven upon the children of men, to see if there were any that did understand, and seek God. They are all gone aside, they are all together become filthy: there is none that doeth good, no, not one.” (Psa 14:2-3); “God looked down from heaven upon the children of men, to see if there were any that did understand, that did seek God. Every one of them is gone back: they are altogether become filthy; there is none that doeth good, no, not one.” (Psa 53:2-3); “their throat is an open sepulchre; they flatter with their tongue” (Psa 5:9); “adders’ poison is under their lips” (Psa 140:3); “His mouth is full of cursing and deceit and fraud” (Psa 10:7); “For their feet run to evil, and make haste to shed blood” (Pro 1:16); “Their feet run to evil, and they make haste to shed innocent blood: their thoughts are thoughts of iniquity; wasting and destruction are in their paths. The way of peace they know not” (Isa 59:7-8); “there is no fear of God before his eyes” (Psa 36:1).

There’s a significance in David being the one who wrote these concluding statements in the Scriptures that all are under sin. Of course part of the reason is that he was proven of having sinned greatly in the matter of Uriah and Bathsheba. But there’s another compelling reason—he proved through his writings that God’s intent of fulfilling His promise to Abraham hadn’t changed regardless of the law having been added some 430 years later. Paul’s Jewish adversaries that rejected Jesus of Nazareth as their Messiah argued that the law itself was the fulfillment of the promise to Abraham. But what David said about 500 years after the law was given, set the record straight. God brought His people out of Egypt to live righteously in the land He promised to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. But now that they were settled in the land centuries later, they weren’t living righteously but sinfully. David’s writings indicted not only all of them but also himself!

The writer of Hebrews, quoted from the promise God made to Abraham, “By myself have I sworn … That in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed” (Gen 22:16,17), “For when God made promise to Abraham, because he could swear by no greater, he sware by himself, Saying, Surely blessing I will bless thee, and multiplying I will multiply thee” (Heb 6:13-14). He then proceeded to explain that God hadn’t changed His original intent of fulfilling that promise, “Wherein God, willing more abundantly to shew unto the heirs of promise the immutability [ametathetos 276] of his counsel, confirmed it by an oath: That by two immutable [ametathetos 276] things, in which it was impossible for God to lie, we might have a strong consolation, who have fled for refuge to lay hold upon the hope set before us” (Heb 6:17-18). The Greek adjective ametathetos means “changeless” or “unalterable.” There were two things God did to give us assurance or “a strong consolation” that He would fulfil His promise to Abraham in exactly the way He said—initially swearing by Himself to keep that promise, and later confirming it by an oath.

Paul’s last words written to Timothy, “Remember that Jesus Christ of the seed of David was raised from the dead according to my gospelIt is a faithful saying: For if we be dead with him, we shall also live with him: If we suffer, we shall also reign with him: if we deny him, he also will deny us: If we believe [trust] not, yet he abideth faithful: he cannot deny himself” (2Ti 2:8,11-13). If we deny that Jesus is the Christ, He absolutely will deny us and we will perish. Since He swore to Abraham by Himself, He would have to deny Himself to save anyone in any other way than what He promised to Abraham. He was faithful to keep what He promised, “he abideth faithful, he cannot deny himself.” Therefore, He won’t be denied, we will be.

In addition to swearing by Himself to Abraham, God also later confirmed an oath to David, “The LORD hath sworn, and will not repent, Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek” (Psa 110:4), “For those priests were made without an oath; but this with an oath by him that said unto him, The Lord sware and will not repent [metamelomai 3338], Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec” (Heb 7:21). The Greek verb metamelomai means “to change” or “to alter.” It’s equivalent to the negative adjective ametathetos for “immutable” which is “changeless” or “unalterable.” The oath spoken through David is the second of the “two immutable [ametathetos 276] things.” He was saying that He swore the promise by Himself to Abraham about a thousand years earlier “By myself have I sworn” (Gen 22:16), and the fulfillment of what He had sworn hadn’t at all changed, “The Lord sware and will not repent.” The law being interjected about halfway between the promise and the oath had no bearing whatsoever upon what God had promised. David’s writings after the law proved that the fulfillment of God’s promise to Abraham before the law hadn’t changed—it wasn’t by the law, but by His Son to come.

The oath, “Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek” (Psa 110:4; Heb 7:17,21), is “after the order,” in the sense of “arrangement,” “design,” or “pattern” of Melchizedek, “And Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth bread and wine: and he was the priest of the most high God” (Gen 14:18). This foretold of what Jesus would bring forth, “And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said, Take, eat; this is my body. And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, Drink ye all of it; For this is my blood of the new testament [covenant], which is shed for many for the remission of sins.” (Mat 26:26-28). Symbolically, the bread is His body and the wine is His blood. And only His blood can actually remit sins. Therefore, the Sacrifice for our sins isn’t the blood of animals given hundreds of years later through Moses, but the body and blood of Christ shown figuratively by Abraham partaking of the Lord’s Supper with Melchizedek!

The tongue is a little member

Their throat is an open sepulchre; with their tongues they have used deceit; the poison of asps is under their lips: Whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness” (vs. 13-14). It’s noteworthy that in this list of sins quoted from David, there are several statements about one particular part of the body—the tongue! James used the example of horses and ships to teach about the tongue, “Behold, we put bits in the horses’ mouths, that they may obey us; and we turn about their whole body. Behold also the ships, which though they be so great, and are driven of fierce winds, yet are they turned about with a very small helm, whithersoever the governor listeth.” (Jas 3:3-4). Horses and ships were the main modes of travel in that day. And as their final destination is determined by relatively small devices—bits and helms—as compared with what was being steered, so it is with our final destination, “Even so the tongue is a little member, and boasteth great things. Behold, how great a matter a little fire kindleth! And the tongue is a fire, a world of iniquity: so is the tongue among our members, that it defileth the whole body, and setteth on fire the course of nature; and it is set on fire of hell [geenna 1067]” (Jas 3:5-6). The tongue is a relatively small member of our body yet leads the whole body on a straight course to geenna or the lake of fire, “And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame” (Luk 16:24).

The Scripture has concluded all under sin

This list of sins from David’s writings is what Paul meant when writing to the Galatians, “But the scripture hath concluded all under sin” (Gal 3:22). And there’s a reason the Scriptures concluded all have sinned, “But the scripture hath concluded all under sin, that the promise by faith [faithfulness] of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe [trust],” “because of the faithfulness of Jesus Christ” (NET). God concluded all under sin so that the promise He made to Abraham, fulfilled by Jesus Christ’s faithfulness, might be given to those that trust Him. But this isn’t what’s being taught today.

The “gospel” message today is essentially informing people that they have sinned, “all under sin” (v. 9), “For all have sinned” (v. 23), then instructing them to be saved by believing, “The just shall live by faith” (1:17), “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved” (10:9). But this isn’t what Paul taught in Romans. His gospel message was that God concluded all under sin so that all can be saved by Jesus Christ’s faithfulness, and Jesus Christ’s faithfulness was the fulfillment of the promise God made to Abraham. There is no other gospel than the gospel that was preached to Abraham, “And the scripture, foreseeing that God would justify the heathen through faith [faithfulness], preached before the gospel unto Abraham, saying, In thee shall all nations be blessed” (Gal 3:8). It’s not about our faith, but Jesus Christ’s faithfulness.

All the world became guilty

“Now we know that what things soever the law saith, it saith to them who are under the law: that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God” (v. 19). It goes without saying that the Scriptures are speaking directly to God’s people, “them who are under the law.” But through indicting every one of His people with the guilt of sin, by transmission God relegated all the world guilty of sin. Paul will give more explanation about this later, “Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned: (For until the law sin was in the world: but sin is not imputed when there is no law” (5:12-13). Nobody questions that Adam was guilty of sin and worthy of death being sentenced upon him, but how is God just in passing that same judgment upon everyone else? It’s because “for that all have sinned” (5:12), which Paul was simply quoting his own conclusion here, “all under sin” (v. 9), “all have sinned” (v. 23). Since God would later prove through the law that all are guilty of sin, He was therefore just in passing judgment upon all in the beginning. Although “sin is not imputed when there is no law” and most people who’ve lived never lived under the law, yet all people die because God’s people were proven worthy of death, “Who knowing the judgment of God, that they which commit such things are worthy of death” (1:32).

The sense is that if given the same blessings and favor as His own people had been given, all other people would have also sinned. God’s people were somewhat of a case group to prove that all people would have done likewise. If they came up short even with every advantage to succeed, then all others with less advantage come short of God’s glory as well.

The actions of the law

“Therefore by the deeds [ergon 2041] of the law there shall no flesh [sarx 4561] be justified in his sight: for by the law is the knowledge of sin” (v. 20). Because there are two main distinctions within the law of Moses—the moral righteousness of the law, and the non-moral actions of the law—in this chapter the actions of the law, “the deeds [ergon 2041] of the law” (v. 20), “By what law? of works [ergon 2041]?” (v. 27), “without the deeds [ergon 2041] of the law” (v. 28), are simply the actions of the Levitical priests offering animal sacrifices.

In the letter to the Hebrews, “dead actions” were the actions of the high priest on Yom Kippur, the annual Day of Atonement. This is what is meant by, “not laying again the foundation of repentance from dead [nekros 3498] works [ergon 2041], and of faith [faithfulness] toward God, Of the doctrine of baptisms [baptismos 909], and of laying on of hands” (Heb 6:1-2). The high priest would “wash his flesh in water” (Lev 16:4), “wash his flesh with water” (Lev 16:24), both before and after the ritual on that day. This is the “baptisms [baptismos 909]” or washings. He would then sprinkle the blood of the goat for the sin offering upon the mercy seat in the most holy place, “Then shall he kill the goat of the sin offering, that is for the people, and bring his blood within the vail, and do with that blood as he did with the blood of the bullock, and sprinkle it upon the mercy seat, and before the mercy seat” (Lev 16:15). After that he would lay his hands on the head of the other goat, confessing the sins of the people over him before sending him out into the desert, “And Aaron shall lay both his hands upon the head of the live goat, and confess over him all the iniquities of the children of Israel, and all their transgressions in all their sins, putting them upon the head of the goat, and shall send him away by the hand of a fit man into the wilderness” (Lev 16:21). This is the “laying on of hands.”

This annual Day of Atonement is described later in Hebrews in more detail, “But into the second went the high priest alone once every year” (Heb 9:7), “the high priest entereth into the holy place every year” (Heb 9:25). The “dead actions” on that day are the meats, drinks, washings, sacrifices, and laying on of hands, “Which stood only in meats and drinks, and divers washings [baptismos 909] … For if the blood of bulls and of goats, and the ashes of an heifer sprinkling the unclean, sanctifieth to the purifying of the flesh: How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit [breath] offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead [nekros 3498] works [ergon 2041] to serve the living God?” (Heb 9:10,13-14). These actions are “dead” because they can never take away sins, “For it is not possible that the blood of bulls and of goats should take away sins” (Heb 10:4), “offering oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins” (Heb 10:11). Christ’s actions, on the other hand, in offering Himself to God as our Sacrifice, “the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit [breath] offered himself without spot to God,” remits or takes away our sins.

The Hebrew verb kāpar means literally “to cover” or “to conceal,” and figuratively “to appease” or “to pacify.” It’s used both ways in its first two appearances in the Old Testament. The first time it’s the literal covering over the wood of the ark with pitch, “Make thee an ark of gopher wood; rooms shalt thou make in the ark, and shalt pitch [kāpar 3722] it within and without with pitch” (Gen 6:14). And the second time it’s figurative for the appeasing of Esau’s anger with a gift before Jacob met him face to face, “Behold, thy servant Jacob is behind us. For he said, I will appease [kāpar 3722] him with the present that goeth before me, and afterward I will see his face; peradventure he will accept of me” (Gen 32:20).

This word appears approximately 100 times in the Old Testament and is translated in the KJV as “atonement” around 70 of those times. In Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers particularly, it speaks of the blood of animals covering sins. Therefore, the law itself attested that animal sacrifices didn’t “take away sins” (Heb 10:4,11), but only covered them, like Noah covering the wood of the ark with pitch! The blood of animals was simply a means of appeasing or pacifying God’s anger until the blood of His Son would completely satisfy Him.

When God’s people were truly repentant of their sins and striving to live righteously before Him with a pure heart, the blood of animals appeased and pacified His wrath. However, when they were living sinfully and offering sacrifices ritualistically, their sacrifices meant nothing to Him: “Hath the LORD as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the LORD? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the fat of rams.” (1Sa 15:22); “The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the LORD” (Pro 15:8); “The sacrifice of the wicked is abomination” (Pro 21:27); “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? saith the LORD: I am full of the burnt offerings of rams, and the fat of fed beasts; and I delight not in the blood of bullocks, or of lambs, or of he goats” (Isa 1:11); “your burnt offerings are not acceptable, nor your sacrifices sweet unto me” (Jer 6:20); “I hate, I despise your feast days, and I will not smell in your solemn assemblies” (Amo 5:21).

No flesh justified in His sight

“Therefore by the deeds [actions] of the law there shall no flesh [sarx 4561] be justified in his sight: for by the law is the knowledge of sin” (v. 20). Paul used sarx for “flesh” in Romans several different ways: the outward physical body, “outward in the flesh [sarx 4561]” (2:28), “the infirmity of your flesh [sarx 4561]” (6:19), “weak through the flesh [sarx 4561]” (8:3); an expression for those living under the law but without God’s breath in their hearts, “in the flesh [sarx 4561]” (7:5,8:8,9), “with the flesh [sarx 4561]” (7:25), “after the flesh [sarx 4561]” (8:1,4,5,13); the biological, cultural, and ethnic distinctions between God’s people and all other people, “according to the flesh [sarx 4561]” (1:3), “my kinsmen according to the flesh [sarx 4561] … concerning the flesh [sarx 4561]” (9:3,5), “them which are my flesh [sarx 4561]” (11:14).

That “no flesh [sarx 4561]” shall be justified in God’s sight emphasizes God’s own people among all biological, cultural, and ethnic people groups. The non-moral “deeds [actions] of the law” are what were required by circumcision which concerned meats, drinks, holy days, feasts, tithing, and animal sacrifices. But if God’s own people aren’t justified by the actions of the law given to them by God Himself, then no other people are justified by those actions either.

Paul declared to the Galatians, “Behold, I Paul say unto you, that if ye be circumcised, Christ shall profit you nothing” (Gal 5:2). As if to say “Look at who’s talking to you!” “If I myself—a biological descendant of Israel, circumcised the eighth day, and keeping the actions of the law my entire life—couldn’t be justified by those actions, do you really think that you—Gentiles becoming circumcised as adults—can be justified by such actions going forward?” Whereas “I Paul” began “by the flesh” and was made complete “in the breath,” how can you accomplish it the other way around, “Are ye so foolish? having begun in the Spirit [breath], are ye now made perfect [complete] by the flesh [sarx 4561]?” (Gal 3:3)?

To be “justified in his sight” is what Paul meant by “the righteousness of God” (1:17, 3:5,21,22, 10:3), “his righteousness” (3:25,26), “God’s righteousness” (10:3). It’s not the things we consider right: “every man whatsoever is right in his own eyes” (Deu 12:8); “every man did that which was right in his own eyes” (Jdg 17:6,21:25); “The way of a fool is right in his own eyes” (Pro 12:15); “Every way of a man is right in his own eyes” (Pro 21:2); “All the ways of a man are clean in his own eyes” (Pro 16:2). It’s the things God considers right: “to do that which is right in the eyes of the LORD thy God” (Deu 13:18); “to do that which is right in mine eyes” (1Ki 11:33); “to do that only which was right in mine eyes” (1Ki 14:8); “David did that which was right in the eyes of the LORD” (1Ki 15:5); “Asa did that which was right in the eyes of the LORD” (1Ki 15:11); “doing that which was right in the eyes of the LORD” (1Ki 22:43); “executing that which is right in mine eyes” (2Ki 10:30); “Asa did that which was good and right in the eyes of the LORD his God” (2Ch 14:2).

David did what was right in God’s sight: “walk in my ways, and do that is right in my sight, to keep my statutes and my commandments, as David my servant did” (1Ki 11:38); “my servant David, who kept my commandments, and who followed me with all his heart, to do that only which was right in mine eyes” (1Ki 14:8); “David did that which was right in the eyes of the LORD, and turned not aside from any thing that he commanded him all the days of his life, save only in the matter of Uriah the Hittite” (1Ki 15:5). Except for his sin in the matter of Uriah, David did what was right before God. However, he didn’t always keep the actions of the law. On one occasion he ate hallowed bread, “How he entered into the house of God, and did eat the shewbread, which was not lawful for him to eat, neither for them which were with him, but only for the priests? (Mat 12:4). And even when he repented of his sin against Uriah, he didn’t offer an animal sacrifice, “For thou desirest not sacrifice; else would I give it: thou delightest not in burnt offering” (Psa 51:16).

When confronted by the Pharisees for having eaten with Gentiles and for instructing His disciples to work on the Sabbath, Christ responded both times by quoting from Hosea: “Why eateth your Master with publicans and sinners?” (Mat 9:11), “But go ye and learn what that meaneth, I will have mercy, and not sacrifice” (Mat 9:13); “Behold, thy disciples do that which is not lawful to do upon the sabbath day” (Mat 12:2), “But if ye had known what this meaneth, I will have mercy, and not sacrifice” (Mat 12:7). The gospel message Jesus Christ Himself preached is that showing mercy to people, not keeping the actions of the law, is what God desires, “For I desired mercy, and not sacrifice; and the knowledge of God more than burnt offerings” (Hos 6:6).

By the law is the knowledge of sin

“Therefore by the deeds [actions] of the law there shall no flesh be justified in his sight: for by the law is the knowledge of sin” (v. 20). The law, as Paul states here and several times later in his letter that the law gave God’s people the knowledge of sin: “by the law is the knowledge of sin” (v. 20); “where no law is, there is no transgression” (4:15); “sin is not imputed when there is no law” (5:13); “the law entered, that the offence might abound” (5:20); “I had not known sin, but by the law” (7:7).

Since “by the law is the knowledge of sin,” then by the law “there shall no flesh be justified in his sight.” That the actions of the law won’t justify any flesh in God’s sight was proven by those actions not justifying His own people. Since centuries after the law was given none were righteous before God according to David, then their actions of offering animal sacrifices didn’t take away their sins.

The righteousness of God without the law

“But now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets” (v. 21). Toward the beginning of his letter Paul had stated “For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ … For therein is the righteousness of God revealed” (1:16,17). The gospel Jesus Christ Himself preached revealed God’s righteousness. And Paul is now going to teach about the righteousness of God in detail through these next few verses, “the righteousness of God” (vs. 21,22), “his righteousness” (vs. 25,26). Israel hadn’t submitted themselves to God’s righteousness as Paul will state later, “For they being ignorant of God’s righteousness, and going about to establish their own righteousness, have not submitted themselves unto the righteousness of God” (10:3). They were trying to establish their own way of being right with God rather than submitting themselves to the way God Himself established and accepts. They needed to learn His way—the way His Son preached—then submit to it to be saved, “that they might be saved” (10:1).

The “righteousness of God without the law” is God’s righteousness without the animal sacrifices commanded under the law. However, because the two main distinctions of the law—the moral righteousness of the law, and the non-moral actions of the law—aren’t being distinguished but conflated as simply the moral righteousness of the law, therefore “the righteousness of God without the law” is being taught today that God’s righteousness is without morally righteous living but simply believing. But the context is clearly “the deeds [actions] of the law” (v. 20), the actions of the Levitical priests offering sacrifices for their own sins and for the sins of the people. That God’s righteousness is “without the law” is that it’s not by animal sacrifices prescribed by the law but by the Sacrifice of God’s own Son.

Being witnessed by the law

“But now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets” (v. 21). God’s righteousness “being witnessed by the law and the prophets” is that the law and the prophets testified that animal sacrifices never pleased God. “For thou desirest not sacrifice; else would I give it: thou delightest not in burnt offering” (Psa 51:16); “The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the LORD” (Pro 15:8); “The sacrifice of the wicked is abomination” (Pro 21:27); “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? saith the LORD: I am full of the burnt offerings of rams, and the fat of fed beasts; and I delight not in the blood of bullocks, or of lambs, or of he goats” (Isa 1:11); “your burnt offerings are not acceptable, nor your sacrifices sweet unto me” (Jer 6:20); “Will the LORD be pleased with thousands of rams, or with ten thousands of rivers of oil?” (Mic 6:7).

Also, God’s righteousness “being witnessed by the law and the prophets” is that the law and the prophets foretold of the coming sacrifice of God’s own Son. Moses’ first writing of the law alone contains many undeniable prophecies. God said in the beginning that the Seed of the woman would bruise the serpent’s head, “And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel” (Gen 3:15). Abraham’s two sons by two women foretold figuratively of the Old and New Covenants that would come from Abraham, “Abraham had two sons, the one by a bondmaid, the other by a freewoman … Which things are an allegory: for these are the two covenants” (Gal 4:22,24). Also, Abraham’s “sacrifice” of his son prefigured God’s sacrifice of His, “My son, God will provide himself a lamb for a burnt offering” (Gen 22:8). And Joseph’s life recorded in Genesis chapters 37-45 was allegorical and prophetic of Jesus Christ’s life.

Within the Levitical sacrificial system of the law, there were many types of the true Sacrifice of God’s Son to come, particularly the mercy seat upon which the blood of animals was sprinkled, “And he shall take of the blood of the bullock, and sprinkle it with his finger upon the mercy seat eastward; and before the mercy seat shall he sprinkle of the blood with his finger seven times … do with that blood as he did with the blood of the bullock, and sprinkle it upon the mercy seat, and before the mercy seat” (Lev 16:14,15). This was simply a type based upon God’s instructions for Moses to make everything pertaining to that sacrificial system after the pattern He showed to him: “And look that thou make them after their pattern, which was shewed thee in the mount” (Exo 25:40); “according to the fashion thereof which was shewed thee in the mount” (Exo 26:30); “according unto the pattern which the LORD had shewed Moses” (Num 8:4); “Who serve unto the example and shadow of heavenly things, as Moses was admonished of God when he was about to make the tabernacle: for, See, saith he, that thou make all things according to the pattern shewed to thee in the mount” (Heb 8:5). Now, although the Old Covenant came chronologically before the New Covenant, the New wasn’t patterned after the Old but the Old after the New. The Old owed its existence to the New and not the other way around. Without the New there wouldn’t have been the Old.

The prophets also wrote many specific prophecies about Jesus Christ—His birth, life, death, resurrection, ascension, and glorification: “For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell [the grave]; neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption” (Psa 16:10); “they pierced my hands and my feet … They part my garments among them, and cast lots upon my vesture” (Psa 22:16,18); “Thou hast ascended on high, thou hast led captivity captive: thou hast received gifts for men” (Psa 68:18); “The LORD said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool” (Psa 110:1); “the land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, and afterward did more grievously afflict her by the way of the sea, beyond Jordan, in Galilee of the nations. The people that walked in darkness have seen a great light” (Isa 9:1-2); “I gave my back to the smiters, and my cheeks to them that plucked off the hair: I hid not my face from shame and spitting” (Isa 50:6); “Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.” (Isa 53:4-5); “But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, though thou be little among the thousands of Judah, yet out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be ruler in Israel; whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting” (Mic 5:2).

The faithfulness of Jesus Christ

“Even the righteousness of God which is by faith [pistis 4102] of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe [pisteuō 4100]: for there is no difference” (v. 22). The Greek pistis isn’t “faith” but “faithfulness.” Therefore the “faith [faithfulness] of Jesus Christ,” isn’t about our faith in Jesus Christ, but Jesus Christ’s faithfulness to God, “the righteousness of God through the faithfulness of Jesus Christ” (NET). But because the faithfulness of Jesus Christ is being obscured in most all translations by rendering pistis as “faith,” nearly everyone has bought into the falsehood that salvation is by faith or believing.

Paul’s letter to the Romans isn’t about the righteousness of God by faith, but the righteousness of God by the faithfulness of God and His Son Jesus Christ, “the righteous person will live by his faithfulness” (Hab 2:4 NIV), “The just shall live by faith [faithfulness]” (1:17). In chapter three, however, the faithfulness of Jesus Christ is mistranslated in almost all Bible versions except for the New English Translation, “the righteousness of God through the faithfulness of Jesus Christ … the justifier of the one who lives because of Jesus’ faithfulness” (vs. 22,26 NET).

That Christ’s “faithfulness” is what Paul was emphasizing, indicates that everything Christ did and said was His Father’s will and not His own. To be faithful, loyal, or trustworthy, is simply to do exactly what one was sent to do. The Son of God was absolutely faithful to His Father as John recorded in his Gospel: “the Word was God” (1:1); “I and my Father are one” (10:30); “the Father is in me, and I in him” (10:38); “he that hath seen me hath seen the Father … I am in the Father, and the Father in me” (14:9,10); “thou, Father, art in me, and I in thee … we are one” (17:21,22). He always did the will of His Father: “My meat is to do the will of him that sent me” (4:34); “I seek not mine own will, but the will of the Father which hath sent me” (5:30); “not to do mine own will, but the will of him that sent me” (6:38); “I do always those things that please him” (8:29). And He always spoke what His Father had sent Him to speak: “he whom God hath sent speaketh the words of God” (3:34); “My doctrine is not mine, but his that sent me” (7:16); “as my Father hath taught me, I speak these things” (8:28); “I speak that which I have seen with my Father” (8:38); “For I have not spoken of myself; but the Father which sent me, he gave me a commandment, what I should say, and what I should speak” (12:49); “the words that I speak unto you I speak not of myself” (14:10); “I have given unto them the words which thou gavest me” (17:8).

This is the understanding of John’s famous introductory statement to his Gospel, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God.” (Jhn 1:1-2). The “word” is the gospel message of salvation God hid in a mystery by figurative language within the literal events of the creation narrative. The Son of God came into this world and performed that “word” or message that was from the beginning so perfectly that He can be called metaphorically “the Word.” That “the Word was God” simply speaks of Him representing God perfectly. John wasn’t saying that the Son of God is literally God Himself, but that He was the equivalent of God on this earth by way of faithfully doing and saying everything God willed.

God the Father sent His Son into this world to do and speak as He had been sent. Therefore, to be right with God we must fully submit to His Son—obey what He commanded and agree with what He taught. Our only hope is listening to God’s Son. But if we won’t listen to Him, we’re completely hopeless.

The promise through the faithfulness of Jesus Christ

“Even the righteousness of God which is by faith [faithfulness] of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe [trust]: for there is no difference: For all have sinned” (3:22-23). Paul wrote a parallel statement in his letter to the Galatians, “But the scripture hath concluded all under sin, that the promise by faith [faithfulness] of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe [trust]” (Gal 3:22). Both are about Jesus Christ’s faithfulness, “through the faithfulness of Jesus Christ” (Rom 3:22 NET), “because of the faithfulness of Jesus Christ” (Gal 3:22 NET). And it’s interesting to note, although purely coincidental, that not only both say the same thing but also both are 3:22!

The context of both statements is Abraham’s trust in God’s faithfulness to keep the promise He made to him and to his Seed: “Abraham believed [trusted] God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness” (4:3); “For the promise, that he should be the heir of the world, was not to Abraham, or to his seed” (4:13); “Abraham believed [trusted] God, and it was accounted to him for righteousness” (Gal 3:6); “Now to Abraham and his seed were the promises made. He saith not, And to seeds, as of many; but as of one, And to thy seed, which is Christ” (Gal 3:16).

Paul was teaching that God’s righteousness comes by the promise He made to Abraham, and He was faithful to keep that promise by His Son’s Sacrifice for our sins. But before sending His Son, God testified in the Scriptures that all—Jews, Greeks, and everyone else—had sinned, “But the scripture hath concluded all under sin.” He did this, not to condemn everyone but to save everyone, “For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved” (Jhn 3:17). Therefore, in both letters, “by faith [faithfulness] of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe [trust]: for there is no difference: For all have sinned” (vs. 22,23), “all under sin, that the promise by faith [faithfulness] of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe [trust]” (Gal 3:22), since all have sinned, then all can trust God for salvation through His Son’s faithfulness to die for their sins. And the only way of salvation is by knowing and submitting to His righteousness—the fulfillment of His promise to Abraham through the faithfulness of Him and His Son. That as “Abraham believed [trusted] God” (4:3; Gal 3:6), we also can trust God. And as God counted Abraham right with Him because he submitted to His way of righteousness, so it is with us.

There is no difference

“Even the righteousness of God which is by faith [faithfulness] of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe [pisteuō 4100]: for there is no difference: For all have sinned, and come short of the glory [doxa 1391] of God” (vs. 22-23). Paul’s statement “for there is no difference,” in context, is that there’s no difference between Jews and Greeks, “No, in no wise: for we have before proved both Jews and Gentiles [hellēn 1672], that they are all under sin” (v. 9). He even quoted his own statement “for there is no difference” later in his letter and stated clearly that it’s between the Jews and the Greeks, “For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek [hellēn 1672]: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him” (10:12). And he also compared the two earlier in his letter, “to every one that believeth [trusts]; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek [hellēn 1672]” (1:16), “upon every soul of man that doeth evil, of the Jew first, and also of the Gentile [hellēn 1672] … to every man that worketh good, to the Jew first, and also to the Gentile [hellēn 1672]” (2:9-10). By proving all have sinned, God provided all with salvation. Since there’s no difference in the sinfulness of all, then there’s no difference in the salvation of all.

Come short of the glory of God

The statement “For all have sinned, and come short of the glory [doxa 1391] of God” (v. 23), could mean either coming short of giving to God glory, or coming short of receiving glory from God. We tend to default to the former because wanting to give glory to God makes us look humble before others, while wanting to get glory from God sounds selfish. However, if we’re concerned about our image before people, we’re actually accomplishing neither—we’re neither giving glory to God nor receiving glory from God. But the correct understanding of what Paul wrote, is the one Paul meant.

The gospel Jesus Christ preached, “How can ye believe, which receive honour [doxa 1391] one of another, and seek not the honour [doxa 1391] that cometh from God only?” (Jhn 5:44), is that we should seek glory, honor, and praise from God, and not from people. John stated the same, “For they loved the praise [doxa 1391] of men more than the praise [doxa 1391] of God” (Jhn 12:43). And this was also Paul’s gospel. The context leading up to his statement “come short of the glory [doxa 1391] of God,” is that of seeking glory and praise from God: “To them who by patient continuance in well doing seek for glory [doxa 1391] and honour and immortality, eternal life … But glory [doxa 1391], honour, and peace, to every man that worketh good, to the Jew first, and also to the Gentile” (2:7,10), “But he is a Jew [praise], which is one inwardly [secretly]; and circumcision is that of the heart, in the spirit [breath], and not in the letter; whose praise is not of men, but of God” (2:29). However, Paul also used Abraham as our example of giving glory to God, “was strong in faith [faithfulness], giving glory [doxa 1391] to God” (4:20), but then concluded that we “rejoice in hope of the glory [doxa 1391] of God” (5:2), that we hope in anticipation of the glory we’ll receive from God.

Whether Paul meant giving glory to God or receiving glory from God by “come short of the glory [doxa 1391] of God,” is debatable. In fact, he might have even meant both. But if it is one or the other, the weight of the context and the conclusion favors the latter. It’s that since we all have sinned, then we all come short of receiving any glory, honor, and praise from God. And this also makes the most sense leading into Paul’s next point, “Being justified freely by his grace [favor] through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus” (v. 24). It’s by God’s favor toward His people the Jews that they were given the means of receiving praise from God, “he is a Jew [praise] … whose praise is not of men, but of God” (2:29).

God’s favor toward His people

“Being justified freely by his grace [charis 5485] through the redemption [apolytrōsis 629] that is in Christ Jesus” (v. 24). As learned back in chapter one, “By whom we have received grace [charis 5485]” (1:5), “Grace [charis 5485] to you and peace from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ” (1:7), the Greek charis means “favor.” It’s God’s favor toward His people above all other people as the word was used in the Greek Old Testament, “And how shall it surely be known, that both I and this people have found favour [charis 5485] with thee, except only if thou go with us? So both I and thy people shall be glorified beyond all the nations, as many as are upon the earth.” (Exo 33:16-17 LXX Brenton).

The Greek noun apolytrōsis is “a release” or “a liberation” from a bondage, particularly that of a debt. It’s essentially the payment of a debt. Paul used this word in a parallel statement made to the churches at Ephesus and Colossae, “In whom we have redemption [apolytrōsis 629] through his blood, the forgiveness [aphesis 859] of sins” (Eph 1:7; Col 1:14). The Greek noun aphesis is “a taking away” as in forgiveness. And the writer of Hebrews used this word when contrasting the blood of Jesus Christ with the blood of animals, “Now where remission [aphesis 859] of these is, there is no more offering for sin. Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus” (Heb 10:18-19), “For it is not possible that the blood of bulls and of goats should take away sins … offering oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins” (Heb 10:4,11). Only Christ’s blood “takes away” and forgive sins.

The sense of “the redemption [apolytrōsis 629] that is in Christ Jesus” is that His blood paid for the sins of God’s people that had never been “taken away” by the blood of animals, but had always remained before God as an unpaid debt. And the writer of Hebrews even stated this explicitly, “for the redemption [apolytrōsis 629] of the transgressions that were under the first testament [covenant]” (Heb 9:15). His blood redeemed the sins of God’s people under the Old Covenant that had transgressed or broke His commandments. This redemption in Christ Jesus is what Paul is going to explain shortly about God having “passed over” those unresolved transgressions that were left unpaid.

God’s mercy seat

“Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation [hilastērion 2435] through faith [faithfulness] in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God” (v. 25). The Greek hilastērion appears only one other time in the New Testament, “And over it the cherubims of glory shadowing the mercyseat [hilastērion 2435]” (Heb 9:5). It’s the mercy seat in the holiest place of the Tabernacle where the high priest would enter only once per year on Yôm [H3117] Kāpār [H3722] or Atonement Day, “But into the second went the high priest alone once every year, not without blood, which he offered for himself, and for the errors of the people” (Heb 9:7), “the high priest entereth into the holy place every year with blood of others” (Heb 9:25).

Most Bible versions render hilastērion here as “atonement,” “expiation,” or “propitiation” although a few state it correctly: “God presented him as the mercy seat by his blood” (CSB); “Whom God has sent forth a mercy-seat” (DARBY); “as a sacrifice of atonement; or as the mercy seat” (EXB); “whom God made publicly available as the mercy seat” (LEB); “God publicly displayed him at his death as the mercy seat” (NET); “Him God has made a seat of mercy” (NMB); “whom God did set forth a mercy seat” (YLT). By translating hilastērion as “propitiation,” “atonement,” or “expiation,” the understanding of what Paul was communicating in this passage is lost.

That Paul was teaching the true mercy seat of which Christ is the true High Priest is evident by what he will state later in his letter, “For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh” (8:3). What “the law could not do” was remit our sins because “it was weak through the flesh.” It was weak because the high priests themselves were powerless to overcome death, “For there is verily a disannulling of the commandment going before for the weakness and unprofitableness thereof … And they truly were many priests, because they were not suffered to continue by reason of death” (Heb 7:18,23). And it was weak because the high priests were sinful themselves, “But into the second went the high priest alone once every year, not without blood, which he offered for himself” (Heb 9:7). The “likeness of sinful flesh” is the sinfulness of those high priests. God sent His Son “for sin” or for the purpose of condemning “sin in the flesh” as a flesh and blood human being without sin.

Christ’s faithfulness to shed His blood

“Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation [mercy seat] through faith [faithfulness] in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God” (v. 25). That “through faith [faithfulness] in his blood” is about Jesus Christ’s faithfulness and not our faith, is attested by the context, “through the faithfulness of Jesus Christ” (v. 22 NET), “because of Jesus’ faithfulness” (v. 26 NET). But almost every Bible version has some form of “faith in his blood,” “faith in Christ,” “faith in him,” “through faith,” “received by faith” “those who have faith” or “believe in him.” However, the Common English Bible, the Complete Jewish Bible, and the New Testament for Everyone—which I can’t quote any of them because of copyright restrictions—have it correctly as “faithfulness.”

This verse isn’t about us having faith or belief in His blood, but about Him being faithful to His Father in shedding His blood. Paul is going to explain this in more detail later in his letter, that hidden in a mystery within Moses’ last words before his death was a prophecy about the faithfulness of Jesus Christ and the gospel message His apostles would preach, “But the righteousness which is of faith [faithfulness] speaketh on this wise … that is, to bring Christ down from abovethat is, to bring up Christ again from the dead … that is, the word [rhēma 4487] of faith [faithfulness], which we preach” (10:6,7,8). The three times Paul says “that is” indicates a correlation—that Moses’ statement corresponds to its fulfillment in Christ and to the preaching of the gospel by His apostles. In other words, Moses asking “Who shall ascend into heaven?” is “bring Christ down from above,” and “Who shall descend into the deep?” is “bring up Christ again from the dead,” and the statement “The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart” is the gospel message of Christ’s faithfulness His apostles were now preaching, “the word [rhēma 4487] of faith [faithfulness], which we preach.”

The Greek noun rhēma is “a speech,” “a discourse,” or “an utterance.” Here, it’s a speech about Jesus Christ’s faithfulness that Paul was preaching. Therefore, when he concluded, “So then faith [faithfulness] cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word [rhēma 4487] of God” (10:17), it was about hearing this discourse about Christ’s faithfulness from a preacher, “how shall they hear without a preacher?” (10:14). Hearing of Christ’s faithfulness comes by the preacher preaching about His faithfulness, “the word [rhēma 4487] of faith [faithfulness], which we preach.”

God “passed over” the sins of His people

“Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation [mercy seat] through faith [faithfulness] in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission [paresis 3929] of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God” (v. 25). Animal sacrifices could never take sins away, “it is not possible that the blood of bulls and of goats should take away [aphaireō 851] sins” (Heb 10:4), “offering oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never take away [periaireō 4014] sins” (Heb 10:11). The Greek noun paresis is mistranslated here as “remission.” It actually means “a passing over,” “a disregarding,” or “a letting go.” The English paresis which is “a paralysis” or “an impairment” is derived from it. The Passover during the Exodus taught this principle to God’s people: “when he seeth the blood upon the lintel, and on the two side posts, the LORD will pass over the door, and will not suffer the destroyer to come in unto your houses to smite you” (Exo 12:23), “It is the sacrifice of the LORD’S passover, who passed over the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt, when he smote the Egyptians, and delivered our houses” (Exo 12:27). This was just one of many ways that “the law was our schoolmaster to bring us unto Christ” (Gal 3:24). Its types and figures taught God’s people about the true Sacrifice to come.

Now, Paul’s adversaries would argue that if animal sacrifices didn’t actually pay for sins then it would make God unrighteous because He would have left sins unpunished yet saved people anyway. But Paul was arguing that in God’s forbearance, He “passed over” the sins of His people, anticipating His Son’s sacrifice would pay for those sins later. Therefore, God vindicated Himself as righteous for having “passed over” those sins because He didn’t leave them unpaid entirely but simply paid for them later.

The writer of Hebrews quoted Jeremiah’s prophecy about the New Covenant, “But this shall be the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel; After those days, saith the LORD, I will put my law in their inward parts, and write it in their hearts … I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more” (Jer 31:33,34), “This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them; And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more” (Heb 10:16-17). And he followed that quote stating, “Now where remission [aphesis 859] of these is, there is no more offering for sin” (Heb 10:18). The Greek noun aphesis means “remission,” “discharge,” or “release.” Therefore, sins that have been remitted need no more offerings made. And Jesus Himself used this word for His blood remitting our sins under the New Covenant, “For this is my blood of the new testament [covenant], which is shed for many for the remission [aphesis 859] of sins” (Mat 26:28), “And that repentance and remission [aphesis 859] of sins should be preached in his name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem” (Luk 24:47).

Peter and Paul both used this word in their preaching and teaching: “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission [aphesis 859] of sins” (Act 2:38); “for to give repentance to Israel, and forgiveness [aphesis 859] of sins” (Act 5:31); “To him give all the prophets witness, that through his name whosoever believeth [trusts] in him shall receive remission [aphesis 859] of sins” (Act 10:43); “that through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness [aphesis 859] of sins” (Act 13:38); “that they may receive forgiveness [aphesis 859] of sins” (Act 26:18); “In whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness [aphesis 859] of sins” (Eph 1:7); “In whom we have redemption through his blood, even the forgiveness [aphesis 859] of sins” (Col 1:14).

Sins that are past

“Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation [mercy seat] through faith [faithfulness] in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission [passing over] of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God” (v. 25). Under the Old Covenant, only one day of the year the high priest sprinkled the blood of a bull and a goat on the mercy seat in the holiest place of the Tabernacle, “the blood of the bullock, and sprinkle it with his finger upon the mercy seat … kill the goat of the sin offering, that is for the people, and bring his blood within the vail, and do with that blood as he did with the blood of the bullock, and sprinkle it upon the mercy seat, and before the mercy seat” (Lev 16:14,15). Atonement Day was a ceremonial atonement for the sins of God’s people that had been committed over the entire previous year, “For on that day shall the priest make an atonement for you, to cleanse you, that ye may be clean from all your sins before the LORD … to make an atonement for the children of Israel for all their sins once a year” (Lev 16:30,34). Of course, this was only a type of the true, “For Christ is not entered into the holy places made with hands, which are the figures of the true; but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us” (Heb 9:24). But as with the true, the type indicated a redeeming of past sins—the sins of God’s people over the past year. Atonement Day included a “passing over” of sins, God “passing over” the sins of the previous year to “atone” for them on this one day.

“And for this cause he is the mediator of the new testament, that by means of death, for the redemption of the transgressions that were under the first testament, they which are called might receive the promise of eternal [aiōnios 166] inheritance” (Heb 9:15). The Greek adjective aiōnios in this statement from Hebrews doesn’t mean “eternal” as in “without end” or “never ceasing.” Most of the 70 times this word is used in the New Testament it’s incorrectly translated as “eternal,” “everlasting,” or “forever.” That it doesn’t mean “without end” is shown by a few times where it can’t mean that: “according to the revelation of the mystery, which was kept secret since the world began [aiōnios 166]” (16:25); “In hope of eternal [aiōnios 166] life, which God, that cannot lie, promised before the world [aiōnios 166] began” (Tit 1:2); “For perhaps he therefore departed for a season, that thou shouldest receive him for ever [aiōnios 166]” (Phm 1:15).

It’s noun form aiōn appears almost 130 times and is usually translated as “forever” and even many times as “world.” But it’s simply “an age” as in “a period of time” or “an era” as it’s translated a couple of times, “That in the ages [aiōn 165] to come he might shew the exceeding riches of his grace in his kindness toward us through Christ Jesus” (Eph 2:7), “Even the mystery which hath been hid from ages [aiōn 165] and from generations, but now is made manifest to his saints” (Col 1:26). But the undisputable proof that it can’t mean “without end” is that the Lord Jesus Christ Himself used it with an end! He used this word for the current age in which we live that most certainly will come to an end: “The enemy that sowed them is the devil; the harvest is the end of the world [aiōn 165]; and the reapers are the angels. As therefore the tares are gathered and burned in the fire; so shall it be in the end of this world [aiōn 165] … So shall it be at the end of the world [aiōn 165]” (Mat 13:39-40,49); “Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world [aiōn 165]” (Mat 28:20).

Now, the purpose in correctly defining aiōnios is to state that “the promise of eternal [aiōnios 166] inheritance” (Heb 9:15) isn’t about an inheritance that has no end, but an inheritance that has been enduring throughout the ages. And the promise is what the writer referred to earlier, “For when God made promise to Abraham, because he could swear by no greater, he sware by himself, Saying, Surely blessing I will bless thee, and multiplying I will multiply thee” (Heb 6:13-14). It’s the promise of the inheritance God made to Abraham that has endured throughout the ages, “For if the inheritance be of the law, it is no more of promise: but God gave it to Abraham by promise” (Gal 3:18).

Romans and Hebrews are teaching the same message about Jesus Christ’s faithfulness: “Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation [hilastērion 2435] through faith [faithfulness] in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission [passing over] of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God” (v. 25); “the mercyseat [hilastērion 2435]” (Heb 9:5), “And for this cause he is the mediator of the new testament [covenant], that by means of death, for the redemption of the transgressions that were under the first testament [covenant], they which are called might receive the promise of eternal [age enduring] inheritance” (Heb 9:15). For God’s people to receive the promise of inheritance He made to Abraham, God “passed over” their sins while the fulfillment of His promise endured the ages until His Son finally came and remitted their sins.

That He might be just

To declare [endeixis 1732], I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth [pistis 4102] in Jesus” (v. 26). Paul now repeats what he said in the previous verse, “to declare [endeixis 1732] his righteousness” (v. 25). The Greek noun endeixis is translated here as a verb “to declare,” but it’s actually “a proof” or “an evidence” as rendered the other two times this word is used, “Wherefore shew ye to them, and before the churches, the proof [endeixis 1732] of your love” (2Co 8:24), “And in nothing terrified by your adversaries: which is to them an evident token [endeixis 1732] of perdition” (Phl 1:28). Many other Bible versions, on the other hand, have “to demonstrate” or “to prove.” It’s about God giving proof or evidence of His righteousness for having done what appeared to have been unrighteous, “To declare [prove], I say, at this time his righteousness … to declare [prove] his righteousness.”

God’s people had wrongly assumed that the blood of animals took away sins for them to die forgiven. Because if the blood of animals didn’t take away sins, then everyone dies in their sins and perishes. But the writer of Hebrews stated plainly, “For it is not possible that the blood of bulls and of goats should take away sins” (Heb 10:4). Since that’s true, that God’s people all died without their sins being taken away, then how could any of them be saved? Therefore, that “he might be just” is the question Paul is addressing. Since the blood of animals never took away sins, how was God just in passing over those past sins, “for the remission [passing over] of sins that are past” (v. 25)? In justifying us, God had to do it justly. And He would have been unjust had He forgave sins on the basis of the blood of animals. Since the blood of animals never took away sins, God would have been unjust in taking them away.

It’s now “at this time” that God gave proof of His righteousness, of His justness in passing over those past sins. And His proof was the Sacrifice of His Son, “But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us” (5:8), “In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because that God sent his only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through him” (1Jo 4:9). Although past sins had never been taken away, they were taken away now. Therefore, God was just in passing over them, forbearing and refraining His wrath, “through the forbearance of God” (v. 25), to be unleashed upon His Son instead: “Yet it pleased the LORD to bruise him” (Isa 53:10); “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” (Mat 27:46; Mar 15:34); “For he hath made him to be sin for us” (2Co 5:21); “being made a curse for us” (Gal 3:13); given himself for us an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweetsmelling savour” (Eph 5:2).

Jesus’ faithfulness

“To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth [pistis 4102] in Jesus” (v. 26). The Greek noun pistis is mistranslated here as a verb “believe.” But it isn’t at all about us believing in Jesus but about “Jesus’ faithfulness” (NET). This is mistranslated in over 50 English Bible versions to indicate having faith, believing, or trusting in Jesus: “those who have faith in Jesus” (NIV); “the one who has faith in Jesus” (NKJV); “when they believe in Jesus” (NLT); “who puts his trust in Jesus (NLV). But there are, however, a few English versions that render it more accurately: “who has faith in Jesus [or on the basis of Jesus’ faithfulness]” (EXB); “because of Jesus’ faithfulness” (NET); “everyone who trusts in the faithfulness of Jesus” (NTE); and the Complete Jewish Bible which I can’t quote here because of copyright restrictions. It’s not about God justifying us on the basis of our faith but “on the basis of Jesus’ faithfulness” (EXB).

Where is boasting then?

Where is boasting [kauchēsis 2746] then? It is excluded. By what law? of works [actions]? Nay: but by the law of faith [faithfulness].” (v. 27). Earlier Paul stated that the Jews “makest thy boast [kauchaomai 2744] of God” (2:17), “makest thy boast [kauchaomai 2744] of the law” (2:23). The Greek noun for “boasting” is kauchēsis and verb is kauchaomai. They boasted of being superior to all other people because God had revealed Himself only to them: “Ye worship ye know not what: we know what we worship” (Jhn 4:22); “TO THE UNKNOWN GOD. Whom therefore ye ignorantly worship” (Act 17:23); “in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God” (1Co 1:21); “having no hope, and without God in the world” (Eph 2:12). “Where is boasting then?” hearkens back to what Paul asked earlier, “What then? are we better than they? “No, in no wise” (v. 9). The Jews can’t boast of being better than the Gentiles because their own Scriptures indicted “that they are all under sin” (v. 9), “For all have sinned” (v. 23).

By what law?

“Where is boasting then? It is excluded. By what law? of works [actions]? Nay: but by the law of faith [faithfulness]” (v. 27). “By what law?” isn’t asking “By which law?” but “By what purpose of the law?” Is it by the purpose the Jews supposed that the law was an end in itself, or the purpose Paul declared later in his letter, “For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth [trusts]” (10:4)? Christ is the end purpose for the law. Without His faithfulness to fulfill it, the law would have served no purpose. That it wasn’t “of actions” but “of faithfulness” is that the law wasn’t given for people to be justified by their actions of abstinence from unclean meats, keeping of holy days, and sacrificing animals, but to be justified by Christ’s faithfulness in giving Himself as the one and only Sacrifice for our sins.

Not by actions of righteousness which we have done

When Paul wrote to Titus, “Not by works [actions] of righteousness [dikaiosynē 1343] which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost [breath]” (Tit 3:5), it wasn’t about moral righteous living because he had just stated earlier that we must live righteously, “For the grace [favor] of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men, Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously [dikaiōs 1346], and godly, in this present world” (Tit 2:11-12). The “works [actions] of righteousness which we have done” are the actions of righteousness commanded under the law— abstaining from unclean meats, keeping the Sabbath, observing the feasts, and offering animal sacrifices. That these are the actions in question is supported by the context of the letter, “Not giving heed to Jewish fables, and commandments of men, that turn from the truth. Unto the pure all things are pure: but unto them that are defiled and unbelieving [distrusting] is nothing pure; but even their mind and conscience is defiled” (Tit 1:14-15). Jewish men were commanding Gentiles to eat a diet pure from meats restricted by the law. But “Unto the pure all things are pure” is that all meats are pure to those that have a pure heart. However, to those with defiled minds and consciences, eating a diet pure from unclean meats accomplishes nothing. With God, what counts are pure hearts, “Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God” (Mat 5:8).

Paul was reminding Titus—a Gentile himself ministering to Gentiles in Crete—about the outpouring from Jesus Christ upon the Gentiles at Cornelius’ house, “renewing of the Holy Ghost [breath]; Which he shed [ekcheō 1632] on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour” (Tit 3:5-6), “poured out on us” (NET). Christ had shown Peter a vision of impure and unclean animals, then declared them pure and clean, “Wherein were all manner of fourfooted beasts of the earth, and wild beasts, and creeping things, and fowls of the air. And there came a voice to him, Rise, Peter; kill, and eat.” (Act 10:12-13), “What God hath cleansed, that call not thou common” (Act 10:15). Peter then preached to the Gentiles as he had to the Jews on the Day of Pentecost, and consequently witnessed the same gift of tongues poured out, “And they of the circumcision which believed [trusted] were astonished, as many as came with Peter, because that on the Gentiles also was poured out [ekcheō 1632] the gift of the Holy Ghost [breath]. For they heard them speak with tongues, and magnify God.” (Act 10:45-46).

Paul’s point to Titus was that God poured out the same gift upon the Gentiles as He did on the Jews yet “Not by works [actions] of righteousness which we have done.” The Gentiles at Cornelius’ house hadn’t been keeping the actions of eating a pure diet but were given the same gift as the Jews regardless. Therefore, “Not by works [actions] of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us,” isn’t dismissing morally righteous living, but the “actions” of righteousness required for the Jews under the law. Paul wasn’t at all nullifying morally righteous living.

Paul’s conclusion

Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith [faithfulness] without the deeds [actions] of the law” (v. 28). Paul now draws his conclusion from this passage that we’re justified by Jesus Christ’s faithfulness in sacrificing Himself, and without the priests’ actions of sacrificing animals. However, “justified by faith [faithfulness] without the deeds [actions] of the law” (v. 28), has been changed to something else entirely—that we’re justified by our believing and not by righteous living. In fact, it’s being taught that living morally righteous is even an affront to Christ in an attempt to save ourselves apart from His Sacrifice for our sins on the cross. Thus, we’re taught that not only is morally righteous living unnecessary for salvation, but that it’s even detrimental to it! Protestant “Christians” everywhere are falsely assured of salvation because they simply believe some facts are true. As a dire consequence, the standard of moral righteousness by which they’re taught to live is lower than what Jesus Christ Himself commanded in His Sermon on the Mount. And because of this, according to Christ, they won’t be entering into the Kingdom, “For I say unto you, That except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no case enter into the kingdom of heaven” (Mat 5:20).

Believing is essentially that God isn’t lying! Vast multitudes of Protestants assume they’re saved because they simply consider what God said is true. But that the Greek pistis in the New Testament isn’t “faith” but “faithfulness” is supported by the fact that nowhere in the Old Testament was anyone ever required to believe anything. If salvation is truly by faith, and nobody before Christ was ever required to have faith, then everyone before Christ perished! Enoch, Noah, Job, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Joshua, Samuel, David, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Daniel, all perished.

Saved by faith or by faithfulness?

This popular statement Paul wrote to the Ephesians, “For by grace [favor] are ye saved through faith [faithfulness]; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works [actions], lest any man should boast” (Eph 2:8-9), has been corrupted into a different message entirely. We’re taught it means salvation by our faith and not by our meritorious works of living morally righteously. However, the overall context of the letter is God’s plan of salvation from the beginning to have a chosen people saved by His favor in Christ that all other people would be made partakers.

God purposed from the beginning to choose a people to Himself, “According as he has chosen us in him before the foundation [casting down] of the world” (Eph 1:4). These people were redeemed through the blood of His Son according to the favor He bestowed upon them above all other people, “In whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of his grace [favor]” (Eph 1:7). They were given first opportunity to trust in the Messiah, then the Gentiles were also given opportunity, “That we should be to the praise of his glory, who first trusted in Christ. In whom ye also trusted” (Eph 1:13).

Therefore, the phrase “For by grace [favor] are ye saved” is specifically the favor bestowed upon God’s chosen people above all other people.  And “through faith [faithfulness]” is Christ’s faithfulness as Paul will state later, “This was according to the eternal [age enduring] purpose that he accomplished in Christ Jesus our Lord, in whom we have boldness and confident access to God because of Christ’s faithfulness” (Eph 3:11-12 NET). God’s purpose from the beginning was His Son’s faithfulness to shed His blood for His favored people, “In whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of his grace [favor]” (Eph 1:7). And God’s purpose endured the ages until finally being consummated on the cross.

The statement “and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God” has been debated ad nauseam about exactly what “the gift of God” is, whether it’s our faith or salvation itself. But neither is the correct answer. The gift is God’s own Son as He said of Himself: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son” (Jhn 3:16); “If thou knewest the gift of God, and who it is that saith to thee, Give me to drink” (Jhn 4:10); “Moses gave you not that bread from heaven; but my Father giveth you the true bread from heaven” (Jhn 6:32).

When Paul said “Not of works [actions], lest any man should boast,” it’s the actions of the priests in sacrificing animals for the sins of God’s people, giving them place to boast of themselves above all other people. Gentiles were uncircumcised and therefore alienated from Israel, leaving them without any hope of salvation, “ye being in time past Gentiles in the flesh, who are called Uncircumcision … being aliens from the commonwealth of Israelhaving no hope, and without God in the world” (Eph 2:12). But Christ’s death on the cross made both Jews and Gentiles into one corporate body of God’s people, “For he is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the middle wall of partition between us; Having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances” (Eph 2:14-15). The “middle wall of partition” is the vail of the Temple that was torn when Christ died on the cross, “the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom” (Mat 27:51; Mar 15:38), “the veil of the temple was rent in the midst” (Luk 23:45). Therefore, the High Priest’s actions on the annual Day of Atonement in sprinkling the blood of bulls and goats on the mercy seat, were ended. And that the “law of commandments contained in ordinances” was abolished are the ordinances commanded by circumcision, mainly abstinence from unclean meats, keeping the Sabbath, observing the feasts, and sacrificing animals. Therefore, “Not of works [actions], lest any man should boast,” is that the Jews can no longer boast in their actions because all people are saved by the faithfulness of God’s Son.

In his letters to the churches, Paul distinguished and contrasted the faithfulness of Jesus Christ from the actions of the law: “a man is justified by faith [faithfulness] without the deeds [actions] of the law” (v. 28); “no one is justified by the works [actions] of the law but by the faithfulness of Jesus Christ. And we have come to believe [trust] in Christ Jesus, so that we may be justified by the faithfulness of Christ and not by the works [actions] of the law, because by the works [actions] of the law no one will be justified” (Gal 2:16 NET); “For by grace [favor] are ye saved through faith [faithfulness]; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works [actions], lest any man should boast” (Eph 2:8-9); “not because I have my own righteousness derived from the law, but because I have the righteousness that comes by way of Christ’s faithfulness – a righteousness from God that is in fact based on Christ’s faithfulness” (Phl 3:9 NET). Unfortunately, his statements are being turned to a different message entirely just as Peter said, “As also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things; in which are some things hard to be understood, which they that are unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do also the other scriptures, unto their own destruction” (2Pe 3:16).

A simple paraphrase of “For by grace [favor] are ye saved through faith [faithfulness]; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works [actions], lest any man should boast” is that “For it’s by His favor toward you as His people that you’re saved through the faithfulness of His Son, and not of yourselves: it’s the gift of God, and not your actions so that none of you can boast over other people.” Satan’s ministers, however, fight the understanding of the true context of Ephesians so they can continue deceiving and damning people with their false message of faith from this popular “faith” verse. And the main way they keep the true context shrouded is by their false context of Calvinism, “According as he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world … Having predestinated us” (Eph 1:4,5). The doctrine of Calvinism isn’t an honest misinterpretation of statements about election, foreknowledge, and predestination, but a doctrine of devils concocted to confuse, deceive, and simply waste our precious time disputing over nothing and continuing down the broad way leading to destruction.

The God of both the Jews and the Gentiles

Is he the God of the Jews only? is he not also of the Gentiles [ethnos 1484]? Yes, of the Gentiles [ethnos 1484] also” (v. 29). In proving that all people have sinned, Paul spoke about both the Jews and the Greeks, “we have before proved both Jews and Gentiles [hellēn 1672], that they are all under sin” (v. 9), “For all have sinned” (v. 23). And in declaring that God is the God of all people, he now speaks of the Jews and all ethnic people in general. No longer is He the God of the Jews only, but He is now also the God of all ethnic people. Paul will later quote from Hosea a prophecy that God would call all ethnicities His people and not only the Jews, “Even us, whom he hath called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles [ethnos 1484]? As he saith also in Osee, I will call them my people, which were not my people; and her beloved, which was not beloved.” (9:24-25).

Salvation is ultimately about the one true God being the God of our lives: “I will be their God” (Gen 17:8; Jer 24:7,31:33,32:38; Eze 11:20,36:28,37:23,27; Zec 8:8); “I will be their God” (2Co 6:16); “I will be to them a God” (Heb 8:10); “God is not ashamed to be called their God” (Heb 11:16); “they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with them, and be their God” (Rev 21:3); “I will be his God, and he shall be my son” (Rev 21:7). If we’re obeying the commandments of His Son Jesus Christ and living by the truth He taught, then we can trust God to provide, protect, defend, and ultimately save us. God will be our God. Many want Him as their Savior, but not as their God. But He is only our Savior when He is our God.

Of course the first of the Ten Commandments to God’s people was, “Thou shalt have no other gods before me” (Exo 20:3; Deu 5:7). Repeatedly God warned them to not put other gods before Him: “And in all things that I have said unto you be circumspect: and make no mention of the name of other gods, neither let it be heard out of thy mouth” (Exo 23:13); “And it shall be, if thou do at all forget the LORD thy God, and walk after other gods, and serve them, and worship them, I testify against you this day that ye shall surely perish” (Deu 8:19); “Take heed to yourselves, that your heart be not deceived, and ye turn aside, and serve other gods, and worship them” (Deu 11:16); “And thou shalt not go aside from any of the words which I command thee this day, to the right hand, or to the left, to go after other gods to serve them” (Deu 28:14); “But if thine heart turn away, so that thou wilt not hear, but shalt be drawn away, and worship other gods, and serve them; I denounce unto you this day, that ye shall surely perish” (Deu 30:17-18).

Several times in His Sermon on the Mount in Matthew, Jesus directed His disciples to God their Father in heaven: “Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven” (5:16); “That thine alms may be in secret: and thy Father which seeth in secret himself shall reward thee openly” (6:4); “pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly” (6:6); “For if ye forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you” (6:14); “That thou appear not unto men to fast, but unto thy Father which is in secret: and thy Father, which seeth in secret, shall reward thee openly” (6:18); “how much more shall your Father which is in heaven give good things to them that ask him?” (7:11); “doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven” (7:21).

Christ told a Samaritan woman that although only the Jews had the knowledge of the true God, soon the true worshippers would worship God as the Father of the Lord Jesus Christ, “Ye worship ye know not what: we know what we worship: for salvation is of the Jews. But the hour cometh, and now is, when the true worshippers shall worship the Father in spirit [breath] and in truth: for the Father seeketh such to worship him.” (Jhn 4:22-23). And after His resurrection, He said that His Father is our Father, and His God is our God, “Touch me not; for I am not yet ascended to my Father: but go to my brethren, and say unto them, I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God” (Jhn 20:17).

The same God

“Seeing it is one God, which shall justify the circumcision by faith [faithfulness], and uncircumcision through faith [faithfulness]” (v. 30). Paul makes it clear that the Gentiles now serve the same God as the Jews. Understandably, it’s very difficult for the Jewish people to unlearn what has been instilled into them going all the way back to the Exodus. They have always viewed themselves as the people of God, the only people of God. The one true God revealed Himself to them through Moses and gave them commandments and ordinances under the mark of circumcision, and they supposed this to be the consummation of salvation. It’s hard for them to accept that this was only one piece, albeit a very large piece, in God’s plan of salvation from the beginning. That His overarching plan was for His Son to come into this world and die for the sins of the world so that all people would be saved, can be difficult for them to accept.

Sadly, the tables have been turned so that whereas it was the Jews that boasted of themselves over the Gentiles, “Behold, thou art called a Jew, and restest in the law, and makest thy boast of God” (2:17), Gentiles now boast of themselves over the Jews. Some “Christian” groups even teach that Gentiles replaced the Jews as God’s people! But Paul warned us to “Boast not against the branches. But if thou boast, thou bearest not the root, but the root thee” (11:18). The “root” is Jesus Christ bearing the entire tree, and the “branches” are the Jewish people among whom Gentiles are grafted. Our mindset toward the Jewish people shouldn’t be of boasting, but of mercy, “Even so have these also now not believed [trusted], that through your mercy they also may obtain mercy” (11:31). Our love, mercy, and peace toward them is what will help lead them to the truth and be saved.

Paul wrote to the Ephesians, “Endeavouring to keep the unity of the Spirit [breath] in the bond of peace. There is one body, and one Spirit [breath], even as ye are called in one hope of your calling; One Lord, one faith, one baptism, One God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all.” (Eph 4:3-6). All of these “one” statements aren’t about singularity but unity. In other words, he wasn’t teaching that there’s only one body as opposed to two or more, but that both Jews and Gentiles belong to the same body. This is substantiated a few verses later by the one body, “From whom the whole body fitly joined together and compacted by that which every joint supplieth, according to the effectual working in the measure of every part, maketh increase of the body unto the edifying of itself in love” (Eph 4:16). The words “There is” are italicized indicated they’re not in the Greek text but were added by the translators. But “There is” leaves the wrong impression that Paul was in fact teaching singularity with all of these “one” statements.

Paul was teaching that both Jews and Gentiles are members of the same body working together in unity, have the same indwelling breath from God, share the same hope of God’s calling, serve the same Lord Jesus Christ, partake in the same faithfulness of Christ, have been baptized into the same name, and have the same God and Father. This is what “the gospel of peace” means, “How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace” (10:15), “Endeavouring to keep the unity of the Spirit [breath] in the bond of peace” (Eph 4:3), “And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace” (Eph 6:15). It’s both Jews and Gentiles being at peace with each other by virtue of being saved by the preaching of the same gospel message. The same God that justifies the circumcised by His Son’s faithfulness, also justifies the uncircumcised through His Son’s faithfulness, “Seeing it is one God, which shall justify the circumcision by faith [faithfulness], and uncircumcision through faith [faithfulness]” (v. 30).

The law is established by Christ’s faithfulness

“Do we then make void the law through faith [faithfulness]? God forbid: yea, we establish the law.” (v. 31). Christ’s own words to His disciples, “Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfil” (Mat 5:17). And after He was resurrected, “These are the words which I spake unto you, while I was yet with you, that all things must be fulfilled, which were written in the law of Moses, and in the prophets, and in the psalms, concerning me” (Luk 24:44). He didn’t destroy the law but was the fulfillment of its very purpose as Paul will state later, “Christ is the end of the law” (10:4). He is the law’s very end purpose or fulfillment. Without Him it would have served no purpose, but with Him it served its purpose.

Now, the question naturally arises that since God has a Son and His purpose from the very beginning was His Son, then why not make that clear to His people all along? Why allow them to keep thinking that the law was His end purpose only to later spring upon them the truth, even knowing it would cause much perplexity and outright opposition? It’s because had God made known to us how He was going to save us, we wouldn’t have cooperated, “And now, brethren, I wot that through ignorance ye did it, as did also your rulers” (Act 3:17), “But we speak the wisdom of God in a mystery, even the hidden wisdom, which God ordained before the world unto our glory: Which none of the princes of this world knew: for had they known it, they would not have crucified the Lord of glory” (1Co 2:7-8). God kept His plan of salvation hidden and secret from us, because we would have messed it up! Therefore, He allowed His own people to wrongly accept the law as His way of righteousness so they would unwittingly fulfill His true way of righteousness for all people to be saved.

Paul will state at the end of his letter, “according to the revelation of the mystery, which was kept secret since the world began, But now is made manifest” (16:25-26). Christ revealed to Paul’s understanding the mystery that had been kept secret since the beginning, and Paul now divulged it here in this letter. Does Christ’s faithfulness to His Father’s plan from the beginning void or nullify the purpose of the law? Never! It establishes the very purpose of the law—to prove all are under sin so that all could be saved, “But the scripture hath concluded all under sin, that the promise by faith [faithfulness] of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe [trust]” (Gal 3:22).

The Word was God

The beginning statement of John’s Gospel is the favorite of Trinitarian ministers to teach that Jesus Christ is God Himself, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God.” (Jhn 1:1-2). But twice John said He was “with God” which corresponds with what he later wrote in his first letter, “That which was from the beginning … the Word of life … which was with the Father” (1Jo 1:2). John clarified that the Father is God and the Word was with Him.

The phrase “the Word was God” isn’t literal but a metaphor or figure of speech. Not only does the context contain other metaphors but this very phrase does as well. The Son of God isn’t literally “the Word” nor is He literally “the Light” (v. 7). These are metaphors. And just as “the light was the life” (v. 4) is a metaphor, so is “the Word was God.” He represented God to such perfection that He “was God” in metaphorical equivalence. He said of Himself, “he that seeth me seeth him that sent me” (Jhn 12:45), “he that hath seen me hath seen the Father” (Jhn 14:9). When people saw the Son literally, they were seeing the Father figuratively. His apostles also wrote, “Christ, who is the image of God” (2Co 4:4), “Who is the image of the invisible God” (Col 1:15), “the express image of his person” (Heb 1:3). He is the precise image, figure, or representation of God.

Not only Christ isn’t God Himself but has a God Himself—God the Father is His God as He called Him before He died, after He was resurrected, and after He was seated at His right hand: “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” (Mat 27:46; Mar 15:34); “I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God” (Jhn 20:17); “Him that overcometh will I make a pillar in the temple of my God, and he shall go no more out: and I will write upon him the name of my God, and the name of the city of my God, which is new Jerusalem, which cometh down out of heaven from my God” (Rev 3:12).

Several times the apostles called God the Father, Jesus Christ’s God: “God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom 15:6); “And ye are Christ’s; and Christ is God’s” (1Co 3:23); “the head of Christ is God” (1Co 11:3); “The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (2Co 11:31); “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Eph 1:3; 1Pe 1:3) “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Eph 1:17); “God and the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Col 1:3).

The writer of Hebrews wasn’t calling the Son “God” in “But unto the Son he saith, Thy throne, O God” (Heb 1:8). This was a quote from a passage in Psalm 45 which begins with “Thy throne, O God.” However, the part where God was speaking to His Son, “God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows.” God wasn’t calling His Son “God” but calling Himself His Son’s God!

It isn’t the Son but the Father that is called “God” in these places: “God my Saviour” (Lke 1:47); “God, who is the Saviour” (1Ti 4:10); “God our Saviour” (1Ti 1:1; 1Ti 2:3; Tit 1:3, 2:10, 3:4; Jde 1:25). Many times God is called the Savior of His people: “They forgat God their saviour, which had done great things in Egypt” (Psa 106:21); “Verily thou art a God that hidest thyself, O God of Israel, the Saviour” (Isa 45:15); “there is no God else beside me; a just God and a Saviour” (Isa 45:21); “I the LORD am thy Saviour and thy Redeemer” (Isa 49:26,60:16); “there is no saviour beside me” (Hos 13:4).

That Christ “said also that God was his Father, making himself equal [isos 2470] with God” (Jhn 5:18), was equality with God by virtue of having been begotten of God, “his only begotten Son … the only begotten Son of God” (Jhn 3:16,18). As a human son is equally human as his father but not in authority, so it is with the Son and His Father. Trinitarianism, however, teaches that they are coequal: “equal with another or each other in rank, ability, extent, etc.” Dictionary.com.

Christ isn’t God Himself but God’s Son. Many times Christ called God His Father and Himself His Son. And He never once called Himself “God” but did call His Father “God,” and the only true God, “thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom thou has sent” (Jhn 17:3). Likewise, the Father never called His Son “God” but twice from heaven—at His baptism and transfiguration—called Him “My Beloved Son.” What they said about themselves and each other is the truth and last word on the matter.

Can anyone be saved while knowingly disagreeing with the Savior? Trinitarian ministers are educated and intelligent. Don’t they know what the Savior said about God and about Himself? And if they disagree with Him, why listen to them?

10 Reasons the Doctrine of the Trinity is False

  1. Only God the Father and the Son of God know each other, and only the Son has seen the Father.
    • Only the Father and Son know each other: “All things are delivered unto me of my Father: and no man knoweth the Son, but the Father; neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son will reveal him” (Mat 11:27); “Ye neither know me, nor my Father: if ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also” (Jhn 8:19); “Yet ye have not known him; but I know him: and if I should say, I know him not, I shall be a liar like unto you: but I know him, and keep his saying” (Jhn 8:55); “As the Father knoweth me, even so know I the Father: and I lay down my life for the sheep” (Jhn 10:15); “O righteous Father, the world hath not known thee: but I have known thee, and these have known that thou hast sent me” (Jhn 17:25).
    • Nobody but the Son has seen God the Father: “No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him” (Jhn 1:18); “And the Father himself, which hath sent me, hath borne witness of me. Ye have neither heard his voice at any time, nor seen his shape.” (Jhn 5:37); “Not that any man hath seen the Father, save he which is of God, he hath seen the Father” (Jhn 6:46); “Who only hath immortality, dwelling in the light which no man can approach unto; whom no man hath seen, nor can see” (1Ti 6:16); “No man hath seen God at any time” (1Jo 4:12).
    • The Son called Himself “the Son of God” and the Father called Him “My Beloved Son.” The Son never called Himself “God” and the Father never called His Son “God.” Furthermore, the Son did call His Father “God” and even called Him “My God.” Finally, neither of them called the Holy Spirit [Breath] “God.” What the Father and Son said about each other is the final word. Who dare say otherwise?
  2. Jesus Christ taught that God is one Person.
    • Speaking to His Father, Jesus called Him the only true God, “And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent” (Jhn 17:3). He identified and categorized His Father as the only true God, and excluded Himself from the only true God.
    • Jesus affirmed what Moses wrote, “And Jesus answered him, The first of all the commandments is, Hear, O Israel; The Lord [kyrios] our God is one Lord [kyrios]” (Mar 12:29). The Greek kyrios appears about 750 times in the New Testament and is a lord, master, or ruler. Since “The Ruler” is “one Ruler,” therefore Jesus Himself attested that God is not three co-equal Rulers but one.
    • The Greek theos for “God” or “gods” is grammatically in the singular or plural form depending on the number of persons. One person requires theos to be singular while multiple persons requires it to be plural. This is simple grammar. And since Jesus always used theos in the singular when speaking about God, then God must be one Person. This is further bolstered by the fact that when He spoke about men as gods—more than one person as theos—He used the plural, “I said, Ye are gods [theos]? If he called them gods [theos]” (Jhn 10:34-35). Jesus Christ and the apostle Paul both used this word in plural and singular form even within the same statement, “I said, Ye are gods [theos]? If he called them gods [theos], unto whom the word of God [theos] came” (Jhn 10:34-35), “For though there be that are called gods [theos], whether in heaven or in earth, (as there be gods [theos] many, and lords many,) But to us there is but one God [theos], the Father” (1Co 8:5-6). Paul also emphasized that the plural is “many” and the singular is “one.” Since both Jesus and Paul understood and used theos as either plural or singular based on the number of persons, then the singular Theos is one Person.
  3. Scripture is replete with statements identifying the Father as God with many of these same statements also distinguishing the Son in distinction from Him as the Lord Jesus Christ: “No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him” (Jhn 1:18); “but said also that God was his Father, making himself equal with God” (Jhn 5:18); “for him hath God the Father sealed” (Jhn 6:27); “Not that any man hath seen the Father, save he which is of God, he hath seen the Father” (Jhn 6:46); “Jesus knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he was come from God, and went to God” (Jhn 13:3); “For the Father himself loveth you, because ye have loved me, and have believed that I came out from God” (Jhn 16:27); “Jesus saith unto her, Touch me not; for I am not yet ascended to my Father: but go to my brethren, and say unto them, I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God” (Jhn 20:17); “Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear” (Act 2:33); “To all that be in Rome, beloved of God, called to be saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom 1:7); “That ye may with one mind and one mouth glorify God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom 15:6); “Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ” (1Co 1:3); “But to us there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him” (1Co 8:6); “Then cometh the end, when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father” (1Co 15:24); “Grace be to you and peace from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ. Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort” (1Co 1:2-3); “The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which is blessed for evermore, knoweth that I lie not” (2Co 11:31); “Paul, an apostle, (not of men, neither by man, but by Jesus Christ, and God the Father, who raised him from the dead;)” (Gal 1:1); “Grace be to you and peace from God the Father, and from our Lord Jesus Christ, Who gave himself for our sins, that he might deliver us from this present evil world, according to the will of God and our Father” (Gal 1:3-4); “Grace be to you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ. Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Eph 1:2-3); “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of him” (Eph 1:17); “One God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all” (Eph 4:6); “Giving thanks always for all things unto God and the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Eph 5:20); “Peace be to the brethren, and love with faith, from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Eph 6:23); “Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ” (Phl 1:2); “And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Phl 2:11); “Now unto God and our Father be glory for ever and ever. Amen.” (Phl 4:20); “To the saints and faithful brethren in Christ which are at Colosse: Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. We give thanks to God and the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, praying always for you” (Col 1:2-3); “And whatsoever ye do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God and the Father by him” (Col 3:17); “unto the church of the Thessalonians which is in God the Father and in the Lord Jesus Christ: Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ” (1Th 1:1); “Remembering without ceasing your work of faith, and labour of love, and patience of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ, in the sight of God and our Father” (1Th 1:3); “Now God himself and our Father, and our Lord Jesus Christ, direct our way unto you” (1Th 3:11); “To the end he may stablish your hearts unblameable in holiness before God, even our Father, at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ with all his saints” (1Th 3:13); “Paul, and Silvanus, and Timotheus, unto the church of the Thessalonians in God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ: Grace unto you, and peace, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (2Th 1:1-2); “Now our Lord Jesus Christ himself, and God, even our Father, which hath loved us, and hath given us everlasting consolation and good hope through grace” (2Th 2:16); “Grace, mercy, and peace, from God our Father and Jesus Christ our Lord” (1Ti 1:2); “Grace, mercy, and peace, from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord” (2Ti 1:2); “Grace, mercy, and peace, from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ our Saviour” (Tit 1:4); “Grace to you, and peace, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Phm 1:3); “Pure religion and undefiled before God and the Father is this” (Jas 1:27); “Therewith bless we God, even the Father; and therewith curse we men, which are made after the similitude of God” (Jas 3:9); “Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father” (1Pe 1:2); “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (1Pe 1:3); “For he received from God the Father honour and glory” (2Pe 1:17); “Grace be with you, mercy, and peace, from God the Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of the Father, in truth and love” (2Jo 1:3); “Jude, the servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are sanctified by God the Father, and preserved in Jesus Christ, and called” (Jde 1:1); “And hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.” (Rev 1:6).
  4. The throne of God is the Father’s while the Son is seated next to Him on His right hand. We’re never told that the Father is seated on the left hand of the Son and we’re never told of a third Person seated on the throne with them: “Sit thou at my right hand” (Psa 110:1); “Hereafter shall the Son of man sit on the right hand of the power of God” (Luk 22:69); “being by the right hand of God exalted” (Act 2:33); “who is even at the right hand of God” (Rom 8:34); “set him at his own right hand” (Eph 1:20); “Christ sitteth on the right hand of God” (Col 3:1); “sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high” (Heb 1:3); “who is set on the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in the heavens” (Heb 8:1); “sat down on the right hand of God” (Heb 10:12); “is set down at the right hand of the throne of God” (Heb 12:2); “is on the right hand of God” (1Pe 3:22); “am set down with my Father in his throne” (Rev 3:21); “the throne of God and of the Lamb” (Rev 22:3).
  5. The Father is Jesus Christ’s God.
    • Jesus Christ Himself called His Father “My God” twice before He died, once before He ascended to heaven, and four times after He had ascended to heaven: “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” (Mat 27:46; Mar 15:34); “I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God” (Jhn 20:17); “Him that overcometh will I make a pillar in the temple of my God, and he shall go no more out: and I will write upon him the name of my God, and the name of the city of my God, which is new Jerusalem, which cometh down out of heaven from my God” (Rev 3:12).
    • The prophets and apostles wrote that the Father is the God of our Lord Jesus Christ: “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? … O my God, I cry in the daytime … thou art my God from my mother’s belly” (Psa 22:1-2, 10); “I delight to do thy will, O my God” (Psa 40:8); “God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom 15:6); “And ye are Christ’s; and Christ is God’s” (1Co 3:23); “the head of Christ is God” (1Co 11:3); “The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (2Co 11:31); “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Eph 1:3); “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory” (Eph 1:17); “God and the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Col 1:3); “therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows” (Heb 1:9); “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (1Pe 1:3).
  6. The Father and Son aren’t co-equal. The Son derives His power and authority from the Father: “until I make thine enemies thy footstool” (Psa 110:1); “All things are delivered unto me of my Father” (Mat 11:27); “All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth” (Mat 28:18); “Hereafter shall the Son of man sit on the right hand of the power of God” (Luk 22:69); “The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand” (Jhn 3:35); “Jesus knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands” (Jhn 13:3); “for my Father is greater than I” (Jhn 14:28); “Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted” (Act 2:33); “Him hath God exalted” (Act 5:31); “For he hath put all things under his feet. But when he saith all things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put all things under him. And when all things shall be subdued unto him, then shall the Son also himself be subject unto him that put all things under him, that God may be all in all” (1Co 15:27-28); “And hath put all things under his feet, and gave him to be the head over all things to the church” (Eph 1:22); “Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name” (Phl 2:9); “he hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they” (Heb 1:4); “Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet” (Heb 2:8); “angels and authorities and powers being made subject unto him” (1Pe 3:22); “Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing” (Rev 5:12).
  7. The Trinitarian claim that Jesus was eternally begotten is an oxymoron. The normal and reasonable understanding of a father and son relationship is that a son begins existing at the time he is begotten or brought forth. The Son of God hasn’t always existed but had a beginning when He was begotten or brought forth by His Father before the creation of the universe: “When there were no depths, I was brought forth; when there were no fountains abounding with water. Before the mountains were settled, before the hills was I brought forth” (Pro 8:24-25); “And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth” (Jhn 1:14); “No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him” (Jhn 1:18); “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life” (Jhn 3:16); “He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God” (Jhn 3:18); “If God were your Father, ye would love me: for I proceeded forth and came from God; neither came I of myself, but he sent me” (Jhn 8:42); “For the Father himself loveth you, because ye have loved me, and have believed that I came out from God. I came forth from the Father, and am come into the world: again, I leave the world, and go to the Father.” (Jhn 16:27-28); “For I have given unto them the words which thou gavest me; and they have received them, and have known surely that I came out from thee, and they have believed that thou didst send me” (Jhn 17:8); “In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because that God sent his only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through him” (1 John 4:19).
  8. The miraculous works Jesus Christ performed were not by any divine power He retained when He became fully human, but were by God the Father performing the works through Him.
    • Jesus Himself said that He couldn’t do the miraculous works but that His Father was doing them: “But if I cast out devils by the Spirit of God” (Mat 12:28); “But of that day and that hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels which are in heaven, neither the Son, but the Father” (Mar 13:32); “The Son can do nothing of himself, but what he seeth the Father do” (Jhn 5:19); “I can of mine own self do nothing” (Jhn 5:30); “the Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works” (Jhn 14:10).
    • Jesus Christ performed miracles as the Prophet foretold by Moses, “The LORD thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet … I will raise them up a Prophet” (Deu 18:15, 18). God performed the miracles through Him as the Prophet: “This is Jesus the prophet of Nazareth of Galilee” (Mat 21:11); “That a great prophet is risen up among us” (Luk 7:16); “no man can do these miracles that thou doest, except God be with him” (Jhn 3:2); “Then those men, when they had seen the miracle that Jesus did, said, This is of a truth that prophet that should come into the world” (Jhn 6:14); “When Christ cometh, will he do more miracles than these which this man hath done? … Of a truth this is the Prophet” (Jhn 7:31, 40); “Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know” (Act 2:22); “How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost and with power: who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him” (Act 10:38).
  9. The Holy Spirit [Hagios Pneuma] is not a personal being but the Breath of God. The Greek pneuma should have been translated throughout the New Testament as “breath” not “spirit.”
    • The Greek pneuma is simply the noun form of the verb pneo which means “to blow” (Mat 7:25, 27; Luk 12:55; Jhn 3:8, 6:18; Act 27:40; Rev 7:1).
    • The Greek pneuma is where our English word “pneumonia” is derived which a respiratory infection in the air sacs of the lungs that causes difficulty in breathing and can be life-threatening. Another word is “pneumatics” which is the scientific study of compressed air, not of spirit beings!
    • Jesus Himself defined Hagios Pneuma as “breath” by literally breathing on His disciples, “And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost [Hagios Pneuma]” (Jhn 20:22).
    • It’s the Breath of God the Father: “the Spirit [Breath] of God moved upon the face of the waters” (Gen 1:2); “For it is not ye that speak, but the Spirit [Breath] of your Father which speaketh in you” (Mat 10:20); “If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children: how much more shall your heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit [Breath] to them that ask him?” (Luk 11:13); “But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit [Breath] of truth, which proceedeth from the Father” (Jhn 15:26); “But ye are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit, if so be that the Spirit [Breath] of God dwell in you” (Rom 8:9); “Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit [Breath] of God dwelleth in you?” (1Co 3:16).
    • It’s because Jesus Christ has been given full agency and proxy over God’s Breath that the presence of the Holy Breath in our hearts is the equivalency of Jesus Christ: “if so be that the Spirit [Breath] of God dwell in you. Now if any man have not the Spirit [Breath] of Christ, he is none of his. And if Christ be in you” (Rom 8:9-10); “the Spirit [Breath] itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered … It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us” (Rom 8:26, 34); “Now the Lord is that Spirit [Breath]: and where the Spirit [Breath] of the Lord is, there is liberty” (2Co 3:17); “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me” (Gal 2:20); “And because ye are sons, God hath sent forth the Spirit [Breath] of his Son into your hearts, crying, Abba, Father” (Gal 4:6); “to be strengthened with might by his Spirit [Breath] in the inner man; That Christ may dwell in your hearts by faith” (Eph 3:17); “To whom God would make known what is the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles; which is Christ in you, the hope of glory” (Col 1:27).
    • Many years after His ascension and seating at the right hand of God, Jesus gave seven messages to seven churches in Asia. He declared “These things saith the Son of God” (Rev 2:18), and concluded each message with, “He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit [Breath] saith unto the churches” (Rev 2:7, 11, 17, 29, 3:6, 13, 22). He called Himself “the Breath” not just once or twice but seven times!
  10. The doctrine of the Trinity is illogical: the one God consists of three co-equal Persons; Jesus is “God the Son” but also “the Son of God”; Jesus is both a 100% divine being and a 100% human being at the same time; Jesus was eternally begotten; although God can’t be tempted, Jesus is God and was tempted in all points; although God can’t die, Jesus is God and did die.

The Truth is in Jesus

Introduction

The Protestant Reformation was a split from the Roman Catholic Church (RCC) about 500 years ago. However, it wasn’t a complete break because it kept the RCC’s views of God and man—that God is a Trinity of co-equal Persons, and man is an eternal spirit being living inside a physical body that leaves the body at death and goes to live forever either in heaven or hell. Assuming these to be the true views of God and man, the reformers proceeded to develop the systems of theology that have become the foundation of Protestant Christian churches today. They claim that their systematic theology is “the faith which was once delivered unto the saints” (Jde 1:3), when in reality it’s simply a revamp of what was developed and delivered by the RCC.

The apostle Paul likened individual Christians to stones in God’s temple that are built upon its foundation, “And are built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the chief corner stone; In whom all the building fitly framed together groweth unto an holy temple in the Lord” (Eph 2:20-21). The main stone in the foundation is Jesus Christ Himself. And Paul said the same to the Corinthians, “For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ … Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit [breath] of God dwelleth in you?” (1Co 3:11, 16).

The Old Testament written by the prophets and the New Testament written by the apostles is our foundation with “Jesus Christ himself being the chief corner stone.” The Scriptures can only be properly understood by starting with what Jesus Christ Himself taught. He is the foundation, “For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ” (1Co 3:11). But rather than beginning with the foundational doctrines of Jesus Christ and building upon them, the reformers used for a foundation the doctrines of the RCC and built upon them instead. The finished product is the systematic theology of modern Protestant Christian churches.

If we’ll pay close attention to the methodology of modern Protestant preachers we’ll notice they start with assuming their system of theology is true, then impose that system upon how the Scriptures are understood and taught. The result is much confusion and contradictions because they’re trying to harmonize their false system with the truth of the Scriptures. The correct approach, on the other hand, is to start with understanding the truth Jesus taught, then use the truth itself as the rubric for understanding everything else in the Scriptures. This is the only way harmony and agreement across the Scriptures can be achieved.

The devil is a master deceiver. He wants Christians confused and giving up hope of ever finding the truth. Therefore, he wants to keep us bound in the false systems of theology taught today. But we don’t have to remain confused and disheartened about the truth because “the truth is in Jesus” (Eph 4:21).

Religious leaders don’t want the truth

The Jewish people had been devoid of a Messiah or King for hundreds of years but their Scriptures promised that the Messianic line would continue again at some point with the King being a descendant and rightful heir to the throne of David, born in the town of Bethlehem. What they hadn’t understood from their own Scriptures, however, is that this King would be God’s only begotten Son from heaven! That their Messiah is the Son of God was what the religious leaders—priests, scribes, Pharisees, Sadducees—didn’t want to acknowledge and confess because it meant repenting and submitting to Him. Since He is the Son of God, then everything He taught is the truth and final authority, thereby implicating their teaching as false and compelling them to either submit to Him or get rid of Him.

Christ’s Sermon on the Mount was particularly directed at exposing their lies and hypocrisy. What they had been teaching lowered God’s standard of righteousness, “For I say unto you, That except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no case enter into the kingdom of heaven” (Mat 5:20). Repeatedly He stated what they said followed by what He was now saying: “Ye have heard that it was said by them of old time … But I say unto you” (Mat 5:21-22), “Ye have heard that it was said by them of old time … But I say unto you” (Mat 5:27-28), “It hath been said … But I say unto you” (Mat 5:31-32), “Again, ye have heard that it hath been said by them of old time …  But I say unto you” (Mat 5:33-34), “Ye have heard that it hath been said … But I say unto you” (Mat 5:38-39), “Ye have heard that it hath been said … But I say unto you” (Mat 5:43-44).

Saul of Tarsus had been one of those corrupt leaders, trying to rid the world of Jesus’ teachings by destroying His followers. However, his Damascus Road experience brought him face-to-face with the Son of God and with his own hypocrisy. He would later write about the extent of what he forsook to follow Christ, “Circumcised the eighth day, of the stock of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, an Hebrew of the Hebrews; as touching the law, a Pharisee; Concerning zeal, persecuting the church; touching the righteousness which is in the law, blameless. But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ.” (Phl 3:5-7). His list doesn’t necessarily hit home with those of us far removed from his culture and historical setting. But what he had to renounce was essentially everything he had invested his entire life into achieving. Not only did he lose it all but he also exchanged it all for a life of suffering, persecution, and shame. Of course, the sacrifices he had to make is the farthest extreme, yet still serves as a model and example to us, “Howbeit for this cause I obtained mercy, that in me first Jesus Christ might shew forth all longsuffering, for a pattern to them which should hereafter believe on him to life everlasting” (1Ti 1:16).

Only the apostles and a small remnant of the Jewish people were willing to forsake everything to gain Christ while the majority remained steeped in the false teaching of the religious leaders. And this schema has proven to have emerged today with mainstream Christianity bound by the false views of God and man compelled upon them from modern scholars and theologians. They want us listening to them, reading their books, studying their systems of theology, and graduating from their seminaries.

Like the religious leaders 2,000 years ago, the more invested into the system modern theologians have become, the harder it is for them to walk away from it. For fulltime ministers especially, denying the Trinity means not only being unemployed but unemployable. There’s nowhere to go! Therefore, they justify to themselves staying quiet and staying put. This is even more likely for those that believe the doctrine of Once Saved Always Saved. They rationalize that they can’t lose their salvation, therefore it’s not worth losing their job and reputation. Besides, people are supposedly coming to salvation, marriages are being saved, and children are learning. They legitimize accomplishing more by staying than by leaving.

Additionally, the more highly educated and scholarly they become, the harder it is for them to submit to the truth when it comes. As the saying goes, “The bigger they are, the harder they fall.” They have a Doctorate degree in Theology, they’ve written published books and commentaries, they’ve taught in seminaries, they’ve taught thousands of lessons, and they’ve even pastored for decades. They just can’t contemplate having to go tell everyone, “Oops! I was wrong about God. Sorry!”

It’s the quandary of what to do with the monster that was created. If they keep feeding it, it’s just going to get bigger and stronger. On the other hand, if they stop feeding it, it’s going to feed on them. Therefore, out of self-preservation, they keep feeding the monster. We would be quite stunned to learn just how many people in mainstream Christian churches, including even the pastors and elders themselves, have serious doubts and frustrations about the doctrine of the Trinity and many other confusing doctrines. But it’s comfortable and convenient to stay, and difficult to depart. Therefore, they just keep feeding the monster.

The truth is in Jesus

Truth is reality. It’s the actual state of existence. It’s the way things really are. Truth always comports with logic and sound reason. Therefore, illogical and unreasonable teachings implicate themselves as untrue. Truth is consistent and harmonizes the whole. Therefore, inconsistencies, absurdities, and confusion are indicators that what’s being taught isn’t true. Truth is generally simple and easy to understand. Therefore, complex and sophisticated arguments using big words and theological jargon are red flags that what’s being argued isn’t true. Jesus teaching with parables about farming, feasts, and fishing, testifies to the simplicity of truth.

The truth is found in Jesus Christ: “grace and truth came by Jesus Christ” (Jhn 1:17); “And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free” (Jhn 8:32); “And if I say the truth, why do ye not believe me?” (Jhn 8:46); “I am the way, the truth, and the life” (Jhn 14:6); “Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice” (Jhn 18:37); “the truth is in Jesus” (Eph 4:21).

The teaching and preaching of Jesus Christ is the truth. It’s the required starting point and basis for knowing God, ourselves, and everything else in life. None of us are the arbiters of the truth and neither is any system of theology. Jesus Christ has the absolute power and authority to decide all matters of dispute. What He says is the final word.

“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.” (Gen 1:1-3). The very first words of Scripture narrating the creation account were also prophetic about the ministry of Jesus Christ. God showed from the beginning what the spiritual condition of mankind would be 4,000 years later—darkness would be upon the hearts and minds of humanity but the Creator Himself would come into the world and shine light through His teaching, “All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. In him was life; and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.” (Jhn 1:3-5).

But if our gospel be hid, it is hid to them that are lost: In whom the god of this world hath blinded the minds of them which believe not, lest the light of the glorious gospel of Christ, who is the image of God, should shine unto them. For we preach not ourselves, but Christ Jesus the Lord; and ourselves your servants for Jesus’ sake. For God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. (2Corinthians 4:3-6)

Paul taught the Christians at Corinth this same truth. God commanding the light to shine into the darkness in the beginning was prophetic of the gospel Christ preached to the world. And this was also Paul’s message to the Christians at Ephesus.

Having the understanding darkened, being alienated from the life of God through the ignorance that is in them, because of the blindness of their heart: Who being past feeling have given themselves over unto lasciviousness, to work all uncleanness with greediness. But ye have not so learned Christ; If so be that ye have heard him, and have been taught by him, as the truth is in Jesus. (Ephesians 4:18-21)

When we don’t understand something or we’re ignorant of certain knowledge, it’s like being blind and in the dark. The solution is to attain understanding and obtain the correct knowledge so that we’ll no longer be confused and ignorant. Because we’ve all been blinded by the deceptions of the devil through false teaching, coming to the understanding and knowledge of the truth is like having light shine into our darkened hearts and minds, “For God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ” (2Co 4:6), “Having the understanding darkened … through the ignorance that is in them … the blindness of their heart … the truth is in Jesus” (Eph 4:18, 21). Our goal with studying the Scriptures is to no longer be confused and ignorant but to come to the understanding and knowledge of the truth taught by Jesus, then govern our lives by it.

We shouldn’t be surprised by the false systems of theology dominating modern Christianity because it’s precisely what Paul foretold would happen, “And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables [myths]” (2Ti 4:4). The concepts of God as a Trinity of co-equal Persons and man as an eternal spirit that goes to heaven or hell after death are simply myths. But if we love Christ we’ll stand on the side of the truth and live by it, “Everyone on the side of truth listens to me” (Jhn 18:37 NIV). And if we love people, we’ll teach them the truth.

Jesus taught the truth about God

The correct view of God is what Jesus Christ taught about Him, not what any theological system alleges. Nobody but the Son of God has seen God, “No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him” (Jhn 1:18), “Not that any man hath seen the Father, save he which is of God, he hath seen the Father” (Jhn 6:46). Since He is the only one that has seen God, then what He declared about Him is the truth and the final word. Anything contradicting what He taught is false.

Speaking to His Father, Jesus called Him the only true God, “And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent” (Jhn 17:3). He identified and categorized His Father as the only true God while excluding Himself from the only true God.

Jesus called His Father “my God” before He died, after His resurrection, and after having been seated at His right hand, “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” (Mat 27:46; Mar 15:34), “I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God” (Jhn 20:17), “Him that overcometh will I make a pillar in the temple of my God, and he shall go no more out: and I will write upon him the name of my God, and the name of the city of my God, which is new Jerusalem, which cometh down out of heaven from my God: and I will write upon him my new name” (Rev 3:12). According to Jesus Himself, His Father is the one true God and His Father is His God.

Jesus affirmed the Shema written by Moses, “And Jesus answered him, The first of all the commandments is, Hear, O Israel; The Lord [kyrios 2962] our God is one Lord [kyrios 2962]” (Mar 12:29). The Greek kyrios appears about 750 times in the New Testament and is a lord, master, or ruler. Since Jesus taught that “The Ruler” is “one Ruler,” then God is not three co-equal Rulers as Trinitarian theologians teach, but one Ruler.

Jesus taught that God is one Person. The Greek word theos for “God” or “gods” is grammatically singular or plural depending on the number of persons. One person requires theos to be singular while multiple persons requires plural. This is simple grammar. And since Jesus always used theos in the singular when speaking about God, then God must be one Person. This is further bolstered by the fact that when He spoke about men as gods—more than one person as theos—He used the plural, “I said, Ye are gods [theos 2316]? If he called them gods [theos 2316]” (Jhn 10:34-35). He even used this word in both plural and singular form within the same statement, “I said, Ye are gods [theos 2316]? If he called them gods [theos 2316], unto whom the word of God [theos 2316] came” (Jhn 10:34-35). And the apostle Paul also used both forms in the same statement, “For though there be that are called gods [theos 2316], whether in heaven or in earth, (as there be gods [theos 2316] many, and lords many,) But to us there is but one God [theos 2316], the Father” (1Co 8:5-6). Paul even emphasized that the plural is “many” but the singular is “one.” Both Jesus Christ Himself and His apostle understood and taught that theos is either plural or singular based on the number of persons. Therefore, the singular Theos can’t be multiple Persons. But Trinitarian theologians claim just that! They contradict what Jesus Christ taught and even must violate simple rules of grammar to do so.

Jesus taught the truth about Himself

Jesus taught that He is the Son of God: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son” (Jhn 3:16); “Dost thou believe on the Son of God?” (Jhn 9:35); “Say ye of him, whom the Father hath sanctified, and sent into the world, Thou blasphemest; because I said, I am the Son of God?” (Jhn 10:36); “that the Son of God might be glorified thereby” (Jhn 11:4). He never called Himself “God the Son” as Trinitarian theologians do. In fact, the term “God the Son” isn’t found anywhere in Scripture. Jesus Christ called Himself “the Son of God” which is not calling Himself “God” but His Son. God is not His Son but has a Son, and His Son is not God but is His Son. This is simple and easy to understand because truth is simple.

Jesus taught that He was begotten of God and came out from God: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life … He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God” (Jhn 3:16, 18); “If God were your Father, ye would love me: for I proceeded forth and came from God; neither came I of myself, but he sent me” (Jhn 8:42); “For the Father himself loveth you, because ye have loved me, and have believed that I came out from God. I came forth from the Father, and am come into the world: again, I leave the world, and go to the Father.” (Jhn 16:27-28); “For I have given unto them the words which thou gavest me; and they have received them, and have known surely that I came out from thee, and they have believed that thou didst send me” (Jhn 17:8). Trinitarians teach that Jesus has always existed, therefore they deny His begetting to deny His beginning.

Jesus taught that He was with the Father in heaven before coming into the world: “For the bread of God is he which cometh down from heaven” (Jhn 6:33); “For I came down from heaven” (Jhn 6:38); “Before Abraham was, I am” (Jhn 8:58); “I came forth from the Father, and am come into the world: again, I leave the world, and go to the Father” (Jhn 16:28); “And now, O Father, glorify thou me with thine own self with the glory which I had with thee before the world was” (Jhn 17:5); “for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world” (Jhn 17:24).

Jesus taught that His Father is greater than Himself and that His power and authority are derived from Him: “All things are delivered unto me of my Father” (Mat 11:27); “All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth” (Mat 28:18); “Hereafter shall the Son of man sit on the right hand of the power of God” (Luk 22:69), “The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand” (Jhn 3:35); “for my Father is greater than I” (Jhn 14:28), “and am set down with my Father in his throne” (Rev 3:21). Jesus never taught that He is co-equal with the Father as Trinitarian theologians do.

Jesus taught that He couldn’t perform miracles of Himself but that His Father did the works: “The Son can do nothing of himself, but what he seeth the Father do” (Jhn 5:19); “I can of mine own self do nothing” (Jhn 5:30); “the Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works” (Jhn 14:10). Peter that witnessed many of His miracles testified the same, “miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by him” (Act 2:22), “healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him” (Act 10:38).

Jesus taught the truth about God’s breath

Jesus taught that the Greek haagios pneuma is breath by literally breathing on His disciples, “And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy [haagios 40] Ghost [pneuma 4151]” (Jhn 20:22). It’s not a Person but simply breath. Much confusion could have been avoided by simply translating the Hebrew ruwach and Greek pneuma throughout the Scriptures as “breath” instead of “spirit.” The Greek pneuma is where our English word “pneumonia” is derived which a respiratory infection in the air sacs of the lungs that causes difficulty in breathing and can be life-threatening. This is also the root word of “pneumatics” which is the scientific study of compressed air.

In John chapters 14-16, Jesus spoke about Himself as the holy breath in His future role as our Advocate, Intercessor, or Mediator at the right hand of God (Jhn 14:16,26,15:26,16:7). And He qualified His own words as figurative, “These things have I spoken unto you in proverbs” (Jhn 16:25), “Though I have been speaking figuratively” (NIV), “I have spoken these matters in figures of speech” (NLT), “These things I have spoken to you in figurative language” (NKJV). Although Jesus Himself said that He was speaking figuratively, Trinitarian theologians say otherwise and take Him literally instead. Of course, they do take Him figuratively when He called the holy breath “rivers of living water” earlier, “He that believeth [trusts] on me, as the scripture hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water. (But this spake he of the Spirit [breath], which they that believe [trust] on him should receive: for the Holy Ghost [breath] was not yet given; because that Jesus was not yet glorified.)” (Jhn 7:38-39). Apparently, they take His speech however it works in their own best interest.

Although He had been speaking figuratively of the Father’s breath before His death, He told His disciples that the time would come when He would “shew you plainly of the Father.” That time came after His resurrection, “Then said Jesus to them again, Peace be unto you: as my Father hath sent me, even so send I you. And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost [breath]” (Jhn 20:21-22). It was now that He taught His disciples plainly about the Father’s breath by literally breathing on them. Paul and John would both later affirm that Jesus Christ Himself is indeed the Advocate or Interceder of which He had spoken, “the Spirit [breath] itself maketh intercession for usIt is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us” (Rom 8:26,34), “And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous” (1Jo 2:1).

Many years after His ascension and seating at the right hand of God, Jesus gave seven messages to seven churches, concluding each one with “He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit [breath] saith unto the churches” (Rev 2:7,11,17,29,3:6,13,22). He was calling Himself “the breath” not just once or twice but seven times! And Paul said the same, “Now the Lord is that Spirit [breath]” (2Co 3:17). Trinitarian theologians, however, teach that the holy breath is another Person entirely.

Jesus taught the truth about eternal life

Jesus never taught that we go to heaven after death. In fact, there’s nowhere in the entirety of Scripture that teaches we ever go to heaven. It’s simply an RCC doctrine. Since Jesus didn’t teach this, then it’s not true. What Jesus did teach is bodily resurrection from the grave to live forever: “Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life … Marvel not at this: for the hour is coming, in the which all that are in the graves shall hear his voice, And shall come forth; they that have done good, unto the resurrection of life; and they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of damnation” (Jhn 5:24, 28-29); “raise it up again at the last day … I will raise him up at the last day … I will raise him up at the last day … Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that believeth on me hath everlasting life … Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day” (Jhn 6:39, 40, 44, 47, 54); “Martha saith unto him, I know that he shall rise again in the resurrection at the last day. Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live” (John 11:24-25).

Jesus taught the truth about death

The Scriptures speak of life as seeing light and death as darkness: “To bring back his soul from the pit, to be enlightened with the light of the living” (Job 33:30); “He shall go to the generation of his fathers; they shall never see light” (Psa 49:19), “that I may walk before God in the light of the living?” (Psa 56:13); “In him was life; and the life was the light of men” (Jhn 1:4); “to whom the mist of darkness is reserved for ever” (2Pe 2:17), “to whom is reserved the blackness of darkness for ever” (Jde 1:13).

Jesus taught light or darkness in conjunction with the body: “The light of the body is the eye: if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light. But if thine eye be evil, thy whole body shall be full of darkness. If therefore the light that is in thee be darkness, how great is that darkness!” (Mat 6:22-23); “The light of the body is the eye: therefore when thine eye is single, thy whole body also is full of light; but when thine eye is evil, thy body also is full of darkness. Take heed therefore that the light which is in thee be not darkness.” (Luk 11:34-35). He taught that if we’ll commit the light we see now with singleness of heart and loyalty to Him, then our whole body will be full of light forever. But if we’re using this life and the light we see for evil, then our whole body will be full of darkness. Therefore, we should take heed to not squander the precious light we have and end up in darkness.

He taught that humans are physical beings either alive seeing light or dead in darkness bodily. He never spoke of man as a spirit being that can live disembodied after death. Rather, life and death are in conjunction with the body.

Jesus spoke of death as darkness: “But the children of the kingdom shall be cast out into outer darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth” (Mat 8:12), “Bind him hand and foot, and take him away, and cast him into outer darkness; there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth” (Mat 22:13), “And cast ye the unprofitable servant into outer darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth” (Mat 25:30). It’s called “outer darkness” because the dead are cast outside the renewed Jerusalem, banned from the tree of life, “Blessed are they that do his commandments, that they may have right to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gates into the city. For without [outside] are dogs, and sorcerers, and whoremongers, and murderers, and idolaters, and whosoever loveth and maketh a lie.” (Rev 22:14-15).

The Greek geenna is the word translated as “hell” in the New Testament. Jesus spoke about this place in six different passages (Mat 5:22-30,10:28,18:9,23:15-33; Mar 9:43-48; Luk 12:5). He taught that it’s a material place where people are thrown bodily:

But I say unto you, That whosoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment: and whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be in danger of the council: but whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hell [geenna 1067] fire. … And if thy right eye offend thee, pluck it out, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell [geenna 1067]. And if thy right hand offend thee, cut it off, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell [geenna 1067]. (Matthew 5:22,29-30)

And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell [geenna 1067]. (Matthew 10:28)

And if thine eye offend thee, pluck it out, and cast it from thee: it is better for thee to enter into life with one eye, rather than having two eyes to be cast into hell [geenna 1067] fire. (Matthew 18:9)

And if thy hand offend thee, cut it off: it is better for thee to enter into life maimed, than having two hands to go into hell [geenna 1067], into the fire that never shall be quenched: Where their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched. And if thy foot offend thee, cut it off: it is better for thee to enter halt into life, than having two feet to be cast into hell [geenna 1067], into the fire that never shall be quenched: Where their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched. And if thine eye offend thee, pluck it out: it is better for thee to enter into the kingdom of God with one eye, than having two eyes to be cast into hell [geenna 1067] fire: Where their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched. (Mark 9:43-48)

This place geenna where people are thrown bodily is the lake of fire where the resurrected dead are cast: “And the sea gave up the dead which were in it; and death and hell [the grave] delivered up the dead which were in them: and they were judged every man according to their works. And death and hell [the grave] were cast into the lake of fire. This is the second death. And whosoever was not found written in the book of life was cast into the lake of fire.” (Rev 20:13-15)

Jesus also contrasted eternal life with annihilation: “That whosoever believeth in him should not perish [apollymi 622], but have eternal life. For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish [apollymi 622], but have everlasting life.” (Jhn 3:15-16); “And I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish [apollymi 622], neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand” (Jhn 10:28); “He that loveth his life shall lose [apollymi 622] it; and he that hateth his life in this world shall keep it unto life eternal” (Jhn 12:25). According to Jesus, the two destinies of man are either eternal life or annihilation. And He taught that the majority will be annihilated while relatively few will have eternal life, “Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction [apōleia 684], and many there be which go in thereat: Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it” (Mat 7:13-14).

Jesus taught the truth about salvation

Jesus taught that to enter His kingdom, we must live to the standard of righteousness He commanded, “For I say unto you, That except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no case enter into the kingdom of heaven” (Mat 5:20). His standard is His teaching in this very sermon. We must hear Him and do what He says, “Therefore whosoever heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them … And every one that heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them not” (Mat 7:24,26).

Jesus taught faithfulness to Him as Lord: “No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon.” (Mat 6:24); “The disciple is not above his master, nor the servant above his lord. It is enough for the disciple that he be as his master, and the servant as his lord.” (Mat 10:24-25); “Then the lord of that servant was moved with compassion, and loosed him, and forgave him the debt” (Mat 18:27); “Who then is a faithful and wise servant, whom his lord hath made ruler over his household, to give them meat in due season?” (Mat 24:45); “His lord said unto him, Well done, thou good and faithful servant: thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things: enter thou into the joy of thy lord … His lord said unto him, Well done, good and faithful servant; thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things: enter thou into the joy of thy lord” (Mat 25:21,23); “And the Lord said, Who then is that faithful and wise steward, whom his lord shall make ruler over his household, to give them their portion of meat in due season? Blessed is that servant, whom his lord when he cometh shall find so doing.” (Luk 12:42-43); “He that is faithful in that which is least is faithful also in much: and he that is unjust in the least is unjust also in much. If therefore ye have not been faithful in the unrighteous mammon, who will commit to your trust the true riches? And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another man’s, who shall give you that which is your own?” (Luk 16:10-12); “Doth he thank that servant because he did the things that were commanded him? I trow not.” (Luk 17:9); “Well, thou good servant: because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities” (Luk 19:17); “If any man serve me, let him follow me; and where I am, there shall also my servant be: if any man serve me, him will my Father honour” (Jhn 12:26); “Verily, verily, I say unto you, The servant is not greater than his lord; neither he that is sent greater than he that sent him” (Jhn 13:16); “Remember the word that I said unto you, The servant is not greater than his lord. If they have persecuted me, they will also persecute you; if they have kept my saying, they will keep yours also” (Jhn 15:20).

Jesus taught that we must deny ourselves and lose our life for His sake, “If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. For whosoever will save his life shall lose it: and whosoever will lose his life for my sake shall find it.” (Mat 16:24-25), “And he said to them all, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me. For whosoever will save his life shall lose it: but whosoever will lose his life for my sake, the same shall save it.” (Luk 9:23-24).

Conclusion

Jesus taught that we can’t be ashamed of Him or ashamed of His words, “For whosoever shall be ashamed of me and of my words, of him shall the Son of man be ashamed, when he shall come in his own glory, and in his Father’s, and of the holy angels” (Luk 9:26). What will we do with the doctrine of the Trinity? If Jesus Christ is truly our Lord and we’ve come to the knowledge of what He taught about God and man, how can we continue to embrace modern systematic theology founded upon RCC doctrine? How can we be ashamed of His words and still be serving Him?

It’s one thing to embrace something false that we sincerely believe is true, but quite another to learn the truth Jesus taught yet continue to embrace what is false. How can Jesus Christ be our Lord when we’re refusing to humble ourselves and submit to His teaching? We can be sincerely deceived and God will forgive us when we repent. However, we’re in grave danger when we’ve come to know the truth Jesus taught but willingly fight against it.

Jesus taught that the religious leaders of His day worshipped God in vain by teaching their own doctrines as commandments, “But in vain they do worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men” (Mat 15:9), “Howbeit in vain do they worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men” (Mar 7:7). Trinitarian theologians teach that the doctrine of the Trinity is essential for salvation and that it’s a closed case, not open for discussion. They’re commanding unquestioned loyalty to their doctrine to be saved. But why don’t they want to discuss it? Why don’t they want it questioned? Why do they hush and censor those that disagree with it? Could it be that they don’t want it exposed as false? Truth doesn’t demand silence—truth silences, “And no man was able to answer him a word, neither durst any man from that day forth ask him any more questions” (Mat 22:46).

True Theology – Part 2

Introduction

The doctrine of the Trinity is illogical and simply doesn’t make sense. Even many of the most highly intelligent Trinitarian theologians admit, albeit reluctantly, that they just can’t understand this doctrine. But the reason they can’t understand it is because even God can’t understand it! But seriously, since truth is logical but the doctrine of the Trinity is illogical, it’s not true. Just a few of its main illogical claims: the one God consists of three Persons; Jesus is both “God the Son” and “the Son of God”; Jesus is both a 100% divine being and a 100% human being at the same time; Jesus was eternally begotten; although God can’t be tempted, Jesus is God and was tempted in all points; although God can’t die, Jesus is God and did die.

The correct view of God, on the other hand, is quite simple and logical. One Person is God and has always existed. At some point before the creation, God begat His Son equal to Himself in substance and kind but under His direct submission and authority. Therefore, the one true God became the Father by having begotten His Son. He then directed His Son to create the heavens, the earth, and all living creatures including all principalities and powers. After man sinned, God began His plan of salvation to reconcile the world to Himself through His Son. The Son of God willingly relinquished His divinity and was made flesh—He transitioned from a 100% divine being to a 100% human being. As a human being, He worked miracles, signs, and wonders by the anointing of His Father’s Breath upon Him. He lived a perfect and sinless life then died on the cross for the sins of the world, committing Himself to His Father to raise Him from the dead. After His resurrection, He ascended back to heaven and sat down at the right hand of His Father having been given all power in heaven and earth, ever living to make intercession for the saints. And He will return one day to raise all of His own to eternal life in His Kingdom.

Although the doctrine of the Trinity is the landslide majority view of Christians today, history has been consistent in the majority view being wrong while only a small remnant is following the one true God. In Paul’s last words to the world he said, “This thou knowest, that all they which are in Asia be turned away from me” (2Ti 1:15). It’s quite unfathomable that everyone in Asia had turned away from the apostle Paul himself. Surely the majority couldn’t have been wrong! If this was true of the majority even in the days of the apostles themselves then how much more it could very well be true today almost 2,000 years later.

We don’t realize just how utterly pervasive and thorough the devil has corrupted the truth over the last 2,000 years. There are thousands of Protestant Christian denominations worldwide and within many of these denominations abound factions, divisions, and disagreements about the truth. New denominations are formed usually by splits within the existing ones.

Jesus Christ taught the truth, “I am the way, the truth, and the life” (Jhn 14:6), “Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice” (Jhn 18:37), and His teaching is quite simple and easy to understand. But Trinitarian theologians peddle a complex and illogical mess that confuses people, leaving them frustrated and sometimes even giving up on ever knowing the truth. Modern theologians are the main perpetrators of the false doctrine of the Trinity. They’ve been taught by the previous generation and continue the cycle by teaching and training the next generation of theologians and pastors in seminaries. And once they’ve immersed them into the system, they train them in apologetics to skillfully defend any attacks against the system. But instead of submitting to Jesus Christ and agreeing with the simple truth that He taught, Trinitarian theologians continue to push their complex and illogical system. Therefore, in this writing, I don’t refer to Trinitarians in general but Trinitarian theologians specifically. A wise man once said, “Lucy… You’ve got some splainin’ to do!”

What is our authority?

Paul taught that Jesus Christ is the Head, the highest authority over the church, “And hath put all things under his feet, and gave him to be the head over all things to the church, Which is his body, the fulness of him that filleth all in all” (Eph 1:22-23), “For the husband is the head of the wife, even as Christ is the head of the church: and he is the saviour of the body” (Eph 5:23), “And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence” (Col 1:18).

The church is under the authority of the Head and should submit to the truth He taught: “grace and truth came by Jesus Christ” (Jhn 1:17); “And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free” (Jhn 8:32); “And if I say the truth, why do ye not believe me?” (Jhn 8:46); “I am the way, the truth, and the life” (Jhn 14:6); “Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice” (Jhn 18:37); “the truth is in Jesus” (Eph 4:21). What Jesus taught about God and about Himself is the truth and the final authority that settles all disputes.

Trinitarian theologians, on the other hand, appeal to church councils and creeds as their authority for the doctrine of the Trinity. They claim that the “truth” of the Trinity was established by the church hundreds, and some even say 2,000 years ago. They also invoke the majority mainstream view of Protestant Christian churches today for support. But these tactics just appeal to the church as their authority rather than to its Head. Why not submit to the truth taught by our Lord Jesus Christ? If we know the truth He taught yet won’t submit to it, is He really our Lord? Is He really the Head, or is the church?

Jesus declared the Father

No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him” (Jhn 1:18), “And the Father himself, which hath sent me, hath borne witness of me. Ye have neither heard his voice at any time, nor seen his shape.” (Jhn 5:37), “Not that any man hath seen the Father, save he which is of God, he hath seen the Father” (Jhn 6:46), “Who only hath immortality, dwelling in the light which no man can approach unto; whom no man hath seen, nor can see” (1Ti 6:16), “No man hath seen God at any time. If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfected in us.” (1Jo 4:12).

None of us has seen God. Therefore, when it comes to the knowledge of God, none of us knows what we’re talking about! Only the Son of God has seen God the Father because He was with God before coming into this world, “and the Word was with God” (Jhn 1:1), “the Word of life … which was with the Father” (1Jo 1:1, 2). Since He’s the only one that was with God and has seen God then He is the only one that knows what He’s talking about. We must listen to what He said about God and what He said about Himself. Trinitarian theologians, although having never seen God, teach something different than what the Son of God taught yet want us to listen to them!

“All things are delivered unto me of my Father: and no man knoweth the Son, but the Father; neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son will reveal him” (Mat 11:27); “Then said they unto him, Where is thy Father? Jesus answered, Ye neither know me, nor my Father: if ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also.” (Jhn 8:19); “Yet ye have not known him; but I know him: and if I should say, I know him not, I shall be a liar like unto you: but I know him, and keep his saying” (Jhn 8:55); “As the Father knoweth me, even so know I the Father: and I lay down my life for the sheep” (Jhn 10:15); “O righteous Father, the world hath not known thee: but I have known thee, and these have known that thou hast sent me” (Jhn 17:25).

No man knows the Son, and no man knows the Father—only the Father knows the Son, and only the Son knows the Father. What they said about each other is the final word. And there is nothing here about a third Person knowing either of them or being known by either of them. The pressure isn’t on those of us that agree with what the Father and Son said about each other. The pressure is on Trinitarian theologians that disagree with them and teach something else.

What the Father and Son declared about each other is very clear and understandable. The Son called Himself “the Son of God” and the Father called Him “My Beloved Son.” The Son never called Himself “God” and the Father never called His Son “God.” Furthermore, the Son did call His Father “God” and even called Him “My God.” Finally, neither of them called the Holy Breath “God.” Both God the Father and the Son of God agree with each other completely. Why do Trinitarian theologians teach something different about them? Why won’t they agree with them? Do they know more about the Father and the Son than even the Father and the Son know about their own selves?

The proper knowledge of God begins with the words of the Son of God. His words about God and about Himself are the lens through which we are to understand and view everything else about God in the Scriptures. He said, “For whosoever shall be ashamed of me and of my words, of him shall the Son of man be ashamed, when he shall come in his own glory, and in his Father’s, and of the holy angels” (Luk 9:26). To know and understand His words about God and about Himself yet teach something different is to be ashamed of Him and of His words. And He said that if we’re ashamed of Him and of His words, He will be ashamed of us—He will deny us before the Father and we will perish. Do any really suppose we can knowingly and willingly disagree with Jesus Christ and still be saved by Him?

The lens of Trinitarian theologians

Rather than starting with what Jesus Christ taught about God and about Himself, Trinitarian theologians start with their own theological system and use it as the lens by which they view what the Scriptures say about God. That they begin by assuming the doctrine of the Trinity is true then impose it upon the Scriptures is most glaringly obvious by them forcing the simple meaning of the plural from “more than one” to exactly three! The statements, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness” (Gen 1:26), “Go to, let us go down, and there confound their language” (Gen 11:7), “Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?” (Isa 6:8), supposedly prove a Triune God. Instead of following evidence to where it leads, they’re leading it to where they want it to go. But staying faithful to Jesus’ teaching, “And no man hath ascended up to heaven, but he that came down from heaven, even the Son of man which is in heaven” (Jhn 3:13), “And now, O Father, glorify thou me with thine own self with the glory which I had with thee before the world was” (Jhn 17:5), we conclude that the plurality of divine beings in the Scriptures are two—the Father and the Son.

By using the doctrine of the Trinity as their lens, the places Paul wrote of “God our Saviour” (1Ti 1:1, 2:3; Tit 1:3, 2:10, 3:4) supposedly indicate that since Jesus is our Savior then Jesus is God. However, if we’ll begin with Jesus Christ’s own words and stay true to what He taught about God then we’ll understand that God the Father is our Savior because He sent His Son to save us, “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.” (Jhn 3:16-17). The Father and the Son can both be spoken of as our Savior because they both are. In fact, Paul even distinguished God our Savior from our Lord Jesus Christ, “Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ by the commandment of God our Saviour, and Lord Jesus Christ, which is our hope” (1Ti 1:1).

Another example is the claim that the Holy Breath must be a Person co-equal with God because Peter said that lying to the Holy Breath is lying to God, “But Peter said, Ananias, why hath Satan filled thine heart to lie to the Holy Ghost [Breath] … thou hast not lied unto men, but unto God” (Act 5:3-4). But this is simply grasping at straws to make the Scriptures affirm Trinitarian doctrine. By reminding ourselves what Jesus taught about the Holy Breath, “If a man love me, he will keep my words: and my Father will love him, and we will come unto him, and make our abode with him” (Jhn 14:23), we understand that God the Father and His Son Jesus Christ are present in the hearts of men by the indwelling Breath. Therefore, lying to these men indwelt by the Breath was tantamount to lying to God.

The last example is when Paul said “God was manifest [phaneroo 5319] in the flesh” (1Ti 3:16), this supposedly proves that Jesus is God in the flesh. However, he was simply saying that God the Father was being made known, recognized, understood, or actualized through the incarnation of His Son Jesus Christ. This agrees with what His Son said, “And he that seeth me seeth him that sent me” (Jhn 12:45), “he that hath seen me hath seen the Father” (Jhn 14:9), and with what John said, “the Word of life; (For the life was manifested [phaneroo 5319] … eternal life, which was with the Father, and was manifested [phaneroo 5319] unto us” (1Jo 1:2). Jesus Christ in the flesh manifested God to us.

What God said about Jesus Christ

Twice God the Father spoke from heaven calling Jesus His beloved Son—first at His baptism and second at the Mount of Transfiguration, “And lo a voice from heaven, saying, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased” (Mat 3:17), “While he yet spake, behold, a bright cloud overshadowed them: and behold a voice out of the cloud, which said, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye him.” (Mat 17:5).

The apostle John, present at both occasions and also at Christ’s crucifixion when He shed His blood, wrote about these events, “Who is he that overcometh the world, but he that believeth that Jesus is the Son of God? This is he that came by water and blood, even Jesus Christ; not by water only, but by water and blood” (1Jo 5:5-6). He went on to say, “If we receive the witness of men, the witness of God is greater: for this is the witness of God which he hath testified of his Son” (1Jo 5:9). Since we accept the witness of two or three men as the truth then how much greater is the witness of God Himself? Especially since God testified twice from heaven about His Son? Saying something different about the Son than what God testified is to make God a liar, “He that believeth on the Son of God hath the witness in himself: he that believeth not God hath made him a liar; because he believeth not the record that God gave of his Son” (1Jo 5:10). For Trinitarian theologians to say that Jesus is “God the Son” is tantamount to making God a liar because He didn’t call Him “God” but His Son.

What Jesus Christ said about Himself

Jesus never called Himself “God the Son” but “the Son of God”: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son” (Jhn 3:16); “Dost thou believe on the Son of God? … Thou hast both seen him, and it is he that talketh with thee” (Jhn 9:35, 37); “Say ye of him, whom the Father hath sanctified, and sent into the world, Thou blasphemest; because I said, I am the Son of God?” (Jhn 10:36); “that the Son of God might be glorified thereby” (Jhn 11:4); “Father, the hour is come; glorify thy Son, that thy Son also may glorify thee” (Jhn 17:1).

Even many years after His death, burial, resurrection, and ascension back to heaven and seating at the right hand of God, this is what He continued to call Himself, “These things saith the Son of God” (Rev 2:18). Trinitarian theologians, however, call Him “God the Son.” How do they know something different about Him that even He didn’t know about Himself?

What John said about Jesus Christ

The apostle John stated the reasons he wrote his Gospel and his first letter, “But these are written, that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through his name” (Jhn 20:31), “These things have I written unto you that believe on the name of the Son of God; that ye may know that ye have eternal life, and that ye may believe on the name of the Son of God” (1Jo 5:13). He wrote, not so that we would believe Jesus is “God the Son,” but that He is “the Son of God.”

He taught throughout his first letter that Jesus Christ is the Son: “and truly our fellowship is with the Father, and with his Son Jesus Christ” (1Jo 1:3); “and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin” (1Jo 1:7); “He is antichrist, that denieth the Father and the Son. Whosoever denieth the Son, the same hath not the Father … ye also shall continue in the Son, and in the Father.” (1Jo 2:22-24); “For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil” (1Jo 3:8); “That we should believe on the name of his Son Jesus Christ” (1Jo 3:23); “because that God sent his only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through him. Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins” (1Jo 4:9-10); “And we have seen and do testify that the Father sent the Son to be the Saviour of the world. Whosoever shall confess that Jesus is the Son of God, God dwelleth in him, and he in God” (1Jo 4:14-15); “Who is he that overcometh the world, but he that believeth that Jesus is the Son of God?” (1Jo 5:5); “And we know that the Son of God is come, and hath given us an understanding, that we may know him that is true, and we are in him that is true, even in his Son Jesus Christ” (1Jo 5:20).

If we receive the witness of men, the witness of God is greater: for this is the witness of God which he hath testified of his Son. He that believeth on the Son of God hath the witness in himself: he that believeth not God hath made him a liar; because he believeth not the record that God gave of his Son. And this is the record, that God hath given to us eternal life, and this life is in his Son. He that hath the Son hath life; and he that hath not the Son of God hath not life. These things have I written unto you that believe on the name of the Son of God; that ye may know that ye have eternal life, and that ye may believe on the name of the Son of God. (1 John 5:9-13)

In these five consecutive verses alone, John mentioned the Son eight times! It seems he wanted to emphasize repeatedly to make it absolutely clear that He is the Son of God. And his second letter began with, “Grace be with you, mercy, and peace, from God the Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of the Father, in truth and love” (2Jo 1:3).

No other man in history knew Jesus Christ better than the apostle John. He lived with Him for over three years and was personally taught by Him. He heard with his own ears what God declared about Him at His baptism and also at the Mount of Transfiguration. He ate with Him at His last supper, watched Him hang on the cross, took His mother into his own home, was an eyewitness of Him after His resurrection, and saw Him ascend back into heaven. He wrote five books of the Bible including one of the four Gospels and the very last book of the entire canon of Scripture. And John was the last man on this earth to ever see Him when He was given the final revelation of Jesus Christ.

The apostle John knew Him better than anyone ever has, and he never called Jesus “God the Son” but always “the Son of God,” “the only begotten Son,” and “the Son.” How can anyone suppose they know better about Jesus Christ than he did? Why should we listen to Trinitarian theologians rather than to John?

Confessing the Son of God

The apostle Peter’s great confession was “Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Mat 16:16). And the apostle John also wrote, “But these are written, that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God” (Jhn 20:31). This is also what the apostle Paul and his companions preached, “And straightway he preached Christ in the synagogues, that he is the Son of God” (Act 9:20), “For the Son of God, Jesus Christ, who was preached among you by us, even by me and Silvanus and Timotheus, was not yea and nay, but in him was yea” (2Co 1:19). Trinitarian theologians, however, teach and preach that He is “God the Son”—a term found nowhere in Scripture.

The confession of salvation is that Jesus is the Son of God, “Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Mat 16:16), “Whosoever shall confess that Jesus is the Son of God, God dwelleth in him, and he in God” (1Jo 4:15). But the Trinitarian confession that He is “God the Son” actually denies He is “the Son of God” because He can’t be both. If He is God then He can’t be God’s Son, but if He is God’s Son then He can’t be God because they are two distinct Persons. There’s no way around this.

Although Trinitarian theologians teach both—that He is “God the Son” and “the Son of God”—they can’t mean both because He can’t be both. They can only mean one or the other because He can only be one or the other. It’s how they define Him that actually counts. Though they might say He is “the Son of God,” but because they define Him as “God the Son” they’re actually denying that He is “the Son of God”—the very confession of salvation! It isn’t just what we say but what we mean by what we say. It’s both the mouth and the heart.

More is not always better

The typical false views of Jesus deflate Him and make Him something less—that He is only a man or that He is an angelic being. But the doctrine of the Trinity is even more subtle and sinister altogether because it actually inflates Him and makes Him something more—that He is “God the Son,” co-equal with God the Father. Therefore, according to Trinitarian theologians, denying this view of Jesus is denying God. This is why it’s incredibly difficult for Christians to ever repent of this false doctrine even after they’re aware of the overwhelming evidence of Scripture against it. It’s even made more difficult by the fact that it also entails going against the landslide majority view of Christianity and thereby being labeled a heretic. Furthermore, there’s always the looming fear of being wrong about this and therefore forever doomed to eternal fire. It’s a horrible deception and bondage indeed.

As noble as it might seem, making Jesus to be “God the Son” doesn’t glorify Him or the Father. Making someone or something else to be God—either the Son of God or the Holy Breath of God—actually impinges upon the glory of the one true God the Father, “I am the LORD: that is my name: and my glory will I not give to another, neither my praise to graven images” (Isa 42:8). More Persons doesn’t improve upon God! As if too much oil in a car is better than the right amount. What if, hypothetically, some Christians were to claim that God is four Persons? Would that be better? Trinitarians would then be the ones anathematized for denying one of the Persons.

Making the Son of God to be co-equal with God the Father actually violates the First Commandment, “Thou shalt have no other gods before me” (Exo 20:3). This commandment is not broken by obedience to gods, rulers, or lords under the authority of the one true God, “Thou shalt not revile the gods, nor curse the ruler of thy people” (Exo 22:28). Obedience to Jesus Christ as our Lord glorifies God because Jesus Himself is under the authority of God the Father, “my Father is greater than I” (Jhn 14:28), “Christ is God’s” (1Co 3:23), “the head of Christ is God” (1Co 11:3). Maintaining this hierarchy of authority is essential for a correct view of God while making anyone or anything co-equal with God breaks the First Commandment.

It’s because of this hierarchy of authority that Jesus said, “I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God” (Jhn 20:17), then Thomas subsequently called Jesus, “My Lord and my God” (Jhn 20:28). We call both the Son of God “my God” and also the Father “my God” because the Son rules over us and the Father rules over the Son. The Son is our God because He is our Lord, and the Father is our God because He is our Lord’s God. Similarly, it’s because of the hierarchy in the workplace that both our boss and our boss’s boss are our bosses. Both are our bosses not because they’re equal but because they’re not equal!

Hierarchy is the reason that in the following statement the Son is God over His own Kingdom, while God that anointed Him is His own God, “But unto the Son he saith, Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: a sceptre of righteousness is the sceptre of thy kingdom. Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity; therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows.” (Heb 1:8-9).

God the Father is glorified when His Son Jesus Christ is given the proper glory, “Father, the hour is come; glorify thy Son, that thy Son also may glorify thee … that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent” (Jhn 17:1, 3). Paul said that God the Father is glorified, not by confessing Christ is “God the Son,” but Lord, “And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Phl 2:11). Christ’s Lordship is the confession of salvation, “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved” (Rom 10:9). Paul also declared that his one God is the Father and his one Lord is Jesus Christ, “But to us there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him” (1Co 8:6), “One Lord, one faith, one baptism, One God and Father of all” (Eph 4:5-6).

Another argument Trinitarian theologians make is that Jesus must be “God the Son” because He is worshipped as God. However, we’re told that He is worshipped because He is the Son of God and because He is Lord, “Then they that were in the ship came and worshipped him, saying, Of a truth thou art the Son of God” (Mat 14:33), “Then came she and worshipped him, saying, Lord, help me” (Mat 15:25), “And as they went to tell his disciples, behold, Jesus met them, saying, All hail. And they came and held him by the feet, and worshipped him … And when they saw him, they worshipped him: but some doubted” (Mat 28:9, 17), “And they worshipped him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy” (Luk 24:52).

Claiming that Jesus is more—that He is more than the only begotten Son of God but has always existed from eternity past, and that He is more than a human kind of being but continues to be a divine kind of being, and that He is more than “the Son of God” but is “God the Son,” and that He is more than Lord but is also co-equal with God—might seem virtuous but is dangerous. An embellished view of Jesus Christ is still a false view of Jesus Christ. Making Him more is not better.

Opposite sides of the ditch

Trinitarians and Unitarians both have a false view of Jesus Christ from the same root cause—a misunderstanding of the meaning of the word “God” translated from the Greek theos. Since they both understand theos as a type of being, then the Son begotten of God must also be God or else wasn’t begotten the same type of being. Trinitarian theologians fall into the ditch that He is God and therefore are forced to claim that He has always existed, that His incarnation was a hypostatic union of two types of beings, that His miracles were by His own power, and that He even resurrected His own self! Unitarian theologians, however, fall into the ditch on the other side of the road. Since they correctly understand that only the Father is God, then the Son of God can’t be the same type of being as His Father because this would mean that the Son is also God as Trinitarians teach. Therefore, they’re forced to claim that Jesus is only a man that didn’t pre-exist His humanity but was begotten by God in the womb of Mary.

Correctly understanding that theos isn’t a type of being but a position of authority solves the entire problem, harmonizes all of Scripture, and glorifies the Father and the Son. There is only one God the Father in the position of the highest supreme authority. The Son of God Jesus Christ was begotten of God as the same type of being before the creation of the universe yet is not God Himself because only His Father occupies that highest position. In His incarnation, Jesus transitioned from the same type of divine being as His Father into a human being in the womb of His mother Mary, “And the Word was made flesh” (Jhn 1:14). He is now a different kind of being than before but still the Son of God because He was born of a virgin. Trinitarian theologians make Him more than He is (co-equal with God), while Unitarian theologians make Him less than He is (just a man).

Why did Jesus speak figuratively?

The main argument Trinitarian theologians make for the Holy Breath being a Person are the occurrences in John chapters 14, 15, and 16 where Jesus spoke of the Breath using personal pronouns: “Even the Spirit [Breath] of truth; whom the world cannot receive, because it seeth him not, neither knoweth him: but ye know him; for he dwelleth with you, and shall be in you” (Jhn 14:17), “the Spirit [Breath] of truth, which proceedeth from the Father, he shall testify of me” (Jhn 15:26), “Howbeit when he, the Spirit [Breath] of truth, is come, he will guide you into all truth: for he shall not speak of himself; but whatsoever he shall hear, that shall he speak: and he will shew you things to come” (Jhn 16:13).

However, Jesus Himself finished His discourse by stating that He had been speaking figuratively, “These things have I spoken unto you in proverbs [figuratively]: but the time cometh, when I shall no more speak unto you in proverbs [figuratively], but I shall shew you plainly of the Father” (Jhn 16:25). The apostle Paul later confirmed this to be his understanding of what Christ taught because he used neuter pronouns for the Breath (however some Bible versions incorrectly translate his statements with personal pronouns), “The Spirit [Breath] itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God” (Rom 8:16), “Likewise the Spirit [Breath] also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit [Breath] itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered” (Rom 8:26).

This is also how the apostle John later understood Christ because He called the Breath “the anointing” and used a neuter pronoun as well, “But the anointing which ye have received of him abideth in you, and ye need not that any man teach you: but as the same anointing teacheth you of all things, and is truth, and is no lie, and even as it hath taught you, ye shall abide in him” (1Jo 2:27). The anointing teaches us just as Christ had said, “But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost [Breath], whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things” (Jhn 14:26).

Although before His death Jesus spoke to His disciples about the Breath figuratively as if it’s a Person yet after His resurrection, He showed them plainly that it is Breath, “he breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost [Breath]” (Jhn 20:21-22). The obvious question is why He didn’t just tell them plainly at the start? Why lead them to understand one thing initially then clarify the correct understanding later?

The first thing we should recognize is that throughout His ministry, Jesus had only told them what they needed to hear up to any given point, “And these things I said not unto you at the beginning, because I was with you” (Jhn 16:4). Too much information too soon is not always a good thing. They didn’t need to hear this discourse about the Holy Breath three years earlier because Jesus Himself was with them all the time. It was because it was now time for Him to go away that they needed to hear it now.

And even now at this point, there were many more things He wouldn’t tell them because they couldn’t handle them yet, “I have yet many things to say unto you, but ye cannot bear them now” (Jhn 16:12). He would later teach these things to them through the Breath, “But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost [Breath], whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things” (Jhn 14:26), “Howbeit when he, the Spirit [Breath] of truth, is come, he will guide you into all truth: for he shall not speak of himself; but whatsoever he shall hear, that shall he speak: and he will shew you things to come” (Jhn 16:13).

Putting ourselves in the disciples’ shoes so to speak, they had left everything to follow Jesus Christ and now after only about three years He was breaking the news to them that He was leaving! Understandably they would be troubled, afraid, and full of sorrow, “Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid” (Jhn 14:27), “But because I have said these things unto you, sorrow hath filled your heart” (Jhn 16:6).

It certainly would have seemed they were now being abandoned and left without hope had He not spoken of someone else—another Person—coming to take His place. On the other hand, at this point He still couldn’t just tell them plainly either. He couldn’t explain that He was going to die, rise the third day, appear to them many times, ascend back to heaven, give them the Holy Breath on the Day of Pentecost, and then they would go out and preach the gospel to the world. They couldn’t handle all of that yet. It was because God’s plan of salvation had to be kept hidden in a mystery beforehand that Jesus communicated to them figuratively about the Holy Breath as if another Person. They would understand later that it’s actually Himself, His own Person indwelling them through the Breath.

Yet He needed to tell them enough “that my joy might remain in you” (Jhn 15:11), “that ye should not be offended” (Jhn 16:1), “that in me ye might have peace” (Jhn 16:33). Also, He wanted to give them evidence for their trust in Him, “And now I have told you before it come to pass, that, when it is come to pass, ye might believe” (Jhn 14:29), “But these things have I told you, that when the time shall come, ye may remember that I told you of them” (Jhn 16:4). As the saying goes “Hindsight is always 20/20.” They wouldn’t see clearly now but would later. By telling them beforehand, they would know that He had not been a victim but had in fact laid down His own life as “the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world” (Jhn 1:29).

The Holy Breath according to Jesus

Our English word “pneumonia”—a respiratory infection in the air sacs of the lungs that causes difficulty in breathing and can be life-threatening—is derived from the Greek pneuma. Another word is “pneumatics” which is the scientific study of compressed air, not of spirit beings! The Hagios Pneuma typically translated as “Holy Spirit” is literally “Holy Breath.” But because pneuma is consistently mistranslated as “spirit” throughout the New Testament, Trinitarian theologians continue reigning over mainstream Christianity with their teaching that the Hagios Pneuma is a Spirit being or a Person, “a living, self-conscious, rational being; a moral agent.”

After His resurrection, Jesus Himself defined the Hagios Pneuma by literally breathing His own breath out of His own mouth onto His disciples, “And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost [Breath]” (Jhn 20:22). He didn’t just say that Hagios Pneuma is breath, but that there would be no misunderstanding or grounds for arguing whatsoever, He even demonstrated that it is breath! Trinitarian theologians, however, define Hagios Pneuma as a Person that is even co-equal with God. Where did they get this? Why won’t they just agree with Jesus Christ’s definition? If He is truly their Lord then why not submit to the teaching of the Lord?

Many years after His ascension and seating at the right hand of God, Jesus gave seven personal messages to seven churches in Asia. He declared “These things saith the Son of God” (Rev 2:18), and concluded each message with “He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit [Breath] saith unto the churches” (Rev 2:7, 11, 17, 29, 3:6, 13, 22). He called Himself the Breath, not just once or twice but seven times! Trinitarian theologians, on the other hand, teach that the Pneuma is an individual Person—a Peron distinct from the Person of the Son of God. But this isn’t what Jesus Himself taught.

Before His death Jesus had said, “I have yet many things to say unto you, but ye cannot bear them now. Howbeit when he, the Spirit [Breath] of truth, is come, he will guide you into all truth: for he shall not speak of himself; but whatsoever he shall hear, that shall he speak: and he will show you things to come” (Jhn 16:13). This is consistent with Him later giving John the final writing of the Scriptures, “The Revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave unto him, to show unto his servants things which must shortly come to pass” (Rev 1:1). His disciples were not ready to be given the book of Revelation earlier, “I have yet many things to say unto you, but ye cannot bear them now.” He told them beforehand “whatsoever he shall hear, that shall he speak,” then later spoke, “The Revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave unto him.” Christ is the Breath that heard these things from God then spoke them to John. That “he will show you things to come” are the “things which must shortly come to pass” recorded in the book of Revelation.

The Breath of the Father

That the Holy Breath is the Father’s Breath is supported by what Mary and Joseph were both told, “The Holy Ghost [Breath] shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son of God” (Luk 1:35), “Joseph, thou son of David, fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife: for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Ghost [Breath]” (Mat 1:20). If God is a Trinity of Persons with the Holy Breath being the Third, then the Third Person is the Son’s Father, not the First Person. But if the Holy Breath is simply God’s Breath, then God the Father is indeed the Son’s Father.

God the Father’s Breath is also what anointed and empowered Jesus Christ: “And John bare record, saying, I saw the Spirit [Breath] descending from heaven like a dove, and it abode upon him. And I knew him not: but he that sent me to baptize with water, the same said unto me, Upon whom thou shalt see the Spirit [Breath] descending, and remaining on him, the same is he which baptizeth with the Holy Ghost.” (Jhn 1:32-33); “The Spirit [Breath] of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised” (Luk 4:18); “For he whom God hath sent speaketh the words of God: for God giveth not the Spirit [Breath] by measure unto him” (Jhn 3:34); “How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost [Breath] and with power: who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him” (Act 10:38).

Christ performed miracles by the Breath of His Father God: “But if I cast out devils by the Spirit [Breath] of God, then the kingdom of God is come unto you” (Mat 12:28); “Rabbi, we know that thou art a teacher come from God: for no man can do these miracles that thou doest, except God be with him” (Jhn 3:2); “the Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works” (Jhn 14:10); “Ye men of Israel, hear these words; Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know” (Act 2:22); “How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost [Breath] and with power: who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him” (Act 10:38).

Christ declared that His Father was in Him: “If I do not the works of my Father, believe me not. But if I do, though ye believe not me, believe the works: that ye may know, and believe, that the Father is in me, and I in him” (Jhn 10:37-38); “Believest thou not that I am in the Father, and the Father in me? the words that I speak unto you I speak not of myself: but the Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works. Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me: or else believe me for the very works’ sake.” (Jhn 14:10-11); “That they all may be one; as thou, Father, art in me, and I in thee, that they also may be one in us: that the world may believe that thou hast sent me” (Jhn 17:21).

Prior to Christ sending the Holy Breath on the Day of Pentecost, it was the Father’s Breath that was also in the disciples, “For it is not ye that speak, but the Spirit [Breath] of your Father which speaketh in you” (Mat 10:20), “If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children: how much more shall your heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit [Breath] to them that ask him?” (Luk 11:13).

In His incarnation, the Son of God forever relinquished His divine power—the incredible power by which He created the entire universe and all its fullness—and became a human being exactly like us. Therefore, His breath now as a human being has no more power than ours. The Holy Breath is the Father’s own Breath, “But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit [Breath] of truth, which proceedeth from the Father” (Jhn 15:26). But because the Father sent His Breath in Christ’s name, “But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost [Breath], whom the Father will send in my name” (Jhn 14:26), it’s also called “the Spirit [Breath] of Christ” (Rom 8:9), “the Spirit [Breath] of the Lord” (2Co 3:17), “the Spirit [Breath] of his Son” (Gal 4:6).

The Breath is God the Father’s because He will raise us from the dead by His Breath as He raised Christ from the dead, “But if the Spirit [Breath] of him that raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, he that raised up Christ from the dead shall also quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit [Breath] that dwelleth in you” (Rom 8:11), “And God hath both raised up the Lord, and will also raise up us by his own power” (1Co 6:14), “I give thee charge in the sight of God, who quickeneth all things” (1Ti 6:13).

The Breath of the Son

Christ said that He would be in us and with us: “He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him” (Jhn 6:56); “I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you” (Jhn 14:18); “At that day ye shall know that I am in my Father, and ye in me, and I in you” (Jhn 14:20); “Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; no more can ye, except ye abide in me. I am the vine, ye are the branches: He that abideth in me, and I in him” (Jhn 15:4-5); “I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one … that the love wherewith thou hast loved me may be in them, and I in them” (Jhn 17:23, 26); “I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world” (Mat 28:20).

Christ is now within us by the Breath as His Father was within Him by the Breath: “But ye are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit, if so be that the Spirit [Breath] of God dwell in you. Now if any man have not the Spirit [Breath] of Christ, he is none of his. And if Christ be in you” (Rom 8:9-10); “the Spirit [Breath] itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered … It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us” (Rom 8:26, 34); “Now the Lord is that Spirit [Breath]: and where the Spirit [Breath] of the Lord is, there is liberty” (2Co 3:17); “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me” (Gal 2:20); “And because ye are sons, God hath sent forth the Spirit [Breath] of his Son into your hearts, crying, Abba, Father” (Gal 4:6); “to be strengthened with might by his Spirit [Breath] in the inner man; That Christ may dwell in your hearts by faith” (Eph 3:17); “To whom God would make known what is the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles; which is Christ in you, the hope of glory” (Col 1:27).

Trinitarian theologians capitalize upon the few times when personal qualities are attributed to the Breath to claim it as proof of personhood. But any personal qualities are on account of the presence of Jesus Christ through the Breath—the Breath is His presence and He is a Person. For example, it’s argued that the Holy Breath must be a Person because it can be grieved, “And grieve not the holy Spirit [Breath] of God, whereby ye are sealed unto the day of redemption” (Eph 4:30). However, Paul had just stated earlier that the Breath is Christ dwelling in our hearts, “strengthened with might by his Spirit [Breath] in the inner man; That Christ may dwell in your hearts” (Eph 3:16-17). It’s Christ that can be grieved because He is a Person. It was Christ that was the Messenger of the Lord grieved by His people in the days of Moses: “How oft did they provoke him in the wilderness, and grieve him in the desert!” (Psa 78:40); “Forty years long was I grieved with this generation, and said, It is a people that do err in their heart, and they have not known my ways” (Psa 95:10); “But they rebelled, and vexed his holy Spirit: therefore he was turned to be their enemy, and he fought against them” (Isa 63:10).

Likewise the Spirit [Breath] also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit [Breath] itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered. And he that searcheth the hearts knoweth what is the mind of the Spirit [pneuma phronema], because he maketh intercession for the saints according to the will of God. … Who is he that condemneth? It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us. (Romans 8:26-27, 34)

Another example of using Scripture to proof-text personhood to the Breath is the statement in this passage “the mind of the Spirit [pneuma phronema],” that it must be a Person because it has a mind of its own. But Paul used the same Greek phrase pneuma phronema just a little earlier in this same chapter, “For to be carnally minded is death; but to be spiritually minded [pneuma phronema] is life and peace” (Rom 8:6). He was referring back to what he had just taught about those that are spiritually-minded as opposed to those that are carnally-minded. The spiritually-minded are “not in the flesh, but in the Spirit [Breath]” because they have “the Spirit [Breath] of God” or “the Spirit [Breath] of Christ” dwelling in them (Rom 8:9).

This has nothing to do with the Breath as a Person with a mind. It’s because Christ is “he that searcheth the hearts” that He knows the pneuma phronema–He knows who is spiritually-minded and who is not. By the Holy Breath, He knows not only what we do but the very motives of our hearts for what we do, “a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart” (Heb 4:12). The spiritually-minded are those with the indwelling Holy Breath that do what’s right and with the right motives.

When Jesus said, “and all the churches shall know that I am he which searcheth the reins and hearts: and I will give unto every one of you according to your works” (Rev 2:23), He was quoting from Jeremiah, “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it? I the LORD search the heart, I try the reins, even to give every man according to his ways, and according to the fruit of his doings” (Jer 17:10). Although He relinquished His divine powers and is now a human being like us in every regard, He is able to see our hearts by the Breath of God in us. He said to the church at Thyatira, “These things saith the Son of God, who hath his eyes like unto a flame of fire … I am he which searcheth the reins and hearts … let him hear what the Spirit [Breath] saith unto the churches” (Rev 2:18, 23, 29). He is the Breath because the indwelling Breath is a limited manifestation of His presence within us.

Man is alive by God’s Breath

That Hagios Pneuma is God’s own Breath and not a separate individual Spirit being or Person is substantiated by comparing man’s initial creation to life with his subsequent resurrection back to life. In fact, Paul even appealed to the creation of man when teaching about the resurrection, “And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit [breath]” (1Co 15:45), “And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul” (Gen 2:7). Man was created as a physical being and brought to life by God breathing into his nostrils. Since man was initially brought to life by God breathing into his lifeless body, it follows that man is brought to life in resurrection by God once again breathing into his lifeless body.

Many times we’re told that the Breath quickens or gives life: “It is the spirit [breath] that quickeneth” (Jhn 6:63); “the Spirit [Breath] of life” (Rom 8:2); “the Spirit [Breath] is life” (Rom 8:10); “quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit [Breath]” (Rom 8:11); “a quickening breath [breath]” (1Co 15:45); “the spirit [breath] giveth life” (2Co 3:6); “If we live in the Spirit [Breath]” (Gal 5:25); “of the Spirit [Breath] reap life everlasting” (Gal 6:8); “quickened by the Spirit [Breath]” (1Pe 3:18); “the Spirit [Breath] of life from God” (Rev 11:11).

Also, we’re told many times that it was God that raised Jesus from the dead: “whom God hath raised up” (Act 2:24); “This Jesus hath God raised up” (Act 2:32); “whom God hath raised from the dead” (Act 3:15); “God, having raised up his Son Jesus” (Act 3:26); “Him God raised up the third day” (Act 10:40); “But God raised him from the dead” (Act 13:30); “him that raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead” (Rom 4:24); “Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father” (Rom 6:4); “And God hath both raised up the Lord” (1Co 6:14); “he which raised up the Lord Jesus” (2Co 4:14); “God the Father, who raised him from the dead” (Gal 1:1); “Which he wrought in Christ, when he raised him from the dead” (Eph 1:20); “God, who hath raised him from the dead” (Col 2:12); “And to wait for his Son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead” (1Th 1:10); “Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus” (Heb 13:20); “God, that raised him up from the dead” (1Pe 1:21).

The reasonable and logical conclusion is that since the Breath quickens or gives life, and since it was God that raised Jesus from death to life, then the Hagios Pneuma is God’s Breath and not a Person. This reasoning is corroborated by Paul, “the Spirit [Breath] of him that raised up Jesus from the dead” (Rom 8:11). Jesus was raised from the dead by “the Breath of him”—God’s Breath.

The Son of God became a human being just like we are—a physical being alive by God’s breath in His nostrils. When He died, He committed His breath to the Father and breathed His last, “And when Jesus had cried with a loud voice, he said, Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit [breath]: and having said thus, he gave up the ghost [exhaled]” (Luk 23:46). He then “received of the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit [Breath]” (Act 2:33), and was “quickened by the Spirit [Breath]” (1Pe 3:18). Since His resurrection is the exemplar of ours, we also will be raised this same way, “But if the Spirit [Breath] of him that raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, he that raised up Christ from the dead shall also quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit [Breath] that dwelleth in you” (Rom 8:11).

Trinitarian theologians claim that Jesus is “God the Son” and that He actually raised Himself from the dead. They use this verse as a proof-text, “Jesus answered and said unto them, Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up” (Jhn 2:19). But since His resurrection is the exemplar of ours, if He really did raise Himself from the dead then there’s no hope for us because we can’t raise ourselves from the dead! There are two main reasons Jesus made that statement. First, it was to set up the corrupt religious leaders so that they would have a false accusation to put Him to death, “At the last came two false witnesses, And said, This fellow said, I am able to destroy the temple of God, and to build it in three days” (Mat 26:60-61). Second, it was a prophecy intended to strengthen the faith of His disciples after its fulfillment, “When therefore he was risen from the dead, his disciples remembered that he had said this unto them; and they believed the scripture, and the word which Jesus had said” (Jhn 2:22).

Rather than all of the Trinitarian claims about spirit persons—that the Holy Spirit [Breath] is a Person, and that man is a spirit person living inside a body, and that Christ covered His Spirit Person with flesh in the incarnation—what makes more sense is that man is a physical being alive by God’s Breath in his nostrils. Christ became a human being and breathed His last when He died, but was brought back to life by God breathing into His nostrils. Our only hope of eternal life, therefore, is having God’s indwelling Breath as an earnest or pledge that after we breathe our last, God will breathe life into us again as He did with His Son Jesus Christ.

Blasphemy against the Breath

The Holy Breath is “the Spirit [Breath] of truth” (Jhn 14:17, 15:26, 16:13). Once we’ve come to the knowledge of the truth and are no longer ignorant, God requires it of us. Blasphemy against the Breath is blasphemy against the truth for which God will never forgive, “Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost [Breath] shall not be forgiven unto men” (Mat 12:31).

But when the Jews saw the multitudes, they were filled with envy, and spake against those things which were spoken by Paul, contradicting and blaspheming. Then Paul and Barnabas waxed bold, and said, It was necessary that the word of God should first have been spoken to you: but seeing ye put it from you, and judge yourselves unworthy of everlasting life, lo, we turn to the Gentiles. (Acts 13:45-46)

God kept His own people ignorant of the truth in order to fulfill His plan of salvation through His Son Jesus Christ. Here in Antioch of Pisidia, once the Jews heard the truth about Jesus Christ from Paul and Barnabas, they were no longer ignorant. For them to now contradict and speak maliciously against the truth they had heard was blasphemy against the Breath—the presence of Jesus Christ Himself in Paul and Barnabas—for which they would never be forgiven. They judged themselves and forever forfeited eternal life. Once we’ve been given a clear line of demarcation between truth and error, God requires a judgment or decision from us.

Trinitarian theologians, on the other hand, claim that blasphemy against the Breath is denying that the Breath is a Person. Essentially, it’s denying what they teach! In that case, although blasphemy against the Breath cannot be forgiven, blasphemy against Trinitarian theologians can be forgiven! But seriously, the sobering reality is that once we come to the knowledge of the truth that Jesus taught yet willingly contradict and speak against it, we’re in danger of blasphemy against Him. Therefore, and sadly, it’s the Trinitarian theologians that are in danger of committing this unpardonable sin once they’re no longer sincerely ignorant of the truth taught by Jesus Christ. Willful sin against the truth will never be forgiven, “For if we sin wilfully after that we have received the knowledge of the truth, there remaineth no more sacrifice for sins” (Heb 10:26).

Those against the King

The Greek christos transliterated into English as “Christ” is the equivalent of the Hebrew mashiyach transliterated as “Messiah.” It means “anointed” and is the title of the king. Saul was called mashiyach by both Samuel and David, “The LORD is witness against you, and his anointed [mashiyach]” (1Sa 12:5), “the LORD’S anointed [mashiyach] … he is the anointed [mashiyach] of the LORD” (1Sa 24:6). David was also called mashiyach, “the anointed [mashiyach] of the God of Jacob” (2Sa 23:1). And it was prophesied by both David and Daniel that Jesus would be mashiyach, “The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the LORD, and against his anointed [mashiyach]” (Psa 2:2), “unto the Messiah [mashiyach] the Prince shall be seven weeks … And after threescore and two weeks shall Messiah [mashiyach] be cut off” (Dan 9:25, 26).

The verb “anoint” simply means “to rub,” “to smear,” or “to pour upon.” Samuel anointed both Saul and David to be king by pouring oil upon their head, “Then Samuel took a vial of oil, and poured it upon his head, and kissed him, and said, Is it not because the LORD hath anointed thee to be captain over his inheritance? …  And when they came thither to the hill, behold, a company of prophets met him; and the Spirit [Breath] of God came upon him, and he prophesied among them.” (1Sa 10:1, 10), “Then Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the midst of his brethren: and the Spirit [Breath] of the LORD came upon David from that day forward. So Samuel rose up, and went to Ramah” (1Sa 16:13). But the oil was only symbolic. It was the Breath of God that came upon them at that time which set them apart as the king.

Jesus of Nazareth was anointed by God at His baptism, “the Spirit [Breath] descending from heaven like a dove, and it abode upon him” (Jhn 1:32). But the water was only symbolic. It was God’s Breath that came upon Him that sanctified or set Him apart as the Christ, the Anointed, the King, “The Spirit [Breath] of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me” (Luk 4:18), “How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost [Breath] and with power: who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him” (Act 10:38).

Trinitarian theologians teach that Christ cast out devils by His own divine power as “God the Son,” but Jesus Himself said that He cast them out by the Breath of God, “But if I cast out devils by the Spirit [Breath] of God, then the kingdom of God is come unto you” (Mat 12:28). Who should we believe, Christ or the theologians? The power of God’s Breath to heal, work miracles, and cast out devils were signs that the King and the Kingdom of God had come. Denying that His supernatural power was by the anointing of the Breath of God is by implication denying Him as the King.

Furthermore, teaching that we are nonphysical beings that go to heaven after death, disallows our true destiny of resurrection to eternal life and inheritance in Christ’s Kingdom on this earth. Christ and His apostles never taught that we go to heaven but that we enter into, or inherit the Kingdom: “Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven” (Mat 7:21); “Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven” (Mat 18:3); “Verily I say unto you, That a rich man shall hardly enter into the kingdom of heaven” (Mat 19:23); “Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world” (Mat 25:34); “Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God?” (1Co 6:9), “Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God” (1Co 15:50); “that they which do such things shall not inherit the kingdom of God” (Gal 5:21); “For this ye know, that no whoremonger, nor unclean person, nor covetous man, who is an idolater, hath any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and of God” (Eph 5:5); “Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son” (Col 1:13); “That ye would walk worthy of God, who hath called you unto his kingdom and glory” (2Th 2:12); “Hearken, my beloved brethren, Hath not God chosen the poor of this world rich in faith, and heirs of the kingdom which he hath promised to them that love him?” (Jas 2:5); “For so an entrance shall be ministered unto you abundantly into the everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ” (2Pe 1:11); “I John, who also am your brother, and companion in tribulation, and in the kingdom and patience of Jesus Christ” (Rev 1:9).

Jesus blessed Peter’s confession that He is the Christ or King, the Son of God, “Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God. And Jesus answered and said unto him, Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona” (Mat 16:16-17). In harmony with this confession, the apostle John wrote, “Who is a liar but he that denieth that Jesus is the Christ? He is antichrist [antichristos], that denieth the Father and the Son. Whosoever denieth the Son, the same hath not the Father” (1Jo 2:22-23). An antichristos is literally an adversary or opponent of the king!

Antichrists deny that Jesus is the King and that He is the Son. Although Trinitarian theologians affirm both, taken to its logical conclusion, the doctrine of the Trinity actually infringes upon both. Teaching that His miracles were by His own divine power, and teaching that we go to heaven after death by implication deny His Kingdom and Him as King. And teaching that God is three co-equal Persons, “God the Father,” “God the Son,” and “God the Holy Spirit,” denies the Father as the one true God and Jesus as the Son of God. Trinitarian teaching, by logical deduction, denies what Peter affirmed that Jesus is the King, the Son of God.

“And Jesus answered and said unto them, Take heed that no man deceive you. For many shall come in my name, saying, I am Christ; and shall deceive many” (Mat 24:4-5). Jesus wasn’t talking about those who falsely claim to be the Christ themselves. He was saying that many will rightly affirm that Jesus is the Christ, but will deceive many with false teachings about Him. They will affirm Him as Christ or King, but teach things that are against Him as King—the very thing that Trinitarian theologians are doing. “Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ” (Col 2:8).

Jesus told the parable of the nobleman who went away to receive a kingdom, “He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return. And he called his ten servants, and delivered them ten pounds, and said unto them, Occupy till I come.” (Luk 19:12-13). As servants of the King, we are to be using the “pounds” He delivered to us for His purposes in furthering His kingdom until He returns, “But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness” (Mat 6:33). Trinitarian theologians teach that Christ worked miracles, not by the anointing of God’s Breath as the King but by His own power as “God the Son.” They teach, not that we’re raised from the dead at Christ’s return to inherit His kingdom but that we all go to heaven after we die. By not submitting to what He taught in furthering His kingdom, they’re essentially saying “We will not have this man to reign over us” (Luk 19:14).

Then cometh the end, when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he shall have put down all rule and all authority and power. For he must reign, till he hath put all enemies under his feet. The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death. For he hath put all things under his feet. But when he saith all things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put all things under him. And when all things shall be subdued unto him, then shall the Son also himself be subject unto him that put all things under him, that God may be all in all. (1 Corinthians 15:24-28)

Here Paul taught that God is the Father, and that His Son will forever be subject to Him. This is not the “co-equal” doctrine that Trinitarian theologians teach. Who is right, the apostle Paul or the theologians?

That God has “put all things under his feet” is a quote from David about Adam, “Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet: All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field; The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas” (Psa 8:6-8). Adam was given dominion over every creature he named, “And Adam gave names to all cattle, and to the fowl of the air, and to every beast of the field; but for Adam there was not found an help meet for him” (Gen 2:20). This was figurative and prophetic of Christ’s Kingdom—His authority over every name that is named and all things being put under His feet, “Far above all principality, and power, and might, and dominion, and every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come: And hath put all things under his feet” (Eph 1:21-22). Now we understand what He meant by “Then shall the King say unto them on his right hand, Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world” (Mat 25:34). Christ’s Kingdom was prepared from the very beginning as seen in a mystery in the dominion given to Adam. Therefore, God’s plan of salvation and the true gospel message from the very beginning has always been Christ’s Kingdom, “In the beginning was the Word” (Jhn 1:1).

The saving gospel message is the preaching of the Kingdom of God. This is what Christ preached throughout His ministry: “And Jesus went about all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing all manner of sickness and all manner of disease among the people” (Mat 4:23); “And Jesus went about all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing every sickness and every disease among the people” (Mat 9:35); “And as ye go, preach, saying, The kingdom of heaven is at hand” (Mat 10:7); “And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come” (Mat 24:14); “And he said unto them, I must preach the kingdom of God to other cities also: for therefore am I sent” (Luk 4:43); “And it came to pass afterward, that he went throughout every city and village, preaching and shewing the glad tidings of the kingdom of God: and the twelve were with him” (Luk 8:1); “And he sent them to preach the kingdom of God, and to heal the sick” (Luk 9:2); “And heal the sick that are therein, and say unto them, The kingdom of God is come nigh unto you” (Luk 10:9).

This is also what was preached from the first chapter of the book of Acts through the last: “To whom also he shewed himself alive after his passion by many infallible proofs, being seen of them forty days, and speaking of the things pertaining to the kingdom of God” (Act 1:3); “But when they believed Philip preaching the things concerning the kingdom of God, and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women” (Act 8:12); “And he went into the synagogue, and spake boldly for the space of three months, disputing and persuading the things concerning the kingdom of God” (Act 19:8); “And now, behold, I know that ye all, among whom I have gone preaching the kingdom of God, shall see my face no more” (Act 20:25); “And when they had appointed him a day, there came many to him into his lodging; to whom he expounded and testified the kingdom of God” (Act 28:23); “And Paul dwelt two whole years in his own hired house, and received all that came in unto him, Preaching the kingdom of God” (Act 28:30-31).

Antichrists are adversaries or opponents of the king. Trinitarian theologians don’t teach the kingdom of God in which the Father is God and the Son is forever subject to Him, “when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father … then shall the Son also himself be subject unto him that put all things under him, that God may be all in all” (1Co 15:24, 28). Instead, they teach co-equality. And they don’t teach that Jesus was anointed by God’s Breath as King to cast out devils and heal the sick, “But if I cast out devils by the Spirit [Breath] of God, then the kingdom of God is come unto you” (Mat 12:28), “How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost [Breath] and with power: who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him” (Act 10:38), but that He did these things by His own divine power as a 100% divine being in the flesh. Whether or not they truly are antichrists is Christ’s decision but their teaching essentially implicates them as such.

The Roman Catholic Church

So he carried me away in the spirit into the wilderness: and I saw a woman sit upon a scarlet coloured beast, full of names of blasphemy, having seven heads and ten horns. And the woman was arrayed in purple and scarlet colour, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls, having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication: And upon her forehead was a name written, MYSTERY, BABYLON THE GREAT, THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS AND ABOMINATIONS OF THE EARTH. And I saw the woman drunken with the blood of the saints, and with the blood of the martyrs of Jesus: and when I saw her, I wondered with great admiration. (Revelation 17:3-6)

It has been astutely noted that this woman is likely the Roman Catholic Church (RCC). Her attire is the pomp and pageantry of her popes and cardinals decked in purple and scarlet, gold and precious stones. She established the doctrine of the Trinity by anathematizing and putting to death any that disagreed with her. She is drunk with the blood of the saints and martyrs that stood for the truth taught by Jesus Christ. And she is “THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS” by virtue of having given birth to multitudes of Protestant Trinitarian churches all over the world, committing fornication with the Trinity rather than worshipping “the only true God” (Jhn 17:3) the Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ.

The reason the Trinity is the majority mainstream Protestant Christian view of God is that her mother established it by force hundreds of years ago. And the reason it remains the majority mainstream view is because of overwhelming pressure to stay conformed to it. Anyone denying the Trinity will be removed, publicly shamed as a blasphemer and heretic, categorized with Jehovah’s Witnesses, and given over to the fear of burning in fire forever. The bottom line is that nobody should dare question this doctrine. They claim it as part of “the faith which was once delivered unto the saints” (Jde 1:3), though it was delivered by the RCC.

Now the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils; Speaking lies in hypocrisy; having their conscience seared with a hot iron; Forbidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from meats, which God hath created to be received with thanksgiving of them which believe and know the truth. (1 Timothy 4:1-3)

Paul described the RCC here quite descriptively. They forbid their priests from marrying and require abstaining from meat on Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, and all Fridays during Lent. And this is what the Breath spoke expressly or specifically would happen in the latter times.

Jesus Christ was sent by God and never taught the doctrine of the Trinity. He taught that He is the Son of God and that His Father is God and even His God. The doctrine of a Triune God didn’t come from Him! Then from whom did it come? What’s its source? The Breath said that “doctrines of devils” come from those forbidding marriage and requiring abstinence from meat, and the doctrine of the Trinity came from the very organization that fits this description.

We’re told, however, that in the end times God’s people will come out from this woman, “Come out of her, my people, that ye be not partakers of her sins, and that ye receive not of her plagues” (Rev 18:4). Within the RCC and Protestant churches are many of God’s people in spite of holding to the doctrine of the Trinity. It’s because they embrace this doctrine in sincere ignorance that God is gracious and merciful to them. But the day will come when they’ll no longer be ignorant of the truth and will be required to either come out or stay and receive of her plagues.

Conclusion

The dilemma faced by Trinitarian theologians is that the more educated, scholarly, and intelligent they are, the less excuse they have for being wrong about this most important doctrine of all—the doctrine of God. Especially since this doctrine is quite simple, logical, and easy to understand:

At that time Jesus answered and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes. Even so, Father: for so it seemed good in thy sight. All things are delivered unto me of my Father: and no man knoweth the Son, but the Father; neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son will reveal him. (Matthew 11:25-27)

It’s easy enough to understand what God the Father and the Son of God said about each other that even a child can understand it! Since theologians are so brilliant, why can’t they? Why reject the simple and logical for the complex and illogical? Why teach a view of God that’s illogical and requires complex and lengthy arguments to attempt to explain? In fact, many of them even surrender and claim that it’s some kind of mystery that nobody can understand. Could it be that “the wise and prudent” just have too much to lose?

By the time Christ came, the Jewish people had developed a religious system with which they had grown comfortable, and it became very difficult to turn away from and forsake. They were in bondage to the doctrines of men and didn’t want to repent and submit to the doctrines of Jesus Christ. They loved the praise of men and didn’t want to be removed from the synagogue, scorned by their own family, and persecuted for following the truth. Unlike most Gentiles, they had too much to lose. The Pharisees in particular, with Saul of Tarsus as the prime example, had the most to lose:

Circumcised the eighth day, of the stock of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, an Hebrew of the Hebrews; as touching the law, a Pharisee; Concerning zeal, persecuting the church; touching the righteousness which is in the law, blameless. But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ. Yea doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ. (Philippians 3:5-8)

In a similar way as the Pharisees (and not implying that Trinitarian theologians are Pharisees), Trinitarian theologians and ministers have grown comfortable with the theological and denominational systems to which they belong and have much to lose if they were to admit that the doctrine of the Trinity is false. The far-reaching implications are that if they agree with what the Father and Son said about each other, not only will their theological system topple to rubble but possibly their own ministry and reputation. They earned seminary degrees, wrote books, taught multitudes of messages, established a reputation and name for themselves, and raised untold amounts of money in the process. It’s extremely difficult for them to now tell everyone, “I’m sorry, I was wrong about God.”

What are they going to do? Are they willing to forsake it all in order to continue following Christ, or will they speak against Christ and continue defending their system? “For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?” (Mat 16:26). Many ministers are sincerely innocent in their ignorance. They truly believe what they had been taught in the seminaries and have already built their lives and ministries upon it. Once they come to learn that the doctrine of the Trinity and much of the accompanying theological system is false, it’s extremely difficult for them to forsake it all.

I recognize this dilemma personally because it was very difficult for me to repent of this false doctrine and I’m not even in the ministry. I didn’t have nearly as much to lose as ministers yet it was still a long and difficult process. Therefore, I’m striving to be patient, understanding, and merciful toward those struggling with a similar predicament. I hope to see them free as well.

The names of the 12 apostles will be written on the foundation stones of the wall around the city of Jerusalem that will come down from heaven, “And the wall of the city had twelve foundations, and in them the names of the twelve apostles of the Lamb” (Rev 21:14). Jesus said that if we overcome then our names will be written on one of the stones in the wall, “He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches; To him that overcometh will I give to eat of the hidden manna, and will give him a white stone, and in the stone a new name written, which no man knoweth saving he that receiveth it” (Rev 2:17).

Where do we want to see our names written? Do we want our names on a church membership roll, on a book, on a building, on the big screen, on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, or on the wall surrounding the New Jerusalem? Until we’re willing to let our own name and reputation become trash, “I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ” (Phl 3:5-8), we’re not worthy of being called by His glorious name. For Him to one day give us a stone in the wall with a new name written, we must forsake our own name and live for the glory of His.

Trinitarian theologians declare that the fight against the doctrine of the Trinity is unrelenting which supposedly indicates that what they teach must be true otherwise people wouldn’t be fighting against it so persistently. But the real reason the fight is unrelenting is because the doctrine of the Trinity is false and they won’t stop teaching it! They claim that history proves Trinitarians have always come out the winners. But of course they’ve always won—they’ve simply cast out any that opposed them. The true winners, however, are not the self-declared but the Christ-declared.

Trinitarian theologians tell us to not only read the Bible but also the books they recommend. This is how they keep everyone on an even-keel with their theological system, ensuring that the Bible continues to be read through the lens of their doctrines. But following the Lord is not about following a theological system or a denomination. It’s about sincerely seeking the truth and submitting ourselves to it once we find it. Their books are not intended to help us with doing that.

He that is of God heareth God’s words: ye therefore hear them not, because ye are not of God” (Jhn 8:47), “We are of God: he that knoweth God heareth us; he that is not of God heareth not us. Hereby know we the spirit [breath] of truth, and the spirit of error.” (1Jo 4:6). If we are “of God” and “know God” then we will hear the teaching of His Son Jesus Christ and His apostles. We will hear the truth and love the truth that glorifies the Lord and blesses people. This is how we know “the Spirit [Breath] of truth” (Jhn 14:17, 15:26, 16:13; 1Jo 4:6). But if we stubbornly cling to what we know is false, we demonstrate that we really don’t love the Lord or people. We’re more concerned about self-preservation—our own name and reputation, praise from people, comfort, and support.

Paul said that the first piece of “the whole armour of God” (Eph 6:11, 13) is the truth, “Stand therefore, having your loins girt about with truth” (Eph 6:14). And he had written earlier that the truth is what Jesus Christ taught, “But ye have not so learned Christ; If so be that ye have heard him, and have been taught by him, as the truth is in Jesus” (Eph 4:20-21). The truth that Jesus taught and what Paul wrote in this same letter is “the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Eph 1:3), “One God and Father of all” (Eph 4:6). If we’re not submitted to the truth about God that Jesus taught, then we’re not protected with the whole armor but vulnerable to the devil. “Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.” (Mat 5:11-12). But those that are standing for the truth that Jesus Christ taught are doing it for His sake, for His glory and not for themselves. They’re blessed by Him and rejoice exceedingly because of the reward He will give them one day. On the other hand, “For whosoever shall be ashamed of me and of my words, of him shall the Son of man be ashamed, when he shall come in his own glory, and in his Father’s, and of the holy angels” (Luk 9:26).

True Theology – Part 1

Introduction

It has been rightly said that a strong walk with God begins with a right view of God. My walk with God has grown far more in the last couple of years than it did over the prior three decades as a Christian. It’s because I rejected the doctrine of the Trinity as false and began honoring God with a more accurate view of Him.

I had spent about two years trying to avoid studying the doctrine of the Trinity from an objective standpoint in fear that my final conclusion would be that it’s false—I didn’t want it to be false. I understood the personal ramifications and consequences of rejecting what is considered by my fellow brethren to be an essential doctrine for salvation. I realized that I would be seen by some and possibly by many as unsaved, a false teacher, unintelligent, or even a fool. Of course God knew that I was ignoring this subject but wouldn’t allow me to do it any longer. I eventually began studying it and did in fact conclude that it’s false.

The Roman Catholic Church—notorious for numerous false doctrines such as transubstantiation, indulgences, prayer to saints—is also the main purveyor of the doctrine of the Trinity. All false doctrine originates from the devil and ultimately impairs our walk with God. When we’re ignorant and innocent of something being false—when we sincerely assume a doctrine is true though it actually isn’t—God will be merciful and forgiving as he was with Paul, “Who was before a blasphemer, and a persecutor, and injurious: but I obtained mercy, because I did it ignorantly in unbelief” (1Ti 1:13). In fact, God kept His plan of salvation hidden in a mystery so that the corrupt religious leaders would crucify His Son yet afterward still have the opportunity to be forgiven in their ignorance, “Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do” (Luk 23:34), “And now, brethren, I wot that through ignorance ye did it, as did also your rulers” (Act 3:17).

However, blasphemy against the Spirit will never be forgiven, “Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men” (Mat 12:31). Once we’re no longer ignorant of the truth yet stubbornly rebel against it, we’re in danger of blaspheming against the Spirit. This is what happened to King Saul, “For rebellion is as the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is as iniquity and idolatry. Because thou hast rejected the word of the LORD, he hath also rejected thee from being king.” (1Sa 15:23), “But the Spirit of the LORD departed from Saul, and an evil spirit from the LORD troubled him” (1Sa 16:14). He stubbornly and willfully rebelled against “the word of the Lord,” therefore, “the Spirit of the Lord” left him forever.

Once we know and understand the truth in our hearts yet stubbornly, rebelliously, and willfully sin against it, “For if we sin wilfully after that we have received the knowledge of the truth, there remaineth no more sacrifice for sins” (Heb 10:26), we will never be forgiven. We can’t stubbornly argue with God about the truth and still be in a right relationship with Him.

The Greek diakrino means “to contend,” “to dispute,” or “to argue,” “He staggered [diakrino 1252] not at the promise of God through unbelief; but was strong in faith [faithfulness], giving glory to God” (Rom 4:20), “But let him ask in faith [faithfulness], nothing wavering [diakrino 1252]. For he that wavereth [diakrino 1252] is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed. For let not that man think that he shall receive any thing of the Lord. A double minded man is unstable in all his ways.” (Jas 1:6-8). If we’re arguing or contending with God about the truth, then we’re not being faithful servants and we won’t be right before Him. Of course God knows if our hearts are sincerely ignorant or blatantly rebellious.

Scholars and theologians teach that salvation beliefs can be categorized basically into essential and non-essential. That is, certain beliefs must be held in order to be saved while other beliefs are only optional and can be disagreed and debated. Of course they claim that the doctrine of the Trinity is one of the essential beliefs and isn’t open for disagreement, debate, or even discussion. However, this “essential” and “non-essential” belief categorization isn’t entirely accurate. It’s truth that’s essential.

Any and all truth that we’re no longer ignorant about is essential for salvation and righteousness before God. We can’t reject any truth that we sincerely know to be true, and we can’t embrace anything false that we sincerely know to be false. Therefore, once I came to the knowledge that the doctrine of the Trinity is false, it was actually essential for my salvation to NOT believe and hold this doctrine anymore. I couldn’t continue to embrace this false doctrine that I knew in my heart was false and still be right with God. He wouldn’t allow it. God had been merciful to me all of the years that I believed this doctrine because He knew I was sincerely ignorant of the truth. But once I was no longer ignorant, He required it of me.

What is meant by the Greek theos?

The Greek theos for “god” is simply sovereign or ultimate and highest authority. It’s a role, position, or title of a person in authority, not a kind or type of being. The Father is God, not because of what He is as a being, but because of His status as the highest authority over all, including over His Son Jesus Christ. That theos is a role or position of authority is evident by the Son of God Himself using this word for men and also for His Father within the same statement.

Jesus answered them, Is it not written in your law, I said, Ye are gods [theos 2316]? If he called them gods [theos 2316], unto whom the word of God [theos 2316] came, and the scripture cannot be broken; Say ye of him, whom the Father hath sanctified, and sent into the world, Thou blasphemest; because I said, I am the Son of God [theos 2316]? (John 10:34-36)

Jesus said that God called these humans “gods.” But which is it? Were they humans or were they gods? If theos truly is a type of being, then these men were both humans and gods at the same time—a type of Hypostatic Union of two natures! On the other hand, if theos is truly a role, position, title, or status then these men were simply human beings standing in a position of authority in which they could be called “gods” within a limited context of rule and authority. In fact, after declaring “Ye are gods” (Psa 82:6), God then affirmed their humanity, “But ye shall die like men” (Psa 82:7). They were not some kind of divine beings, but merely human beings that would die just like all humans.

This is one of the main problems caused by the doctrine of the Trinity because if theos is actually a kind or type of being then when Jesus became a human being then there had to have been a union of two natures together at the same time or else He would have ceased to be the theos type of being—He would have ceased to be God. But if theos is simply a position of authority, and in this case the highest position of authority which never has been occupied by the Son, then this is a complete non-issue with regards to Him becoming fully human. There really is no dilemma between a theos kind of being and a human kind of being in one person because there is no such thing as a theos kind of being.

Furthermore, if theos is truly a type of being then the statement “I am the God [theos] of Abraham, and the God [theos] of Isaac, and the God [theos] of Jacob” (Mat 22:32), means that God belongs to them as their possession! But since it’s saying that He is Abraham’s God, and Isaac’s God, and Jacob’s God then it’s simply that He is their Ruler. Putting this on a human level, if you’re speaking of your boss at work you wouldn’t say “my human being” but “my boss.” Therefore, theos is not a type of being. To be the God of Abraham is to be the Ruler of Abraham. He’s Abraham’s Boss!

Is God a plurality of Persons?

The Trinitarian claim that the one God exists in a plurality of Persons conflicts with how Christ Himself understood and used the word theos: “Jesus answered them, Is it not written in your law, I said, Ye are gods [theos]? If he called them gods [theos], unto whom the word of God [theos] came, and the scripture cannot be broken” (Jhn 10:34-35). According to Christ, a plurality of persons is a plurality of gods but a singular Person is the singular God. In other words, theos is singular or plural depending on the number of persons.

Paul also understood and used theos the same way: “For though there be that are called gods [theos], whether in heaven or in earth, (as there be gods [theos] many, and lords many,) But to us there is but one God [theos], the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him.” (1Co 8:5-6). He understood that gods are plural when there is more than one person but singular when there is only one person.

Since multiple persons requires theos to be plural, then multiple Persons in the Trinity demands that Trinitarianism is actually polytheism. Of course Trinitarians flatly deny this and claim that it’s truly monotheism. However, that’s only their claim. Scripture is the authority and there is nothing in Scripture that supports the concept of multiple co-equal persons comprising a singular god.

Take for example the United States Supreme court consisting of nine justices. The reason it’s comprised of an odd number of persons is for the very reason that they’re co-equal but often disagree! And it’s not one justice consisting of nine persons—it’s nine co-equal justices. Thus, nine persons are nine justices. On the other hand, if one justice were to always be completely just, then only one justice would be needed. There’s no purpose for multiple co-equal persons that always agree and are always just.

There is only one God

Of course the Shema in the Old Testament Scriptures defined God as one, “Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God is one LORD: And thou shalt love The LORD thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might.” (Deu 6:4-5). Jesus quoted these words then agreed with the statement of the scribe to whom He was speaking, “And Jesus answered him, The first of all the commandments is, Hear, O Israel; The Lord our God is one Lord … And the scribe said unto him, Well, Master, thou hast said the truth: for there is one God; and there is none other but he” (Mar 12:29, 32).

These words spake Jesus, and lifted up his eyes to heaven, and said, Father, the hour is come; glorify thy Son, that thy Son also may glorify thee: As thou hast given him power over all flesh, that he should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given him. And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent. (John 17:1-3)

Here Jesus called His Father “the only true God” and distinguished Himself from Him. It’s not only that Jesus never did call Himself God, but also that He did call His Father God—and even called Him “the only true God.” Paul affirmed this:

As concerning therefore the eating of those things that are offered in sacrifice unto idols, we know that an idol is nothing in the world, and that there is none other God but one. For though there be that are called gods, whether in heaven or in earth, (as there be gods many, and lords many,) But to us there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him. (1 Corinthians 8:4-6).

God the Father is the one and only true God in His role and status as the Sovereign, Almighty, and highest supreme authority over all: “the LORD he is God; there is none else beside him” (Deu 4:35); “Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God is one LORD” (Deu 6:4); “I am the LORD: that is my name: and my glory will I not give to another” (Isa 42:8); “Is there a God beside me? yea, there is no God; I know not any” (Isa 44:8); “I am the LORD, and there is none else, there is no God beside me … there is none beside me. I am the LORD, and there is none else” (Isa 45:5-6); “I am God, and there is none else; I am God, and there is none like me” (Isa 46:9); “But the LORD is the true God, he is the living God” (Jer 10:10); “there is one God; and there is none other but he” (Mar 12:32); “that they might know thee the only true God” (Jhn 17:3); “there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him” (1Co 8:6); “One God and Father of all, who is above all” (Eph 4:6); “Thou believest that there is one God; thou doest well” (Jas 2:19); “For there is one God” (1Ti 2:5).

The Father is God

Trinitarians often use the terms “God the Father,” “God the Son,” and “God the Holy Spirit.” The term “God the Father” is Scriptural and appears several times in the New Testament but the terms “God the Son” and “God the Holy Spirit” are not found even once! It seems these terms were simply coined by Trinitarians to support their doctrine.

It’s quite staggering the number of places we’re told that the Father is God. Below is not a complete listing but only most of the main statements. And many of these also distinguish the Lord Jesus Christ from God the Father. Therefore, it’s not only that the Father is identified as God but also that the Son is not. Furthermore, the Holy Spirit is suspiciously absent as well.

“No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him” (Jhn 1:18); “Therefore the Jews sought the more to kill him, because he not only had broken the sabbath, but said also that God was his Father, making himself equal with God” (Jhn 5:18); “Labour not for the meat which perisheth, but for that meat which endureth unto everlasting life, which the Son of man shall give unto you: for him hath God the Father sealed” (Jhn 6:27); “Not that any man hath seen the Father, save he which is of God, he hath seen the Father” (Jhn 6:46); “Jesus knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he was come from God, and went to God” (Jhn 13:3); “For the Father himself loveth you, because ye have loved me, and have believed that I came out from God” (Jhn 16:27); “Jesus saith unto her, Touch me not; for I am not yet ascended to my Father: but go to my brethren, and say unto them, I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God” (Jhn 20:17); “Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear” (Act 2:33); “To all that be in Rome, beloved of God, called to be saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom 1:7); “That ye may with one mind and one mouth glorify God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.” (Rom 15:6); “Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ” (1Co 1:3); “But to us there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him” (1Co 8:6); “Then cometh the end, when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he shall have put down all rule and all authority and power” (1Co 15:24); “Grace be to you and peace from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ. Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort” (2Co 1:2-3); “The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which is blessed for evermore, knoweth that I lie not” (2Co 11:31); “Paul, an apostle, (not of men, neither by man, but by Jesus Christ, and God the Father, who raised him from the dead;) … Grace be to you and peace from God the Father, and from our Lord Jesus Christ, Who gave himself for our sins, that he might deliver us from this present evil world, according to the will of God and our Father” (Gal 1:1, 3-4); “Grace be to you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ. Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ … That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of him” (Eph 1:2-3, 17); “One God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all” (Eph 4:6); “Giving thanks always for all things unto God and the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Eph 5:20); “Peace be to the brethren, and love with faith, from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Eph 6:23); “Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.” (Phl 1:2); “And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Phl 2:11); “Now unto God and our Father be glory for ever and ever. Amen.” (Phl 4:20); “To the saints and faithful brethren in Christ which are at Colosse: Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. We give thanks to God and the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, praying always for you” (Col 1:2-3); “And whatsoever ye do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God and the Father by him” (Col 3:17); “Paul, and Silvanus, and Timotheus, unto the church of the Thessalonians which is in God the Father and in the Lord Jesus Christ: Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ … Remembering without ceasing your work of faith, and labour of love, and patience of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ, in the sight of God and our Father” (1Th 1:3); “Now God himself and our Father, and our Lord Jesus Christ, direct our way unto you … To the end he may stablish your hearts unblameable in holiness before God, even our Father, at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ with all his saints” (1Th 3:11, 13); “Paul, and Silvanus, and Timotheus, unto the church of the Thessalonians in God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ: Grace unto you, and peace, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (2Th 1:1-2); “Now our Lord Jesus Christ himself, and God, even our Father, which hath loved us, and hath given us everlasting consolation and good hope through grace” (2Th 2:16); “Unto Timothy, my own son in the faith: Grace, mercy, and peace, from God our Father and Jesus Christ our Lord” (1Ti 1:2); “To Timothy, my dearly beloved son: Grace, mercy, and peace, from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord” (2Ti 1:2); “To Titus, mine own son after the common faith: Grace, mercy, and peace, from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ our Saviour” (Tit 1:4); “Grace to you, and peace, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Phm 1:3); “Pure religion and undefiled before God and the Father is this, To visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, and to keep himself unspotted from the world” (Jas 1:27); “Therewith bless we God, even the Father; and therewith curse we men, which are made after the similitude of God” (Jas 3:9); “Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through sanctification of the Spirit, unto obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ: Grace unto you, and peace, be multiplied. Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which according to his abundant mercy hath begotten us again unto a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead” (1Pe 1:2-3); “For he received from God the Father honour and glory, when there came such a voice to him from the excellent glory, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased” (2Pe 1:17); “Grace be with you, mercy, and peace, from God the Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of the Father, in truth and love” (2Jo 1:3); Jude, the servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are sanctified by God the Father, and preserved in Jesus Christ, and called” (Jde 1:1); “And hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.” (Rev 1:6)

Jesus Christ claimed to be the Son of God

Jesus is called and also called Himself the Son of God: “that holy thing which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son of God” (Luk 1:35); “Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God. And Jesus answered and said unto him, Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona” (Mat 16:16-17); “If thou be the Son of God, come down from the cross … for he said, I am the Son of God” (Mat 27:40, 43); “Truly this man was the Son of God” (Mar 15:39); “Then said they all, Art thou then the Son of God? And he said unto them, Ye say that I am.” (Luk 22:70); “Dost thou believe on the Son of God? … Thou hast both seen him, and it is he that talketh with thee” (Jhn 9:35, 37); “Say ye of him, whom the Father hath sanctified, and sent into the world, Thou blasphemest; because I said, I am the Son of God?” (Jhn 10:36); “that the Son of God might be glorified thereby” (Jhn 11:4); “We have a law, and by our law he ought to die, because he made himself the Son of God” (Jhn 19:7).

Several times Jesus called Himself and was acknowledged as having called Himself “the Son of God” but never once did He call Himself “God.” In fact, calling Himself “the Son of God” is actually distinguishing Himself from God—that He is not God but His Son. God is not His Son but has a Son, and His Son is not God but is His Son. If, for example, someone claimed to be the son of the President of the United States we wouldn’t have any difficulty understanding that they’re not claiming to be the President but his son.

Trinitarians have much difficulty deflecting this truth because truth is hard to fight! It’s a bit humorous that when they must address this issue they usually preface it by saying, “Some people say that Jesus never claimed to be God,” as if nervously reluctant to even start. Their typical approach begins with either glossing over the claim “Son of God” to actually mean “God,” or else not even mentioning at all that “Son of God” is what He actually did claim. Then they use various statements from Scripture to build convincing arguments that He really did claim to be God. One such example is the following passage:

The Jews answered him, saying, For a good work we stone thee not; but for blasphemy; and because that thou, being a man, makest thyself God. Jesus answered them, Is it not written in your law, I said, Ye are gods? If he called them gods, unto whom the word of God came, and the scripture cannot be broken; Say ye of him, whom the Father hath sanctified, and sent into the world, Thou blasphemest; because I said, I am the Son of God? (John 10:33-36)

When the Jews accused Him of blasphemy saying “thou, being a man, makest thyself God” (Jhn 10:33), they weren’t accusing Him of claiming to be the one true God as some translations even render it, “you, a mere man, claim to be God” (NIV), “you, a man, are claiming to be God” (NET). Rather, that He was breaking the First Commandment, “Thou shalt have no other gods before me” (Exo 20:3). His reply “Is it not written in your law, I said, Ye are gods?” indicates this as being their accusation. Of course He was quoting from David’s Psalm, “I have said, Ye are gods” (Psa 82:6), where God was reminding His people that He had called their rulers “gods” when He said, “Thou shalt not revile the gods, nor curse the ruler of thy people” (Exo 22:28). But this was after “the word of God came” to them through Moses. What this means is that “the word of God” or the commandment “Thou shalt have no other gods before me,” was not being broken by God Himself later calling them “gods” in His statement, “Thou shalt not revile the gods.” So long as these men ruled as gods in submission and subordination to His authority as the one true God then there was no blasphemy. They were not breaking the First Commandment “Thou shalt have no other gods before me,” and this was also true with the Son of God because He always submitted to His Father.

His statement “whom the Father hath sanctified” is about the Father Himself setting apart His Son from everyone else that had been baptized by John, “And lo a voice from heaven, saying, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased” (Mat 3:17). Since God Himself called Jesus “my beloved Son” from heaven, what was wrong with Jesus calling Himself the Son of God? He was simply calling Himself what God had already called Him.

In the early church, the belief that Jesus is the Son of God is what they preached: “But these are written, that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God” (Jhn 20:31); “I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God” (Act 8:37); “And straightway he preached Christ in the synagogues, that he is the Son of God” (Act 9:20); “For the Son of God, Jesus Christ, who was preached among you by us” (2Co 1:19); “Whosoever shall confess that Jesus is the Son of God” (1Jo 4:15); “he that believeth that Jesus is the Son of God? … These things have I written unto you that believe on the name of the Son of God; that ye may know that ye have eternal life, and that ye may believe on the name of the Son of God” (1Jo 5:5, 13).

Trinitarians can’t legitimately argue against what the Father and Son both claimed and didn’t claim. Jesus never called Himself “God,” and God never called Jesus “God.” God called Jesus “my beloved Son,” and Jesus called Himself “the Son of God.” Who dare say otherwise?

The Son was begotten of the Father

“The LORD possessed me in the beginning of his way, before his works of old. I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, or ever the earth was. When there were no depths, I was brought forth; when there were no fountains abounding with water. Before the mountains were settled, before the hills was I brought forth” (Proverbs 8:22-25)

“And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten [monogenes 3439] of the Father,) full of grace and truth … No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten [monogenes 3439] Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him” (John 1:14, 18)

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten [monogenes 3439] Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life … He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten [monogenes 3439] Son of God” (John 3:16, 18)

“If God were your Father, ye would love me: for I proceeded forth and came from God; neither came I of myself, but he sent me” (John 8:42)

“For the Father himself loveth you, because ye have loved me, and have believed that I came out from God. I came forth from the Father, and am come into the world: again, I leave the world, and go to the Father.” (John 16:27-28).

“In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because that God sent his only begotten [monogenes 3439] Son into the world, that we might live through him.” (1 John 4:19)

Since God has no beginning but has always existed, and Jesus is God in the Trinitarian view, then Trinitarians can’t embrace the truth that Jesus was actually brought forth or begotten because this would mean that He had a beginning. Thus they had to invent the nonsensical claim that the Son is somehow eternally begotten or eternally generated which is an oxymoron.

Jesus claimed of Himself, “I proceeded forth and came from God” (Jhn 8:42), “I came out from God. I came forth from the Father, and am come into the world” (Jhn 16:27-28). That He “proceeded forth” and “came out from God” speaks of His own beginning when He was begotten “out from God” before He was “come into the world.” Those are His words about Himself!

At some point prior to the creation of the heavens and the earth, the Son was begotten of God, “When there were no depths, I was brought forth; when there were no fountains abounding with water. Before the mountains were settled, before the hills was I brought forth.” God became the Father by virtue of having begotten His Son, and the Son came into being by virtue of having been begotten by God.

The Greek monogenes for “only-begotten” or “only-born” in John 3:16 was maintained in mostly the older English versions: “only begotten Son” (ASV, BRG, DRA, GNV, JUB, KJV, MEV, NASB, NKJV, RGT); “only-begotten” (DARBY, EHV); “one begotten Son” (WYC); “only-born Son” (DLNT); “His Son – the only begotten” (YLT).

Sadly, many newer versions obscure the concept of begetting by rendering it: “one and only Son” (CSB, HCSB, LEB, MSG, MOUNCE, NCV, NET, NIRV, NIV, NLT, TLV, WEB); “only Son” (CEB, CEV, ERV, ESV, GW, GNT, ICB, PHILLIPS, TLB, NOG, NABRE, NLV, NMB, NRSV, RSV, VOICE, WE); “only and unique Son” (CJB); “uniquely existing Son” (ISV); “only, special son” (NTE); “one and only, unique Son” (TPT). Why conceal this? What’s the agenda?

The Son was the same kind of divine being as His Father

Paul began his letter to the Romans, “Concerning his Son Jesus Christ our Lord” (Rom 1:3), and went on to say, “Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them. For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse” (Rom 1:19-20). He was revealing that the creation itself teaches us that God has a Son after His kind:

“the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kindand herb yielding seed after his kind, and the tree yielding fruit, whose seed was in itself, after his kind … the waters brought forth abundantly, after their kind, and every winged fowl after his kind … bring forth the living creature after his kind, cattle, and creeping thing, and beast of the earth after his kind … the beast of the earth after his kind, and cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind” (Gen 1:11-12, 21, 24-25)

The Father is a divine kind of being and brought forth His Son as the exact same kind of divine being prior to creating all life to beget in a similar way. The procreation within the creation is patterned after this begetting. Therefore, the unbelieving Jews are without excuse for rejecting Jesus of Nazareth as the only begotten Son of God because the creation itself teaches this.

Since Jesus was begotten as the same kind of divine being with the same substance as His Father, He was equal with Him in power so that He was able to create the entire universe out of nothing, ex nihilo. Yet, at the same time He was not God! Only the Father occupies the position of God. The Son’s divine power was because He was a divine being just like His Father.

The plurality of the Creator

And God [elohiym 430] said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth. So God [elohiym 430] created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. (Genesis 1:26-27)

The use of plural personal pronouns in the creation account certainly indicates at least a second Person present but not necessarily a third Person as Trinitarians claim. In verse 26, God the Father was speaking to His Son and stating that they would make mankind after their image. Since the first Person—identified as God—spoke to the second Person using plural pronouns, this implies that only the first Person is God. And the switch to singular personal pronouns for God in verse 27 further substantiates this. Because both the Father and the Son were the same kind of being, therefore, man was said to be created after their image.

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made.” (John 1:1-3)

“And to make all men see what is the fellowship of the mystery, which from the beginning of the world hath been hid in God, who created all things by Jesus Christ” (Ephesians 3:9)

“Giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light: Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear SonFor by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him” (Colossians 1:12-13, 16)

God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets, Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds” (Hebrews 1:1-2)

The New Testament writers revealed that God the Father created all things by the agency of His Son. If someone, for example, sold their house by employing the service of a real estate agent, although the agent actually did the work, the homeowner still says that they sold their house. Thus, when we are told, “So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them,” it was actually the Son that had “formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life” (Gen 2:7), “And the rib, which the LORD God had taken from the man, made he a woman” (Gen 2:22), but is said to have been God.

All of the instances in Genesis chapter one where it’s recorded “And God said,” it wasn’t God speaking things into existence as typically claimed but rather that God the Father was speaking to His Son and telling Him what to create. This idea is corroborated by the statement, “And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.” Here He wasn’t speaking anything into existence but was simply speaking to His Son and telling Him what to create. This was also the case in every occurrence of “And God said” in the creation account. For example: in the very first act of creation, “And God said, Let there be light: and there was light,” it wasn’t God speaking light into existence but rather the Father saying to His Son “Let there be light” followed by the Son creating the light.

Now, throughout the six days of creation and seventh day of rest, only the term Elohiym for “God” is used. But beginning in Genesis 2:4 and through the rest of the chapter, the term Yehovah Elohiym for “the LORD God” is used. Again, this supports only two Persons involved in the creation: the first Person Elohiym is God the Father, and the second Person Yehovah Elohiym is the Son of God.

God the Father [Elohiym] directed His Son [Yehovah Elohiym] to make both male and female human beings after their image, “And God [Elohiym] said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness … So God [Elohiym] created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them.” The narrative then details the event of His Son [Yehovah Elohiym] making both male and female after their image, “And the LORD God [Yehovah Elohiym] formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life,” “And the rib, which the LORD God [Yehovah Elohiym] had taken from the man, made he a woman.

God didn’t speak the animals into existence either but spoke to His Son followed by His Son forming them, “And God [Elohiym] said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven … And God [Elohiym] said, Let the earth bring forth the living creature after his kind, cattle, and creeping thing, and beast of the earth after his kind: and it was so” (Gen 1:20, 24), “And out of the ground the LORD God [Yehovah Elohiym] formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air” (Gen 2:19). Furthermore, the heavens and the earth were not spoken into existence by God but were formed by the Son of God’s hands:

“Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet” (Psa 8:6); “Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet” (Heb 2:7-8)

“Of old hast thou laid the foundation of the earth: and the heavens are the work of thy hands” (Psa 102:25); “And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands” (Heb 1:10)

“When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained” (Psa 8:3)

“The sea is his, and he made it: and his hands formed the dry land” (Psa 95:5)

“Thus saith the LORD, the Holy One of Israel, and his Maker, Ask me of things to come concerning my sons, and concerning the work of my hands command ye me. I have made the earth, and created man upon it: I, even my hands, have stretched out the heavens, and all their host have I commanded.” (Isa 45:11-12)

Also, it was the Son of God that called to Adam after he sinned, “And the LORD God [Yehovah Elohiym] called unto Adam, and said unto him, Where art thou?” (Gen 3:9). And it was the Son of God that cursed the serpent, “And the LORD God [Yehovah Elohiym] said unto the serpent, Because thou hast done this, thou art cursed” (Gen 3:14). And finally, it was the Son of God that now spoke to His Father using a plural pronoun, “And the LORD God [Yehovah Elohiym] said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil” (Gen 3:22).

The Son is equal with the Father

“Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal [isos 2470] with God” (Phl 2:6). That He was “equal with God” speaks of His divinity and deity with God the Father by virtue of being His Son, and this is also how the Jews understood what He claimed of Himself, “Therefore the Jews sought the more to kill him, because he not only had broken the sabbath, but said also that God was his Father, making himself equal [isos 2470] with God” (Jhn 5:18).

To be “equal with God” doesn’t mean that He is God any more than the laborers that came last into the vineyard actually are the laborers that came first, “Saying, These last have wrought but one hour, and thou hast made them equal [isos 2470] unto us, which have borne the burden and heat of the day” (Mat 20:12). Rather, those that came last were given a similar level of equality with those that came first.

It’s because of possessing the same level of divine equality that the Father spoke to His Son using plural pronouns, “And God [Elohiym] said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness” (Gen 1:26), and the Son likewise spoke to His Father using plural pronouns, “And the LORD God [Yehovah Elohiym] said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil” (Gen 3:22).

In the Old Testament, the Malak Yehovah or Messenger of Jehovah was the pre-incarnate Son of God, “And the angel [malak 4397] of the LORD [Yehovah 3068] called unto Abraham out of heaven the second time, And said, By myself have I sworn, saith the LORD” (Gen 22:15-16). Unbelieving Jews, denying that Jesus of Nazareth is the Son of God, argued that this messenger was simply an angelic being. But the writer of Hebrews disputed, “Being made so much better than the angels, as he hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they. For unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee? And again, I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son?”(Heb 1:4-5), “For when God made promise to Abraham, because he could swear by no greater, he sware by himself” (Heb 6:13). The Messenger of Jehovah was equal with God—He swore by Himself because there is nobody greater! This is not true with actual angelic beings, “And the angel which I saw stand upon the sea and upon the earth lifted up his hand to heaven, And sware by him that liveth for ever and ever” (Rev 10:5-6).

Hypostatic Union

Hypostatic Union is a necessary byproduct of the Trinity. Since Trinitarians believe that God is a type of being and that Jesus is God, then His incarnation causes big problems with their view because God can’t cease being God which would be true when becoming human. God becoming something else would be the end of the doctrine of the Trinity and the end of God! Therefore, they must make the illogical claim that He is still 100% God even after becoming 100% human; that He has two fully complete but mutually exclusive natures in one person or being—Hypostatic Union. But nothing can be 100% one thing and 100% another thing at the same time. This is logically impossible. Although God cannot do what is logically impossible yet in the Trinitarian view, He somehow can. Violating rules of reason and sound logic just shows their desperation to make this false doctrine work. To be 100% one kind of being and 100% another kind of being at the same time requires two 100% beings or two persons. Therefore, in the Trinitarian view, the Second Person is actually two Persons!

But actually, the doctrine of the Hypostatic Union is quite unnecessary because there is no issue with the joining of two natures or types of beings since theos is not a nature or a type of being. There is no issue with God ceasing to be God in the incarnation because the Son of God never has been God but His Son.

A dual kind of being also flies in the face of what is known of God from the creation of the world, “Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them. For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made” (Rom 1:19-20). John said in two different writings, “No man hath seen God at any time” (Jhn 1:18; 1Jo 4:12). We can’t see Him because He is invisible but we can understand Him as the Father and His only begotten Son by the way things were made to beget. Not only was every kind of being made to beget after its kind, but also every kind of being begotten is only one kind of being—there are no dual kinds of beings in the world! If the Son of God is truly a dual kind of being then the creation would reflect dual kinds of beings for our understanding,“being understood by the things that are made.”

Jesus was born of a virgin

John gave the clear distinction between those who are of God and those who are not: “For many deceivers are entered into the world, who confess not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh” (1Jo 1:7), “Hereby know ye the Spirit of God: Every spirit that confesseth that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is of God: And every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God” (1Jo 4:2-3). That “Jesus Christ is come in the flesh” means two main things: (1) He pre-existed His humanity; (2) He became fully human like us in every regard.

The Son of God is utterly unique from us because He pre-existed His humanity—He came down from heaven into this world: “The LORD possessed me in the beginning of his way, before his works of old” (Pro 8:22); “He that cometh after me is preferred before me: for he was before me” (Jhn 1:15); “And no man hath ascended up to heaven, but he that came down from heaven” (Jhn 3:13); “For the bread of God is he which cometh down from heaven, and giveth life unto the world … For I came down from heaven, not to do mine own will, but the will of him that sent me” (Jhn 6:33, 38); “Verily, verily, I say unto you, Before Abraham was, I am” (Jhn 8:58); “And now, O Father, glorify thou me with thine own self with the glory which I had with thee before the world was” (Jhn 17:5); “The first man is of the earth, earthy: the second man is the Lord from heaven” (1Co 15:47); “And he is before all things, and by him all things consist” (Col 1:17).

We all have a human father but Jesus Christ was born of a virgin because God is His Father: “And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel” (Gen 3:15); “Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel” (Isa 7:14); “Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us” (Mat 1:23); “And the angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son of God” (Luk 1:35); “But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law” (Gal 4:4).

The Son of God became flesh

And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth” (Jhn 1:14); “But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men” (Phl 2:7); “Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same” (Heb 2:14).

Trinitarians claim that “the Word was made flesh” means that He “took on” flesh, assumed flesh, or added flesh to what He already was. Some even phrase it as “the flesh covered Word,” that He was simply cloaked with flesh. But “made flesh” means that He actually became flesh, a different kind or type of being than He was before—a human being. Saying that He only “took on” flesh is actually denying that He truly became flesh; the very confession John warned us about, “who confess not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh” (1Jo 1:7), “And every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God” (1Jo 4:3).

This erroneous concept of the incarnation is not only the result of Trinitarians having a wrong view of God but also a wrong view of man. I plan to address the ontology of man in a separate writing but will quickly mention it here. Man is simply a physical being animated by the Breath of God, “And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul” (Gen 2:7), “for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return” (Gen 3:19). He is dust. When he dies he is truly dead and can only live again by a resurrection from the grave.

Trinitarians, on the other hand, believe that man is some kind of a spiritual, non-physical being living inside a physical body that continues to live disembodied after death. And because man is supposedly a spirit being in a body as if wearing flesh like a suit of clothes, this correlates to their view of the Son of God’s incarnation—that He “took on” flesh over what He already was as if putting on flesh like a suit. But if we understand that man is strictly a physical being then “the Word was made flesh” truly means that the Son of God became or transitioned into a physical, flesh and blood being. He went from the divine kind of being He was, to the human kind of being He is now. Thus when He died and was buried, He truly was dead until He was brought to life again by resurrection, “I am he that liveth, and was dead; and, behold, I am alive for evermore, Amen” (Rev 1:18).

“Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: But made himself of no reputation [kenoo 2758], and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men” (Phl 2:6-7). Rather than “made himself of no reputation,” many versions render it much more correctly as “emptied himself.” Paul was saying that although the Son was equal with His Father in divinity and deity, He emptied Himself of this and was “made in the likeness of men.” That He emptied Himself means that He forever relinquished His divinity to become human just like we are.

The Son of God became just like we are so that in the resurrection we will be just like He is:  “And as we have borne the image of the earthy, we shall also bear the image of the heavenly” (1Co 15:49); “Who shall change our vile body, that it may be fashioned like unto his glorious body” (Phl 3:21); “When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall ye also appear with him in glory” (Col 3:4); “but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is” (1Jo 3:2). If He is a divine being in the flesh, then by correlation we also will be divine beings in the flesh.

Trinitarians sometimes call Christ the God-Man, but this isn’t what Paul called Him, “For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus” (1Ti 2:5). The mediator between God and men is not the God-Man but “the man Christ Jesus.” Many statements testify that the Son of Man is in heaven right now and the Son of Man is coming but nothing about a God-Man: “one like the Son of man came with the clouds of heaven” (Dan 7:13); “For the Son of man shall come in the glory of his Father with his angels … the Son of man coming in his kingdom” (Mat 16:27-28); “when the Son of man shall sit in the throne of his glory” (Mat 19:28); “so shall also the coming of the Son of man be … And then shall appear the sign of the Son of man in heaven … and they shall see the Son of man coming in the clouds of heaven with power and great glory … so shall also the coming of the Son of man be … so shall also the coming of the Son of man be … for in such an hour as ye think not the Son of man cometh” (Mat 24:27, 30, 37, 39, 44); “for ye know neither the day nor the hour wherein the Son of man cometh … When the Son of man shall come in his glory” (Mat 25:13, 31); “Hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven” (Mat 26:64); “of him also shall the Son of man be ashamed, when he cometh in the glory of his Father with the holy angels” (Mar 8:38); “And then shall they see the Son of man coming in the clouds with great power and glory” (Mar 13:26); “and ye shall see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven” (Mar 14:62); “of him shall the Son of man be ashamed, when he shall come in his own glory, and in his Father’s, and of the holy angels” (Luk 9:26); “Nevertheless when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth?” (Luk 18:8); “And then shall they see the Son of man coming in a cloud with power and great glory” (Luk 21:27); “Hereafter shall the Son of man sit on the right hand of the power of God” (Luk 22:69); “even the Son of man which is in heaven” (Jhn 3:13); “Behold, I see the heavens opened, and the Son of man standing on the right hand of God” (Act 7:56); “one like unto the Son of man, clothed with a garment down to the foot, and girt about the paps with a golden girdle” (Rev 1:13); “And I looked, and behold a white cloud, and upon the cloud one sat like unto the Son of man” (Rev 14:14).

The Son’s sacrifice for us

Trinitarians claim that Jesus had to be God in the flesh in order to pay the price for our sins as a sacrifice. But really this is just a ploy to argue what they want to prove. They want to prove that Jesus is God in the flesh so they came up with this argument to help support it. The sacrifice for our sins, however, is the perfect sacrifice God Himself provided and accepted: “God will provide himself a lamb” (Gen 22:8); “Your lamb shall be without blemish” (Exo 12:5); “Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world” (Jhn 1:29). If God chose to provide and accept His own Son, fully human and perfectly sinless, as the sacrifice for our sins then that is His prerogative to do so. Nobody can tell Him what He must accept—that the sacrifice must be a God-Man.

Furthermore, by claiming that Jesus had to be God in order to die as an acceptable sacrifice for our sins, Trinitarians opened a whole new can of worms—God can’t die! As if they didn’t already have enough illogical problems to deal with. But since God can’t die then they have to claim that only His humanity died. However, if only His humanity died then why argue that He had to be God to die for our sins?

The true sacrifice the Son of God made began with Him forever relinquishing His divinity by becoming fully human, “Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery [harpagmos 725] to be equal with God” (Phl 2:6). That He “thought it not robbery” conveys little of what is actually being said. The Greek harpagamos means “seized,” “grasped,” “held onto,” “prized,” or “retained.” There are many Bible versions that render it much more correctly as “a thing to be grasped.” It’s saying that He didn’t esteem His deity and divinity as something difficult to surrender by grasping and clinging to it. In other words, He was eager and willing to make that sacrifice for us. Retaining His divinity as Trinitarians claim actually diminishes the true sacrifice He made.

After relinquishing His divinity and becoming human, He suffered a life of temptation, humiliation, and rejection, culminating in the shameful and painful death on the cross. And finally, He is now and forever will be a human being with holes in His hands, feet, and side. What a wonderful and glorious Savior we have!

In the beginning, was the Word

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God.” (Jhn 1:1-2). Twice in this statement the Word is said to have been “with God” in the beginning. To be with someone indicates that two persons are together but distinct from each other. Only one of these two can actually be God while the other is with God. John began his first letter similarly, “That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked upon, and our hands have handled, of the Word of life; (For the life was manifested, and we have seen it, and bear witness, and shew unto you that eternal life, which was with the Father, and was manifested unto us;)” (1Jo 1:1-2). Here he stated clearly that it’s the Father that is God and the Word was with Him. Furthermore, a definite article is in both statements “the Word was with [the] God … The same was in the beginning with [the] God” but not in “the Word was God.” John didn’t say “the Word was [the] God.”

Is the Son of God literally “the Word” (Jhn 1:1)? Is He literally “the Light” (Jhn 1:7)? Obviously these are figures of speech describing His mission or purpose on earth and what He is like. The same is true of “the light was the life” (Jhn 1:4). Light is not actually life, and life is not actually light. These are metaphors which is a figure of speech in which one thing is spoken of as being the other thing even though it actually isn’t. John employed similar metaphors even for God Himself, “God is light” (1Jo 1:5), “God is love” (1Jo 4:8, 16). Of course God is not actually light or love but because God shows the characteristics of light and love to such a degree that metaphorical equality with them is warranted. That “the Word was God” (Jhn 1:1) is also a metaphor is attested by the Word Himself:

Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father; and how sayest thou then, Shew us the Father? Believest thou not that I am in the Father, and the Father in me? the words that I speak unto you I speak not of myself: but the Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works. (John 14:9-10)

Jesus is the Word because the words He spoke were not of Himself but of the Father. It’s because “No man hath seen God at any time” (Jhn 1:8) that when they saw Him, they were seeing the Father. He was like God the Father to such perfection that metaphorical equivalence, “the Word was God,” is justified. We’re told in other places: “Christ, who is the image of God” (2Co 4:4); “Who is the image of the invisible God” (Col 1:15); “Who being the brightness of his glory, and the express image of his person” (Heb 1:3). When people saw the Son of God, they were seeing God the Father metaphorically. Therefore, “the Word was God.”

Jesus ministered as the Prophet

It’s argued by Trinitarians that the miracles, signs, and wonders Jesus performed prove that He is God. But since the prophets and apostles also performed miracles, signs, and wonders, doesn’t this also prove that they are God? Trinitarians are unaware that the implication of their argument is that God is far more than just three Persons! He is the Father, Son, Holy Spirit, Moses, Elijah, Elisha, Peter, Paul, and even Phillip.

However, we are told specifically that the miracles, signs, and wonders Jesus performed were because God was with Him doing the works: “we know that thou art a teacher come from God: for no man can do these miracles that thou doest, except God be with him” (Jhn 3:2); “the Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works” (Jhn 14:10); “How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost and with power: who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him” (Act 10:38). Obviously, if God was with Him and God was doing the works then Jesus is not God. Jesus Himself stated that He could do nothing of His own self, “The Son can do nothing of himself, but what he seeth the Father do” (Jhn 5:19), “I can of mine own self do nothing” (Jhn 5:30), which were in reference to the miracle He had just performed in healing the impotent man at the pool of Bethesda (Jhn 5:1-15).

Jesus Christ is the Prophet that Moses foretold would come, “The LORD thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy brethren … I will raise them up a Prophet from among their brethren” (Deu 18:15, 18), and the people acknowledged Him as that Prophet: “This is Jesus the prophet of Nazareth of Galilee” (Mat 21:11); “That a great prophet is risen up among us; and, That God hath visited his people” (Luk 7:16); “Then those men, when they had seen the miracle that Jesus did, said, This is of a truth that prophet that should come into the world” (Jhn 6:14); “When Christ cometh, will he do more miracles than these which this man hath done? … Of a truth this is the Prophet” (Jhn 7:31, 40).

As the Prophet, He worked miracles no differently than the prophets Elijah and Elisha. They worked miracles by the Spirit of God upon them, “And it came to pass, when they were gone over, that Elijah said unto Elisha, Ask what I shall do for thee, before I be taken away from thee. And Elisha said, I pray thee, let a double portion of thy spirit be upon me.” (2Ki 2:9). Jesus performed miracles, signs, and wonders by the anointing of the Holy Spirit, “How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost and with power: who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him” (Act 10:38). There is no record of Him performing any miracles before the Spirit coming upon Him at His baptism. In fact, we’re even told that turning water into wine was His first miracle which was after He was baptized, “This beginning of miracles did Jesus in Cana of Galilee” (Jhn 2:11).

Of course Trinitarians also claim that the times Jesus knew people’s thoughts prove He is God: “Why reason ye these things in your hearts?” (Mar 2:8); “And Jesus knowing their thoughts” (Mar 9:4); “But he knew their thoughts” (Luk 6:8); “And Jesus, perceiving the thought of their heart” (Luk 9:47); “But he, knowing their thoughts” (Luk 11:17). But knowing certain people’s thoughts at times doesn’t correlate to Him knowing all people’s thoughts all the time. The Father simply allowed Him to know people’s thoughts at certain times by the power of the Holy Spirit. Upholding the doctrine of the Trinity requires accepting the ridiculous notion that Jesus knew everyone’s thoughts in the entire world even while a baby in the manger, and even while in His mother’s womb. Isaiah, however, prophesied that He would grow in the knowledge of good and evil:

Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel. Butter and honey shall he eat, that he may know to refuse the evil, and choose the good. For before the child shall know to refuse the evil, and choose the good, the land that thou abhorrest shall be forsaken of both her kings. (Isaiah 7:14-16)

Likewise, Luke told us that He not only grew in height but also in wisdom, “And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man” (Luk 2:52). How can God grow in wisdom? Trinitarians will likely resort to their trusty dual nature argument—that it was His human part that grew in wisdom and stature but His God part didn’t.

This is how they respond to the dilemma that “God cannot be tempted with evil” (Jam 1:13), yet He was tempted just as we are, “For in that he himself hath suffered being tempted” (Heb 2:18), “was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin” (Heb 4:15). It was supposedly His outward humanity that was tempted, not His inward deity.

And Jesus said, Who touched me? When all denied, Peter and they that were with him said, Master, the multitude throng thee and press thee, and sayest thou, Who touched me? And Jesus said, Somebody hath touched me: for I perceive that virtue is gone out of me.” (Luk 8:45-46). If He knew everything all the time, then why didn’t He know who touched Him at this time? He even said that the only reason He knew someone had touched Him was because He perceived virtue had gone out of Him. Was He just pretending to not really know? Mark’s version states, “And Jesus, immediately knowing in himself that virtue had gone out of him” (Mar 5:30). God doesn’t immediately know anything because He has always known everything.

Then of course Trinitarians simply have no viable explanation for Him not even knowing when He would return, “But of that day and that hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels which are in heaven, neither the Son, but the Father” (Mar 13:32). He would have known this if He truly still possessed all of His divine powers. The fact that only the Father knew this affirms that only the Father is God.

The Son is under the Father’s authority

Jesus Christ’s power, authority, and name are not inherent in Himself but given to Him by God the Father which Scripture attests in many places: “Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool” (Psa 110:1); “All things are delivered unto me of my Father” (Mat 11:27); “All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth” (Mat 28:18); “The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand” (Jhn 3:35); “Jesus knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands” (Jhn 13:3); “for my Father is greater than I” (Jhn 14:28); “Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted” (Act 2:33); “Him hath God exalted” (Act 5:31); “For he hath put all things under his feet. But when he saith all things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put all things under him. And when all things shall be subdued unto him, then shall the Son also himself be subject unto him that put all things under him, that God may be all in all” (1Co 15:27-28); “And hath put all things under his feet, and gave him to be the head over all things to the church” (Eph 1:22); “Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name” (Phl 2:9); “he hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they” (Heb 1:4); “Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet” (Heb 2:8); “angels and authorities and powers being made subject unto him” (1Pe 3:22); “Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing” (Rev 5:12).

As a human son is equal in humanity with his father but not in authority, so it is in a similar way with the Son of God and His Father. It makes no sense in the Trinitarian view that the Son of God is co-equal with His Father God. Furthering the confusion is that there is supposedly a third Person, not even part of the family, but also co-equal with the Father and with the Son.

It’s recognized by most Christians that Joseph’s life is allegorical and prophetic of Jesus Christ. But when Joseph was raised up from the dungeon and seated with Pharaoh on the throne in power over Egypt, he was not co-equal but second in authority, “Thou shalt be over my house, and according unto thy word shall all my people be ruled: only in the throne will I be greater than thou … And he made him to ride in the second chariot which he had; and they cried before him, Bow the knee: and he made him ruler over all the land of Egypt” (Gen 41:40, 43).

The throne is God the Father’s

The throne in heaven is God the Father’s as Jesus Himself said, “I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne” (Rev 3:21). Jesus Christ is always said to be seated at God’s right hand. We’re never told that God is seated next to the Son at His left hand. Why would this emphasis always be made if they’re co-equal? Also, we’re never told of another seat on the throne for a supposed third co-equal Person.

“Sit thou at my right hand” (Psa 110:1); “being by the right hand of God exalted” (Act 2:33); “who is even at the right hand of God” (Rom 8:34); “set him at his own right hand” (Eph 1:20); “Christ sitteth on the right hand of God” (Col 3:1); “sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high” (Heb 1:3); “who is set on the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in the heavens” (Heb 8:1); “sat down on the right hand of God” (Heb 10:12); “is set down at the right hand of the throne of God” (Heb 12:2); “is on the right hand of God” (1Pe 3:22).

The Father is Jesus’ God

Not only is Jesus Christ not God Himself, but Jesus Christ Himself has a God—His Father is His God. God cannot have a God because then He wouldn’t be God. Jesus is not God because He has a God. God is the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ and also the God of our Lord Jesus Christ.

“My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? … O my God, I cry in the daytime … thou art my God from my mother’s belly” (Psa 22:1-2, 10); “I delight to do thy will, O my God” (Psa 40:8); “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” (Mat 27:46; Mar 15:34), “I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God” (Jhn 20:17); “God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom 15:6); “And ye are Christ’s; and Christ is God’s” (1Co 3:23); “the head of Christ is God” (1Co 11:3); “The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (2Co 11:31); “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Eph 1:3); “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory” (Eph 1:17); “God and the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Col 1:3); “therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows” (Heb 1:9); “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (1Pe 1:3); “Him that overcometh will I make a pillar in the temple of my God, and he shall go no more out: and I will write upon him the name of my God, and the name of the city of my God, which is new Jerusalem, which cometh down out of heaven from my God” (Rev 3:12).

The Breath from the beginning

“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit [ruwach 7307] of God moved upon the face of the waters” (Gen 1:1-2). The Hebrew ruwach in this very first statement of the creation account is translated “Spirit” as if it’s a type of being or a person. However, the second occurrence of ruwach in Scripture is within a context where it’s a wind or a breeze, “And they heard the voice of the LORD God walking in the garden in the cool [ruwach 7307] of the day” (Gen 3:8), “the time of the evening breeze” (CSB), “the breezy time of the day” (NET), “the breeze of the day” (YLT).

Throughout the Old Testament Scriptures, where context forced the translators to render ruwach literally as “wind” or “breath” they had no choice but to oblige: “All in whose nostrils was the breath [ruwach 7307] of life” (Gen 7:22); “And God remembered Noah, and every living thing, and all the cattle that was with him in the ark: and God made a wind [ruwach 7307] to pass over the earth, and the waters asswaged” (Gen 8:1); “And Moses stretched forth his rod over the land of Egypt, and the LORD brought an east wind [ruwach 7307] upon the land all that day, and all that night; and when it was morning, the east wind [ruwach 7307] brought the locusts” (Exo 10:13); “And there went forth a wind [ruwach 7307] from the LORD, and brought quails from the sea” (Num 11:31); “at the rebuking of the LORD, at the blast of the breath [ruwach 7307] of his nostrils” (2Sa 22:16); “By the blast of God they perish, and by the breath [ruwach 7307] of his nostrils are they consumed” (Job 4:9).

But where the context allowed a degree of liberty, Trinitarian translators capitalized by rendering it “spirit” to be consistent with their doctrinal bias: “And the Spirit [ruwach 7307] of God moved upon the face of the waters.” (Gen 1:2); “And the LORD said, My spirit [ruwach 7307] shall not always strive with man” (Gen 6:3); “Can we find such a one as this is, a man in whom the Spirit [ruwach 7307] of God is?” (Gen 41:38); “And the Spirit [ruwach 7307] of the LORD came upon him” (Jdg 3:10).

The same is observed with its Greek counterpart pneuma—it’s rendered “wind” when the context forces it but “spirit” when the context allows: “The wind [pneuma 4151] bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the Spirit [Pneuma 4151]” (Jhn 3:8).

Both ruwach and pneuma literally mean “wind” or “breath,” but they are also used figuratively conveying the idea of unseen forces such as inner human emotions and external influences: “I will speak in the anguish of my spirit [ruwach 7307]” (Job 7:11); “Hereby know we the spirit [pneuma 4151] of truth, and the spirit [pneuma 4151] of error” (1Jo 4:6); “For God hath not given us the spirit [pneuma 4151] of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind” (2Ti 1:7).

The bottom line is that when these words are used in relation to God as with “Breath [ruwach 7307] of God [elohiym 430]” and “Breath [pneuma 4151] of God [theos 2316],” rather than assuming the literal meaning of “Breath” (to be consistent with sound interpretation which defaults to the literal unless there is compelling contextual reason to resort to the metaphorical), the translators rendered them metaphorically as “Spirit.” Their compelling reason, evidently, is their own Trinitarian doctrinal bias they’re imposing upon the Scriptures.

Furthermore, translating Greek neuter-gender pronouns into English personal, masculine pronouns just punctuates their agenda. For example: “The Spirit itself” (Rom 8:16, 26 KJV, DBY, WEB), is rendered “The Spirit himself” (ASV, CSB, ESV, HNV, NET, NKJV, RSV, YLT).

The Breath according to Jesus

In the Gospel of John chapters 14-16, Jesus spoke to His disciples about the Holy Breath of God as if it’s a person. However, He concluded this discourse by explaining that He had been speaking figuratively, “These things have I spoken unto you in proverbs: but the time cometh, when I shall no more speak unto you in proverbs, but I shall shew you plainly of the Father” (Jhn 16:25). Rather than “in proverbs,” other translations have “figures of speech,” “figurative language,” and “figuratively.” Although Jesus Himself said that He had been speaking figuratively, Trinitarians say otherwise. They disagree with Him and take it literally instead.

Jesus also told His disciples that the time would come when He would “shew you plainly of the Father.” That time came after His resurrection, “Then said Jesus to them again, Peace be unto you: as my Father hath sent me, even so send I you. And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost” (Jhn 20:21-22). As the Father had sent Jesus in the power of His Breath, Jesus was now sending them in the same power of the Father’s Breath. It’s not a person but simply the Breath of the Father God as He now showed them plainly by breathing on them.

When Jesus informed His disciples that He had been speaking to them figuratively, He was referring not only to what He had just said to them about the Holy Breath, but also to many things He had been telling them during His ministry. Here are just a few examples: “Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, ye have no life in you” (Jhn 6:53). Are we to literally eat Christ’s flesh and drink His blood? “I am the good shepherd: the good shepherd giveth his life for the sheep” (Jhn 10:11). Is Jesus literally a Shepherd? Were the disciples following Him literally sheep? “I am the true vine, and my Father is the husbandman … I am the vine, ye are the branches” (Jhn 15:1, 5). Is Jesus literally a Vine? Is His Father literally a Husbandman? Were the disciples literally branches? And concerning the Holy Breath, “He that believeth on me, as the scripture hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water. (But this spake he of the Spirit [Breath], which they that believe on him should receive: for the Holy Ghost [Breath] was not yet given; because that Jesus was not yet glorified.)” (Jhn 7:38-39). Now, Trinitarians certainly aren’t going to say that the Holy Breath is literally “rivers of living water” because then they would be denying Personhood. But since they must admit Jesus was speaking figuratively here, they can’t insist He was speaking literally of a Person later, especially since Jesus Himself said He was speaking figuratively!

And I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter [parakletos 3875], that he may abide [meno 3306] with you for ever; Even the Spirit [Breath] of truth; whom the world cannot receive, because it seeth him not, neither knoweth him: but ye know him; for he dwelleth [meno 3306] with you, and shall be in you. I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you. (John 14:16-18)

Here He was speaking of Himself as “the Spirit [Breath] of truth” that would abide or dwell with them. That “he may abide [meno 3306] with you” and “he dwelleth [meno 3306] with you” is about Himself is evident by Him then saying, “my Father will love him, and we will come unto him, and make our abode [mone 3438] with him,” “These things have I spoken unto you, being yet present [meno 3306] with you” (Jhn 14:25). The Greek verb meno is in the present active tense. The disciples would know the Breath of truth when He comes because He has already been present with them and dwelling with them for over three years.

The Parakletos or Comforter, Helper, or Advocate that Jesus spoke about figuratively as if another Person (Jhn 14:16, 26, 15:26, 16:7), John later wrote that it’s actually the Person of Jesus Christ Himself, “My little children, these things I write to you, so that you may not sin. And if anyone sins, we have an Advocate [Parakletos] with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous.” (1Jo 2:1). He is the righteous Parakletos at the right hand of the Father which is how He described Himself in His role as the Parakletos, “of righteousness, because I go to My Father and you see Me no more” (Jhn 16:10). We don’t see Him anymore because the tomb is empty and He ascended to the right hand of the Father. His resurrection and ascension, therefore, proves that He is our righteous Advocate at the Father’s right hand.

Paul also understood that the Holy Breath is the presence of Christ advocating or making intercession for us to the Father, “the Spirit [Breath] of Christ” (Rom 8:9), “the Spirit [Breath] itself maketh intercession for us” (Rom 8:26), “he maketh intercession for the saints” (Rom 8:27), “It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us” (Rom 8:34).

The reason Jesus spoke of the Breath as a Person is because it is Himself, and He is a Person! In the book of Revelation, Jesus Christ gave messages to the seven churches in Asia and ends each one with “He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit [Breath] saith unto the churches” (Rev 2:7, 11, 17, 29, 3:6, 13, 22). He was calling Himself “the Breath.”

The Holy Breath

The “Spirit [Breath] of God” belongs to God or is a possession of God. If it’s a third co-equal Person, then the third Person belongs to the first Person as His possession. The reason the Breath belongs to God is simply because it’s His Breath. It’s the Breath of the Father or the Father’s Breath: “For it is not ye that speak, but the Spirit [Breath] of your Father which speaketh in you” (Mat 10:20); “If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children: how much more shall your heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit [Breath] to them that ask him?” (Luk 11:13); “But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit [Breath] of truth, which proceedeth from the Father, he shall testify of me” (Jhn 15:26); “Then said Jesus to them again, Peace be unto you: as my Father hath sent me, even so send I you. And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost [Breath]” (Jhn 20:21-22).

The Holy Breath is God’s Breath because all Scripture was given through the mouths of prophets by the Holy Breath: “For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost [Breath]” (2Pe 1:21); “the Holy Ghost [Breath] by the mouth of David spake” (Act 1:16); “spake the Holy Ghost [Breath] by Esaias the prophet” (Act 28:25). Paul told us that “All scripture is given by inspiration of God” (2Ti 3:16), or that it was “God-breathed” (YLT), “breathed out by God” (ESV).

When Jesus died on the cross, He committed His own breath to His Father then breathed out or exhaled: “Jesus, when he had cried again with a loud voice, yielded up the ghost [breath]” (Mat 27:50); “And Jesus cried with a loud voice, and gave up the ghost [exhaled]” (Mar 15:37); “And when Jesus had cried with a loud voice, he said, Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit [breath]: and having said thus, he gave up the ghost [exhaled]” (Luk 23:46); “When Jesus therefore had received the vinegar, he said, It is finished: and he bowed his head, and gave up the ghost [breath]” (Jhn 19:30). This is what Paul meant by “We having the same spirit [breath] of faith [faithfulness], according as it is written, I believed [trusted], and therefore have I spoken; we also believe [trust], and therefore speak; Knowing that he which raised up the Lord Jesus shall raise up us also by Jesus, and shall present us with you.” (2Co 4:13-14). Christ was faithful to His Father in going to the cross to die for our sins then committed or trusted His breath to His Father, “Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit [breath].” Likewise, we are to be faithful to Christ then commit our breath to Him, “And they stoned Stephen, calling upon God, and saying, Lord Jesus, receive my spirit [breath]” (Act 7:59).

When God the Father raised Jesus from the dead, He breathed life back into Him, “This Jesus hath God raised up, whereof we all are witnesses. Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost [Breath]” (Act 2:32-33). The promise of the Holy Breath is the promise the Father made to His Son that He would breathe life back into Him, “the promise of the Spirit [Breath] … till the seed should come to whom the promise was made” (Gal 3:14, 19).

If we belong to Jesus Christ, we have the same promise of the Holy Breath—the promise that we also will be raised from the dead by God breathing life into us: “ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost [Breath]. For the promise is unto you” (Act 2:38-39); “that we might receive the promise of the Spirit [Breath] through faith [faithfulness]” (Gal 3:14); “ye were sealed with that holy Spirit [Breath] of promise” (Eph 1:13).

The Son of God created Adam by forming his body from the ground and breathing life into his nostrils, “And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed [naphach 5301] into his nostrils the breath [neshamah 5397] of life; and man became a living soul” (Gen 2:7). The Hebrew neshamah is used interchangeably with ruwach: “All in whose nostrils was the breath [ruwach 7307] of life” (Gen 7:22); “All the while my breath [neshamah 5397] is in me, and the spirit [ruwach 7307] of God is in my nostrils” (Job 27:3); “The Spirit of God hath made me, and the breath [neshamah 5397] of the Almighty hath given me life” (Job 33:4); “Cease ye from man, whose breath [neshamah 5397] is in his nostrils” (Isa 2:22).

Paul quoted from the creation of man when writing to the Corinthians about the resurrection from the dead, “And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit [breath]” (1Co 15:45), “And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul” (Gen 2:7). As the Son of God raised Adam from the ground and breathed life into Him, the Father raised the Son from the ground and breathed life back into Him. The initial creation of man to life was illustrative and prophetic of the resurrection of man back to life. As with the first Adam, so it was with the last Adam, “But if the Spirit [Breath] of him that raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you” (Rom 8:11), “being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit [Breath]” (1Pe 3:18).

That Christ “was made a quickening spirit [breath]” speaks of Him raising the dead at the last day, “For as the Father raiseth up the dead, and quickeneth them; even so the Son quickeneth whom he will” (Jhn 5:21), “but should raise it up again at the last day … and I will raise him up at the last day … and I will raise him up at the last day … and I will raise him up at the last day” (Jhn 6:39-40, 40, 44). Paul spoke of the Lord Jesus Christ as the Breath that gives life from the dead, “the spirit [breath] giveth life … Now the Lord is that Spirit [Breath]” (2Co 3:6, 17).

But ye are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit [Breath], if so be that the Spirit [Breath] of God dwell in you. Now if any man have not the Spirit [Breath] of Christ, he is none of his. And if Christ be in you, the body is dead because of sin; but the Spirit is life because of righteousness. But if the Spirit [Breath] of him that raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, he that raised up Christ from the dead shall also quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit [Breath] that dwelleth in you. (Romans 8:9-11)

The indwelling Holy Breath is an earnest or pledge from the Father that He will raise us to life as He raised His Son, “Who hath also sealed us, and given the earnest of the Spirit [Breath] in our hearts” (2Co 1:22), “God, who also hath given unto us the earnest of the Spirit [Breath]” (2Co 5:5), “ye were sealed with that holy Spirit [Breath] of promise, Which is the earnest of our inheritance” (Eph 1:13-14).

This is why it’s called the promise of the Breath: “I send the promise of my Father upon you” (Luk 24:49); “but wait for the promise of the Father, which, saith he, ye have heard of me” (Act 1:4); “having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost [Breath]” (Act 2:32-33); “the gift of the Holy Ghost [Breath]. For the promise is unto you,” (Act 2:38-39); “that we might receive the promise of the Spirit [Breath] through faith [faithfulness]” (Gal 3:14); “that holy Spirit [Breath] of promise” (Eph 1:13).

By making God’s Breath to be an actual person, it’s quite disturbing that Trinitarian Christians are worshipping a “person” that doesn’t even exist! Pentecostals and Charismatics in particular sometimes focus even more on this supposed “person” than on the true Persons of the Father and the Son. It’s because God’s Breath is in our hearts that a limited manifestation of Christ is dwelling within us, “the Spirit of Christ” (Rom 8:9; 1Pet 1:11), “And if Christ be in you” (Rom 8:10), “the Spirit of Jesus Christ” (Phl 1:19), “Christ in you, the hope of glory” (Col 1:27). It’s not a third person. It’s the presence of the Person our Lord Jesus Christ.

Is the Trinity a mystery?

The Jewish people have always understood the Breath of God to be a limited manifestation of the one true God. Even Trinitarians reluctantly admit that there is nothing in the Old Testament that even hints at the ruwach of God being a Person. Therefore, they must claim that Personhood was a mystery revealed in the New Testament.

“I said, Ye are gods? If he called them gods, unto whom the word of God came” (Jhn 10:34-35). That plural persons are plural gods and a singular Person is the One God is such a simple concept that even I can understand it. But scholars and theologians that are much more brilliant than myself (and I say that sincerely, not sarcastically) can’t even understand their own doctrine. They claim that the reason the doctrine of the Trinity doesn’t make sense is because it’s a mystery that can’t be comprehended by the finite human mind. But the real reason it doesn’t make sense is that it’s nonsense!

When a doctrine is illogical to the point that even the most intelligent scholars admit to not being able to understand it, they’re unwittingly refuting it. Calling this doctrine a mystery is simply a means of deflecting the issue because a mystery is not something that can’t be understood but simply something that is hidden. The actual mysteries in Scripture are concepts that could be understood but were not understood only because they were purposely hidden by God.

The apostle Paul said that “the mystery of God” can be understood, “That their hearts might be comforted, being knit together in love, and unto all riches of the full assurance of understanding, to the acknowledgement of the mystery of God, and of the Father, and of Christ” (Col 2:2). The Father and Christ (with no mention of a third Person) can be understood. And he wasn’t saying that only the apostles can understand it but even the average Christians in Colossae and Laodicea, “And when this epistle is read among you, cause that it be read also in the church of the Laodiceans” (Col 4:16). If the Colossians and Laodiceans can understand “the mystery of God, and of the Father, and of Christ” then there’s hope for the rest of us.

Conclusion

If we really love God and we love people as we claim, we’ll forsake this false doctrine and teach people the truth. Jesus asked Peter three times if he loved Him (John 21:15-17), but not accepting his verbal affirmation as the answer. He was making it clear that Peter could only answer this question by his actions—going out and faithfully feeding His sheep. Just declaring that we love Him doesn’t necessarily mean that we do. Our love for Him is shown by suffering the consequences of teaching and preaching the truth. If we really love Him, we’ll embrace the truth ourselves and teach the truth to others. We’ll feed His sheep.

Feeding His sheep means that we’re not going to be teaching doctrine that we know to be false but what we believe to be true! We can sincerely believe in the doctrine of the Trinity, and God will forgive us once we come to the knowledge of the truth and repent. He knows our hearts and is merciful to sincere ignorance but not to willful rebellion. Therefore, once we know that a particular doctrine is false, we can’t continue to embrace and teach it without our relationship with God being adversely compromised, not only severely but even eternally. He will give us space to repent but there will come a cutoff point where He decides the time is over, “And I gave her space to repent of her fornication; and she repented not” (Rev 2:21).

My prayer and sincere desire is that we all will humble ourselves and submit to the truth so that Jesus Christ our Lord will receive all of the glory forever. He sacrificed Himself for us and the least we can do is sacrifice ourselves daily for others, “If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me” (Luk 9:23), “I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service” (Rom 12:1).